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The Definitive Guide to Grails (Expert's Voice in Web Development) Paperback – 2 Aug 2011


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Product details

  • Paperback: 652 pages
  • Publisher: Springer; 2 edition (2 Aug. 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1590599950
  • ISBN-13: 978-1590599952
  • Product Dimensions: 17.8 x 3.7 x 23.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,032,069 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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About the Author

Graeme Rocher is an experienced software engineer, consultant and dynamic language expert. Graeme is project lead of the open source Grails web application framework (Grails.org) and author of The Definitive Guide to Grails. In Graeme's role as head of Grails development at SpringSource, the professional open source services company behind the Spring framework, Graeme leads the development of the Grails web framework and provides consulting, training and support to SpringSource's clients. Graeme is a frequent speaker at industry conferences on subjects related to Groovy, Grails and dynamic languages in Java. Prior to joining SpringSource Graeme co-founded G2One the Groovy/Grails Company which was later acquired by SpringSource.

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By KJ on 15 Feb. 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I bought this book based on the reviews of others and I must admit to been underwhelmed.

"The Definitive Guide" it is not. What is presented is a well crafted example that guides your through the basics. There is no mention of best practices or reference to real world design decisions that you would need to make in the real world. Granted, thats an expectation of mine and not the authors.

At times I wasn't entirely sure whether I should be adding some of the code examples to my private version of gTunes that you build up as you work through the book or whether the code was provided for information purposes. This required flicking back and forth making it harder to follow.

I also found the book a little disjointed. The book introduces concepts as you go through the example system but there is often references to cocepts that have not been introduced.

In summary a good book but nothing special as far as tech books go. It does whats intended but other than offering a basic beginners guide I can't see myself using this as a reference.

"Grails in Action" is a much better book and one that covers all the bases for someone wishing to learn a new technology. The coverage is more in-depth and I felt had a little more substance to it. In my opinion the
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Format: Paperback
The books builds a music store application - 'gTunes'.
It calls upon Amazon Web Services to download album art and Quicktime to playback music as streaming audio. Initially this is done natively with Groovy and later a technique is used to call upon Java's NIO methods to make process more efficient.

An email notification services is provided enabling users to be notified of new album releases by an artist by using ActiveMQ JMS.
The book also demostrates FCKEditor, a web enabled text editor akin to Word, conventionally used for blogging, but added to the pot to integrate web master style announcements.

Grails is build upon Spring and Hibernate 3. It simplifies the developers life though by abstracting away the need to deal directly with so much of the XML configuration. So in effect you don't have as many disparate artifacts making up the code. It does this by utilising closures one of tne key features of Groovy. I believe Grails draws some of its inspiration from Ruby on Rails and follows the mantra. Convention over Configuration. All this makes the developers life easier.

Other aspects where Grails shines are in the way that all the telemetry involved in handling pagination. This is automatically provided out of the box.

The book shows how to create wizard type functionality. Now this builds upon Spring Web Flow. Grails narrows the disparity between the traditional Spring programming models of 'Spring MVC' versus 'Spring Web Flow' in this process and makes use of things like conversational and flash scopes. Something Struts 2 or JBoss Seam developers will be familiar with.

GORM the Groovy object relational mapping technology is showcased in detail.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By DenisH on 26 Sept. 2009
Format: Paperback
I've been meaning to learn Grails for ages and then two projects came along for which Grails seemed like the ideal choice. This book assumes that you already know Groovy (if not, then Groovy in Action is an ideal companion--though there is an Appendix on Groovy in the book). It then steps you though buiding a music store. It introduces all the key concepts such as Domain objects, Controllers and views, but also covers security (very well, with all sorts of generally useful security hints), url rewriting, services, commands and taglibs.

It also shows you how to leverage existing plug-ins and to write your own (including why you should do this even if you don't intend to make it publicly available).

All in all an excellent, clearly written, useful book.
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By Kate Armitage on 16 Sept. 2011
Format: Paperback
This book reads more like marketing. Everything is "easy" but little is rigorously described.

Indeed the example application seems to "work" but it is fairly trivial, one doesn't really get the feeling one has proved anything other than hacking to make a very special case work, and one doesn't get any feeling for whether this could scale up to persisting 100's of 1000's of objects (in fact - not many) from what I see, I strongly suspect not. It's difficult to tell whether there are limitations in Grails, Hibernate, or the book is glossing over difficult subjects. The book seems unable to decide if it is an easy primer or if it is a book of reference "The definitive guide to" would suggest the latter.

I suggest reading p51 paragraph "Customizing Your Database Mapping" to get an idea why this book is so irritating. Excluding the code examples, more than half of the actual text in the page is empty and patronizing hype. What might be more useful here might be a definitive list of the available type mappings, or a definitive and complete list of the syntax of the mapping variable.

Perhaps the problem with this book is that it is so driven by the example application that one doesn't get the feeling of having a full view of what is possible or might be interesting to try out in order to think before starting to hack.

I also find the type-setting detrimental to the readability.

Please change as follows:
Less "it's easy to..."
More "the options are..."
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