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Death On Blackheath (Thomas Pitt 29) Hardcover – 12 Sep 2013


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Headline (12 Sept. 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0755397177
  • ISBN-13: 978-0755397174
  • Product Dimensions: 16.2 x 2.9 x 24 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 389,147 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

With twenty million books in print throughout the world, Anne Perry's bestselling novels are noted for their memorable characters, exploration of social issues and historical accuracy. Selected by The Times as one of the twentieth century's '100 Masters of Crime', Anne lives in Scotland.

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Review

There is a freshness about [Perry's] writing which makes it truly exceptional and I was gripped until the final page. Death on Blackheath was one of the best books I've read this year and I cannot recommend it highly enough (Eurocrime)

About the Author

Anne Perry is a New York Times bestselling author noted for her memorable characters, historical accuracy and exploration of social and ethical issues. Her two series, one featuring Thomas Pitt and one featuring William Monk, have been published in multiple languages. Anne Perry has also published a successful series based around World War One and the Reavley family, and the recent standalone novel The Sheen on the Silk. Anne Perry was selected by The Times as one of the twentieth century's '100 Masters of Crime'.

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4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Mrs. Barbara Vaughan on 18 Sept. 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Anne Perry once again surpasses herself. This is an ingenious plot which takes us along a complicated path involving the security of the country which Thomas has to unravel. Along the way he has help from his family amongst others and I have so enjoyed this book. I hope you do too.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Roman Clodia TOP 100 REVIEWER on 17 Dec. 2013
Format: Hardcover
Perry is always eminently readable, and this is another engrossing novel in the Charlotte & Thomas Pitt series. Now head of Special Branch, Pitt is called in when the maid of a politically-important figure goes missing - though no-one is quite sure whether she has merely eloped or is dead. As the case deepens, Perry draws us into another complex case with both political and personal overtones.

Some writers seem to reach a point where they're writing the same book over and over again - Perry hasn't allowed herself to fall into the same trap. I generally tend to prefer the Hester & William Monk series for its darker and more intriguing characterisations, but that's personal taste. The dénouement of this does stray into unconvincing territory but there's so much good stuff here that I'm happy to forgive Perry her occasional lapses.

If you're looking for intelligent historical crime fiction with solid characterisation and a good sense of the period, Perry can always be relied upon.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By May 2010 on 24 Nov. 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Why did it take so very very very very long to achieve what should have been done in the very first place? Surely a careful background check of the Kynaston family where the presumed dead or missing maid - Kitty Ryder - should have been done. And if Pitt (and just about everyone else in the novel) suspected a particular politician - Somerset Carlisle of committing the crime (given his past propensity for using corpses to make a statement), why did they wait till almost the end before speaking to him?

I am a huge fan of Anne Perry's Thomas Pitt series, though I much prefer her earlier work prior to Pitt join Special Branch where Charlotte and her family played a much larger role in the stories. This book has just been tedious! It is slow to start, never really takes off. Goes in implausible circles about Aunt Vespasia's burgeoning love life (she has to be in her late eighties by even the most conservative estimation - esp. if you have read Pitt's earlier books), Emily's real (or imagined) marital issues, etc. It is towards the end that there is an almost unholy rush to tie up loose ends that any real work gets done.

A real detective story has never been the reason why I have read Anne Perry's Thomas (and Charlotte) Pitt series. It is her wonderful description of the individuals that populate her novels - that have evolved over time in to a delightful and familiar ensemble of recurring characters, Perry's description of the Victorian era with its complex social mores and of course Charlotte's meddling with her husband's work! This has largely dissipated from the latest novels.

Perhaps Pitt needs to take a break from Special Branch?
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Format: Hardcover
First Sentence: Pitt stood shivering on the steps leading up from the areaway to the pavement and looked down at the clumps of blood and hair at his feet.

Thomas Pitt, Commander of Special Branch, and his sideman, , has been called in to investigate a crime involving signs of a violent struggle, a missing ladies made from the hope of Dudley Kynaston, a naval weapons expert and important to the English Government. The discovery of a severely mutilated female body makes it important to discover whether this is the maid and, if not, where she is. As the investigation proceeds, it becomes clear that people, and their relationships, are not always as they seem.

A well-written hook draws you into the story, establishes Pitt’s position, role and background very quickly. This is critical for readers new to the series. It also returns Pitt much more to his previous role conducting a police investigating; something many of his fans have missed.

Perry’s descriptions create such a strong sense of place and atmosphere. Whether the characters are standing in the dark and cold, or in a warm kitchen with the smells of cooking; she immediately makes the reader part of the scene. Beyond description is the understanding Perry conveys regarding life during Victorian times. The social customs and restrictions, particularly on women, dress, manners, different types of households depending upon wealth and social strata all come to life under Ms. Perry’s deft hand.

The dialogue is excellent and conveys not only the period, but the class and area of England from which each character has come. At the same time, when she does write in dialect, it is never to where the reader has difficulty understanding the conversation.
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By J. Lesley TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 26 Mar. 2014
Format: Hardcover
How wonderful it is to return to an author I have enjoyed in the past and find that her work still has the high standards I had found in her previous books. Anne Perry has a long record of published novels but the quality has not diminished from my first experience with The Cater Street Hangman (Charlotte & Thomas Pitt Novels)]] where she began the adventures featuring Thomas Pitt and Charlotte Ellison through to this latest book. Much time has passed over the course of these novels, but Perry has maintained a very realistic feeling of warmth, love, and regard between Pitt and Charlotte and the large group of friends they have made during the course of the investigations. This novel has Pitt calling on all of them in hopes of solving the questions of murder and disappearance which seem to evade his best investigative abilities.

Thomas Pitt is now the Commander of Special Branch investigators who keep close watch on anything concerning the political welfare of the British government. When a lady's maid disappears it is indeed cause for the Special Branch to become involved because that maid worked in the household of Dudley Kynaston, a senior government official who is assigned to work with naval defenses. Kynaston is working on the new submarine systems which are expected to change the way war is carried out and his work is vitally important, especially for an island nation such as Britain. The body of the woman found close to the Kynaston home could possibly belong to the missing lady's maid, but how did she die and why was she disfigured after death?

Anne Perry was so successful in describing the biting cold and wet of this British winter that I kept making pots of hot tea to warm myself while I read.
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