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Death of a Nag (Oeb) Hardcover – Jun 1999


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Hardcover, Jun 1999
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Product details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: Oxmoor House (Jun. 1999)
  • ISBN-10: 0446930016
  • ISBN-13: 978-0446930017
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (32 customer reviews)

More About the Author

M C Beaton was born in Scotland. She worked for many years as a journalist on Fleet Street.

As well as the bestselling Agatha Raisin series, she is the author of the acclaimed Hamish Macbeth mysteries.

She divides her time between the Cotswolds, where she lives in a village very much like Agatha's beloved Carsely, and Paris.

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Review

Beaton's Hamish MacBeth stories are always good, but the latest is a standout. The plot is even better than usual, the characters are more engaging, and even the mostly dour and serious Hamish is funnier and more likable than usual. (Booklist)

Beaton has fine-tuned her MacBeth series into something altogether winning. In this 11th entry, her plot is top-notch, a few somber notes demonstrate her touch for understated compassion and, as always, Hamish and his highland cohorts are lovingly rendered. (Publishing News) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Book Description

The eleventh Hamish Macbeth mystery, beautifully republished with a brand new cover --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Kurt A. Johnson on 18 Feb. 2005
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is the eleventh in a series of mysteries featuring the detective work of small town, Highland Scottish detective Hamish Macbeth, P.C. In this story, Hamish sets out for a quiet (and cheap) vacation at the North Sea resort town of Skag. However, when he discovers the body of one of his fellow vacationers (a loud-mouthed nag of a husband), Hamish suddenly finds himself the prime suspect in a murder investigation. And so, with his faithful dog Towser in tow, Macbeth sets out to find out who caused the death of a nag.
My wife has been a big Hamish Macbeth fan for years, and she has now brought me into the fold. This was not my favorite Hamish Macbeth novel, in particular I found the ending sadly cynical, but I did enjoy reading it. I liked the setting and the characters, and think that M.C. Beaton is an excellent. So, if you are interested in a story set in modern Scotland, or just a good mystery, then I highly recommend this book to you.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Billy J. Hobbs VINE VOICE on 19 Jan. 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
In "Death of a Nag," M.C. Beaton returns with her eleventh Hamish Macbeth mystery, and he is continuing to keep Lochdubh safe and sound. And the Scottish Highlands couldn't be in better hands! Aside from his on-again, off-again romance with Priscilla Halburton-Smythe, Macbeth takes his responsibilities quite seriously (there are those in the village who think of him as lazy, no-good, and quite irresponsible for "letting" Priscilla go!). In this episode, Macbeth has taken off a few days
to "recharge his batteries," but, alas, the charming seaside resort (Friendly House) is teeming with the usual Beaton characters. Macbeth finds the company tiresome, the food inedible, and, sure enough, a body: that of one of the guests, a terrific nag. And who better is the suspect that the victim's wife, whom he publically ridiculed (and nagged!). Beaton makes sure that all of the characters are suspects (a "regular" ingredient of Beaton's works!), but only Macbeth is able to sort
out the culprit. Charming, easy-to-read, and worthwhile.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Bettie Bookworm on 1 Sept. 2009
Format: Paperback
I like M.C. Beaton's 'Agatha Raisin' the grouchy, feisty, middle-aged amateur detective, but I find the Hamish Mcbeth books even more enjoyable. If you want a 'serious' crime novel, look elsewhere, but if you are out for a lighthearted, often tongue-in-cheek whodunnit, this series is for you!
In 'Death of a Nag' we follow Hamish on a coastal holiday to get away from the villagers' disapproval of his break-up with Priscilla. But, of course holiday it is not - before he knows it Hamish finds himself involved in a case of murder amongst his fellow lodgers in a cheap, but sadly not cheerful B&B. Red herrings, side plots and human nature make for an entertaining read. And the ending is truly and wickedly malicious! Well done again, M.C. Beaton!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mrs. A. L. Maddocks on 1 Jan. 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is only the second Hamish McBeth book I've read and I must say I shall be buying more.

If you are looking for a nice relaxing read then this is the book for you. Whilst this is a light read, it isn't boring and it will hold your attention.

Hamish McBeth comes through as a really caring character in so much as he's the one who suggests different things to do for the other guests and himself to do, and when everybody gets questioned after the murder he feels rather guilty in that he feels that the fellow holiday makers are his friends and doesn't like to see them go through police questioning.

It reminds me of the Agatha Christie books where the murderer is the least person you would expect it to be.

Good read will be reading more.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Lawyeraau HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWER on 6 Mar. 2012
Format: Paperback
Poor Constable Hamish Macbeth, as if it were not bad enough that he has been demoted, his engagement to the coolly beautiful Priscilla Halburton-Smythe is over, and the villagers of Lochdubh all blame him for the break-up. In hopes of putting some distance between himself and the villagers' hostility, Hamish decides to go on a holiday to the northern seaside village of Skag.

Hamish decides to stay at the Friendly boarding house, which is anything but that. There, Hamish endures unpleasant hosts who serve inedible food, as well as a motley crew of fellow guests. Of course, this would not be a mystery if someone were not murdered. So, it is no surprise when one of his fellow vacationers, an unpleasant fellow who delights in berating his fellow man, is the one to meet his maker. Unfortunately, Hamish becomes the number one suspect, given the fact that just prior to the victim's death, Hamish had an altercation with him.

This is the eleventh book in a series of cozy mysteries featuring lovable Highlander, Hamish Macbeth. The book is also laced with sly humor throughout that is engaging, keeping the mood of the book light and highly enjoyable. As with all cozy mysteries, it is not so much the mystery that is of import but the characters that revolve around the mystery. While the mysteries are intriguing, they are the framework around which the characters evolve. With the oddly endearing Hamish Macbeth, the author has created a character that keeps his many fans looking forward to the next book in the series.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mr. D. L. Rees TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 8 July 2011
Format: Paperback
Doubleglazing salesman Bob Harris is the nag, alienating all at the seedy Skag hotel where PC Hamish Macbeth is on holiday. Long suffering fellow guests wish him dead. Soon he is found, battered and drowned - Hamish himself one of the suspects.

So who is the culprit? Bob's bullied wife; her admirer; the dodgy proprietors; the former schoolmistress; the two teenage girls with attitude (and police records); the seemingly happily married couple with their three children? Secrets abound, with motives increasing. It is fun trying to identify the culprit.

The book's greatest strength, as ever, is Hamish himself. By nature easy going, he longs for a quiet life. When circumstances dictate, he rises to the challenge. Once all is done, he gratefully retires into the background - content that others, less worthy, take credit for what he achieved.

Another strength is the description of northern Scotland's remote villages. Transformed by the car, so many are losing their individuality and charm. Pubs and eating places are becoming cheap and nasty, and what need of shops with supermarkets so near?

In contrast, Hamish's own village - Lochdubh - is portrayed with affection. In fact this eleventh novel is likely to be most remembered for how its residents react to some very sad news. Hard-hearted the reader who is not genuinely moved! (It has to be said, though, this demise puzzles a little. So easily and effectively it could have been an integral part of the investigation, the result of a dastardly deed, but it comes out of the blue - not really fitting in.)

Hamish addicts will know what to expect and should be well pleased. Newcomers may quickly be seeking other books in the series. There are lots, they will be happy to learn.

Gentle entertainment which beguiles - recommended.
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