Defeat Into Victory: (Pan Military Classics Series) and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
Buy Used
£5.70
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Ships from the USA. Please allow 2 to 3 weeks for delivery. This book has a light amount of wear to the pages, cover and binding. Hot deals from the land of the sun.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Defeat into Victory: Battling Japan in Burma and India, 1942-1945 Paperback – 28 Mar 2000


See all 22 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£12.44
Paperback, 28 Mar 2000
£5.70
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


Product details

  • Paperback: 616 pages
  • Publisher: Cooper Square Press; 1 edition (28 Mar. 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0815410220
  • ISBN-13: 978-0815410225
  • Product Dimensions: 14.3 x 3.1 x 21.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (48 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,448,668 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

About the Author

William Joseph Slim, first Viscount, was born in 1891. He took a commission in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment and served in the Middle East, India and Burma, reaching Field-Marshal in 1948. His other books include Unofficial History (1959). He died in 1972. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

31 of 31 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 24 May 2000
Format: Paperback
Field Marshall Slim provides an in-depth account of this campaign from the withdrawal into India to the final defeat of Japan. The book is a must for any would-be leader of military men and is a bible for those studying leadership. The campaign is centred on the Battle for Imphal and Kohima and then the eventual clearing of Burma and the opposed crossing of the Irrawady River, no mean feat considering it is 1.5 miles wide in places! Those that read this book will not only enjoy the style but also learn the ins and out of how the campaign was run and how thin the line was between success and defeat. The more modern copies have reduced the maps which make studying them more difficult. I would therefore recommend an older copy to get the most out of the book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
52 of 53 people found the following review helpful By Warren Wilson on 25 July 2004
Format: Paperback
I have read alot of military history, however this book stands out beyond most. Slim takes us through the early, tough years, and explains how 14th Army had to be built from the ground up in patient step by step moves. Slim explains how his greatest challenge, and ultimately his greatest triumph, was convincing 14th Army they could defeat the Japanese in the jungle. The force he forged defeated the Japanese at Imphal and succeeded in driving their still mighty forces all the way back to Rangoon in what Weintraub called "14th Army's Jungle Blitzkrieg".
The challenges of supply were immense. Slim spends some time heaping laurels on both his subordinates and superiors and is quick to point out his mistakes. As someone said, there is no limit to what a man can do as long as he doesn't care who gets the credit. In the long run, Slim was perhaps the finest British general officer of the war, and could compete for the title in any army. Given the 14th Army he led was last in line for everything given demands in other theaters, his personal leadership had a huge effect on turning the tables against Japan in Southeast Asia.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
43 of 44 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 1 Feb. 2002
Format: Paperback
This book consists of the military memoirs of Viscount Slim. Slim was only the second British soldier in the history of the British Army to advance from the rank of Private to the rank of Field Marshal (the first being "Wully" Robertson of WW1 fame). Though less well known than Monty, in my opinion he was the best British general of WW2 and could certainly compete for the title of Best Allied General. His memoirs begin with typical modesty, outlining what he feels to be the limits of historical autobiography and memoirs. He then proceeds to detail his exploits, beginning at the time he was assigned to Burma under General Alexander. The book is important both as a work of history and as a personal memoir and is written in a witty and engaging style. It also provides various general observations on command that would be of use to any serving officer - definitely one for any young subaltern to find space for in his pack! The author pays generous tribute to those he served with and at the risk of sounding somewhat sycophantic, comes over as a true gentleman. He offers objective analysis of the non-British troops he served with and against, including Americans, Chinese and Japanese and never stints on giving praise when it is due - either to allies or the Japanese. This is a splendid memoir written by somebody who was a superb general and clearly a splendid person in his own right. If you are a military officer or have a serious interest in history this book deserves (demands!)a place on your shelf.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Lou on 28 Nov. 2011
Format: Paperback
I have little expertise on military history and none of military tactics but I am fascinated by the tales that come out of warfare for many different reasons. Many of the reviews for this book are from miltary types, do not be put off by this because this is a cracking good read for all of an exceptional man undertaking an exceptional task.
The way Slim manages some cantankerous members of his senior staff is an object lesson in good management which we can all learn from. The exciting tale of the Battle for Burma is gripping. He conveys his feeling for the horrors endured by all the soldiers, not just Allied. It is shocking that one reviewer focuses on just one comment when Slim refers to "only" 2000+ casualities as this is not typical of his writing at all and is very selective. Throughout the book Slim clearly was looking at ways to minimise the number of Allied casualities. The same reviewer makes play also of his one reference to "slit eyed" Japenese, again this is unfair to Slim as he consistently praises the efforts of Indian, Burmese and African solidiers in his army AND consistently praises the bravery of the Japenese, also recognising when he wrongly typecasts the tactics of Japanese generals. Given this book was written in the 1950s Slim should be recognised as being ahead of his time as a military person in his attitude to different ethnic groups.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Jon Latimer on 21 Mar. 2007
Format: Paperback
Not only was Bill Slim probably the best British commander of the Second World War, his memoir is far and away the best examination of the demands of high command yet written. It is not self-serving and tendentious like the writings of Montgomery; in its examination of events it is factual and down to earth, but warmth of the man still shines through.

Slim was perhaps fortunate in being able to win back what had previously been lost, and did not suffer the ignominies heaped upon Wavell. This was partly because when he became corps commander in Burma during the retreat in 1942, he could not possibly be held responsible for the situation he inherited. By the time he was appointed commander of Fourteenth Army, matters were still desperate as the Japanese attempted an invasion of India. And throughout his tenure, he struggled with his command being at the bottom of Allied global priorities.

Yet he was able, through dedication, skill and force of personality to lead his multi-national army - some 750,000 comprised of Britons, a great many Africans from across the continent, but principally Indians - in the reconquest of Burma. Not only that, he achieved this in a country devoid of the means of support, crossing great rivers, jungle clad mountains and burning plains. He was a truly great leader. 'He understood men', wrote the Australian Roy McKie. 'He spoke their language as he moved among them, from forward positions to training bases. He had the richest of common-sense, a dour soldier's humour and a simple earthy wisdom. Wherever he moved he lifted morale. He was the finest of Englishmen.'
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback