Includes FREE MP3
version
of this album.
or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Available to Download Now
 
Buy the MP3 album for 7.99
 
 
 
 
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 

Death Or Glory [CD]

Roy Harper Audio CD
4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
Price: 14.96 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
 : Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.
   Does not apply to gift orders. See Terms and Conditions for important information about costs that may apply for the MP3 version in case of returns and cancellations.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Want it Saturday, 12 July? Choose Express delivery at checkout. Details
Complete your purchase to add the MP3 version to your Amazon music library. Provided by Amazon EU S. r.l.
Buy the MP3 album for 7.99 at the Amazon Digital Music Store.


Amazon's Roy Harper Store

Music

Image of album by Roy Harper

Photos

Image of Roy Harper
Visit Amazon's Roy Harper Store
for 37 albums, photos, discussions, and more.

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Spend 30 and get Norton 360 21.0 - 3 Computers, 1 Year 2014 for 24.99. Here's how (terms and conditions apply)

Frequently Bought Together

Death Or Glory + Unknown Soldier
Buy the selected items together
  • Unknown Soldier 13.09

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product details

  • Audio CD (28 July 2008)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: CD
  • Label: Science Friction
  • ASIN: B00004SZAK
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 195,326 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Listen to Samples and Buy MP3s

Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Samples
Song Title Time Price
Listen  1. Death Or Glory? 5:050.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  2. The War Came Home Tonight 4:220.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  3. Duty 1:260.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. Waiting For Godot Part Zed 3:290.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  5. Next To Me 3:170.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  6. The Methane Zone 3:350.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  7. The Tallest Tree 4:520.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  8. Miles Remains 8:520.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  9. The Fourth World 7:220.99  Buy MP3 
Listen10. Why?0:440.99  Buy MP3 
Listen11. Evening Star 6:040.99  Buy MP3 
Listen12. Cardboard City 3:240.99  Buy MP3 
Listen13. One More Tomorrow 5:220.99  Buy MP3 
Listen14. On Summer Day 5:400.99  Buy MP3 


Product Description

Product Description

Roy Harper was spurred into making one of his best albums only after his wife abruptly left him in 1992, thrusting him into a deep despair. The rawness of Death or Glory?, and the fact that it was conceived after the bitter dissolution of a decade-long relationship, makes it the emotional, if not artistic, heir of John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band. The album shuns Harper's penchant for over-production in lieu of his more traditional acoustic sound. "The Tallest Tree" is a winning tribute to Chico Mendes with spiraling guitar work by Nick Harper. Harper is also positive in the winsome "Evening Star," which finds him finally recreating his classic early-'70s sound. Harper wrote the song for Robert Plant's daughter on her wedding, and even nicked the first line of "Stairway to Heaven" as a wink to his old mate from Led Zeppelin. Perhaps the album's finest moment is the mostly instrumental tribute to Miles Davis, "Miles Remains," which is not jazzy, but sounds instead like a more guitar-oriented Clannad. But the majority of the album is very pensive and bleak, including the bizarre, weepy spoken word piece that ends the record. The album was remixed in 1999 when Harper deleted some of the more gratuitous pieces in an attempt to make the album less depressing. In any form, Death or Glory? remains one of Harper's most satisfying works, and is his only release from the '90s that most casual fans will want to own.

Customer Reviews

3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
4.5 out of 5 stars
4.5 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Simply his best album 14 April 2000
By Jason Mills VINE VOICE
Format:Audio CD
Written in the aftermath of a long relationship, the album has songs that are painfully moving and quietly beautiful. Others are raw and angry, attacking aspects of our modern world, notably the Gulf/media War and homelessness. Then there are sublime elegies for Miles Davis and Chico Mendes. It's a very varied album, yet feels more of a whole work than even his 'autobiographical' album "The Dream Society". An hour of brilliance, I defy you to find a dud song on it!
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
By A Customer
Format:Audio CD
Roy Harper has been one of this countrys' great ignored men of genius/madness in the last 40 years. Roy has been in the army, in mental institutions, in Pink Floyd for one song, in cricket teams and, on this album, in great form.
The artist doesn't rate this one as one of his greatest works (he rates his first 7-8 albums better), but I disagree. There are some great songs on here but this has never been the strong point of Roys' career, its' the message he put across that is the main point and this album is as powerful as any other Harper album. Cardboard City is a classic example.
Roy Harper is an acquire taste, he has a strange voice, a different way of playing the guitar and a quirky set of songs, but this album rewards prolonged listening.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Hard 30 Dec 2008
Format:Audio CD
It's a tough little CD this, not easy listening. Some magical little gems, but made difficult by the tracks inspired by the split from Jacqui. One for occasional listening, or to dip into for specific tracks (Miles Remains.)
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars ONCE...! 3 May 2014
Format:Audio CD
I have to take issue with the product description and your whole premise, really. First, Roy Harper does not really have "casual" fans - if anything they tend to be acolytes, fellow travelers, people who feel a spiritual affinity with Roy's work - or all the above - the people who do...love Roy Harper's work rather than 'liking' it. This is probably, at least in part, because of how under-appreciated his work has been throughout the years - especially when lesser artists have received often undue acclaim ("He's a smash!"). Also, even though, yes, 'Death or Glory' is a lovely record, it is by no means Roy's only record from the 90's that is worth immersing yourself in. 'Once' is also a beautiful record too and i saw Roy numerous times (with Angie) when he was touring at that time (early 90's) and he was great! So, i guess what i'm saying is listen to 'Once' as well (and keep an open mind) Enough. For now.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.8 out of 5 stars  4 reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Another masterpiece 26 Jun 2000
By Michael Stout - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Roy went through some heavy personal anguish around the time of this album's making, but it only adds fuel to the passion of it. The album is consistent throughout, and it's hard to identify a standout track. Roy remixed a couple of tunes and redid the cover for this one, and the revised version is actually a tad stronger, though you can't really go wrong with the first version. The re-release has a color cover of insects on a flower.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Roy's most personal album 22 Dec 2006
By Elliot Knapp - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
It's well-known that Roy Harper was left by his wife before the writing and recording of this album, and it certainly shows in the mood and subject matter of the songs. However, this isn't simply a mopey self-pity party. Harper is a true artist, and even when dealing with emotional relationship trauma he doesn't provide the stock, trite response that most musicians tend to churn out like they don't even care. Yes, Death or Glory is Roy's painful recoil in response to being burned badly by a catastrophe in his life, but he's still Roy, and there's much more to this album than sad love songs. The genuine emotion imbued in these songs because of Roy's state at the time of writing them lends this album a truly unique place in his astoundingly good catalogue and it's one of his very best records in the last 30 years.

The album opens with the torrential title track. In 2006, the production does sound a tiny bit off--Harper has favored a plugged-in acoustic sound since the mid 80's. I really prefer the sound of a miked acoustic since it sounds more natural, and the plugged-in sound bothered me at first, but has since really grown on me (probably because the writing is so good). Roy's equally-talented son Nick backs him up with some wicked lead guitar. This song has some great energy and rocks pretty hard for an acoustic-powered tune. I really love the poem excerpt in the middle. "The War Came Home Tonight" has some great political commentary that is oh-so relevant today. "Duty" is probably my very favorite of Roy's spoken-word pieces--compelling art. "Next to Me" has some awesome fingerstyle guitar that we've all come to expect from Roy.

"The Tallest Tree" and "Miles Remains," both tribute songs, are two of the album's most classic tracks. "Tree" was written for Chico Mendes, the Brazilian environmental activist. It's a great, positive, upbeat number with some great acoustic lead by Nick. "Miles Remains" is a genre-defying tribute to Miles Davis. Spacey and mostly instrumental, "Miles Remains" is a live favorite and a great use of space as music. "The Fourth World" is my favorite track of the album. It's a scathing indictment of the powers that be that's pulled off as only Roy could. Nick's acoustic lead cuts like a blade, and Roy's lyrics and fiery singing cut even deeper. The version on this CD includes better drums. Even though it's acoustic, this song rocks, and it rocks hard. "One More Tomorrow" is one of the most heartfelt and sad songs on the album, really summing up Roy's emotional state in a touching way.

A couple tracks don't stand as far out as others--"Evening Star" and "On Summer Day" aren't as musically interesting (although the lyrics are typically strong). "The Methane Zone" is really the only track that's not that great--the guitar sound just doesn't fit, and the lyric isn't quite as funny as many of Roy's earlier intentional throwaways.

Overall, though, this album is another Roy Harper classic. The singing is heartfelt and unique, the backing is tight and sometimes blazing, and the poetic writing is beautiful and worthy of much analysis. This album is highly recommended as one of his best 90's recordings alongside Once. Hope you check it out!
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Injustices, THE INJUSTICE!!! 24 Jan 2012
By Cam - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Roy Harper really deserves the fame people say he should have.

Death Or Glory? reinforces this.

To think that someone in his early 50s can produce a good "breakup" record, a haunting "breakup" record, a stone-cold classic, is in itself a miracle.

If I would recommend three Harper records to start with, this would join Stormcock and HQ.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best later albums. 22 Dec 2006
By Elliot Knapp - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
It's well-known that Roy Harper was left by his wife before the writing and recording of this album, and it certainly shows in the mood and subject matter of the songs. However, this isn't simply a mopey self-pity party. Harper is a true artist, and even when dealing with emotional relationship trauma he doesn't provide the stock, trite response that most musicians tend to churn out like they don't even care. Yes, Death or Glory is Roy's painful recoil in response to being burned badly by a catastrophe in his life, but he's still Roy, and there's much more to this album than sad love songs. The genuine emotion imbued in these songs because of Roy's state at the time of writing them lends this album a truly unique place in his astoundingly good catalogue and it's one of his very best records in the last 30 years.

The album opens with the torrential title track. In 2006, the production does sound a tiny bit off--Harper has favored a plugged-in acoustic sound since the mid 80's. I really prefer the sound of a miked acoustic since it sounds more natural, and the plugged-in sound bothered me at first, but has since really grown on me (probably because the writing is so good). Roy's equally-talented son Nick backs him up with some wicked lead guitar. This song has some great energy and rocks pretty hard for an acoustic-powered tune. I really love the poem excerpt in the middle. "The War Came Home Tonight" has some great political commentary that is oh-so relevant today. "Duty" is probably my very favorite of Roy's spoken-word pieces--compelling art. "Next to Me" has some awesome fingerstyle guitar that we've all come to expect from Roy.

"The Tallest Tree" and "Miles Remains," both tribute songs, are two of the album's most classic tracks. "Tree" was written for Chico Mendes, the Brazilian environmental activist. It's a great, positive, upbeat number with some great acoustic lead by Nick. "Miles Remains" is a genre-defying tribute to Miles Davis. Spacey and mostly instrumental, "Miles Remains" is a live favorite and a great use of space as music. "The Fourth World" is my favorite track of the album. It's a scathing indictment of the powers that be that's pulled off as only Roy could. Nick's acoustic lead cuts like a blade, and Roy's lyrics and fiery singing cut even deeper. The version on this CD includes better drums. Even though it's acoustic, this song rocks, and it rocks hard. "One More Tomorrow" is one of the most heartfelt and sad songs on the album, really summing up Roy's emotional state in a touching way.

A couple tracks don't stand as far out as others--"Evening Star" and "On Summer Day" aren't as musically interesting (although the lyrics are typically strong). "The Methane Zone" is really the only track that's not that great--the guitar sound just doesn't fit, and the lyric isn't quite as funny as many of Roy's earlier intentional throwaways.

Overall, though, this album is another Roy Harper classic. The singing is heartfelt and unique, the backing is tight and sometimes blazing, and the poetic writing is beautiful and worthy of much analysis. [...]This album is highly recommended as one of his best 90's recordings alongside Once. Hope you check it out!
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Look for similar items by category


Feedback