Trade in your item
Get a £3.43
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Death on the Installment Plan (ND Paperbook) Paperback – 1 Feb 1971


See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£9.49
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"

Trade In Promotion



Trade In this Item for up to £3.43
Trade in Death on the Installment Plan (ND Paperbook) for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £3.43, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Paperback: 592 pages
  • Publisher: New Directions; New edition edition (1 Feb. 1971)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0811200175
  • ISBN-13: 978-0811200172
  • Product Dimensions: 13.2 x 4.6 x 20.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 235,219 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Celine, Louis-Ferdinand

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
Here we are, alone again. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
5 star
7
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 8 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Delvis Memphistopheles TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 16 Sept. 2009
Format: Paperback
What existed before Celine in terms of literature?

He is the antithesis of the Bronte sisters, more visceral than Dickens, a greater understanding of human psychology than Shakespeare and more condeming than Goethe. Celine was Trotsky's favourite author.

He is a man so in touch with his bile duct he wrecked his legacy with his descent into anti semitism deemed even too Xtreme for the Nazi's with the publication of his "Bagatelles". "Death" catches him in moments of lucidity as he reflects on the life of the petty bourgeois. Celine prods and pokes his memories and howls at the hypocrisy of the world swirling around him.

Whilst Conrad expresses an ambivalence about colonialism in Heart of Darkness, Celine paints a Bosch like caricature of Euro decadence where at least the indigenous black population resisted the fraud perpetrated on them contrasting this with the white colonialists hastily consuming with envious greed all resources available to them whilst lauding their own alledged superiority. Oblivious to their incipient anhilation at the mandibles of the local parasites withn two years of arrival.

Celine deconstructed the madness of the 1st War by standing back and asking why his former school friends were out to kill him? Celine the frenchman went to school in Germany as part of his broader education. He also spent school time in the UK.

Stupidity was his bete noir, along with any form of pretense which included war. All were machine gunned into mush before his macabre wit. Even the books written whilst he was gaining safe passage through Germany highlight his ability to deconstruct the Nazi charade.

Andre Gide described the "Bagatelles" as someone trying to out excess the greatest bigot.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 29 April 1998
Format: Paperback
Though not as consistent as "journey to the End of the NIght", "Death..." is where Celine perfects his style, a scattershot volley of sincere human emotion. "Sincere" is the right word; Celine never wrote a line that approached the glibness and superficiality of postmodern writing, and yet his best work (though most of it was written in the 1930s) continues to erode the facade of lies that the 20th century has erected over reality. His passages on a childhood filled with with petty soulessness ring true even in our time, and his never wavering cynicism reveals his most subtle quality; compassion, or, more accurately, an empathy for those who do not fit and yet struggle to live the best life they can under the immutable, spirit-crushing reality thay are born into. In a few words, a transcripted nightmare we all share. A wothy companion to "Journey", although its long-windedness makes it salighty inferior. And that's still a high compliment. Read "Journey" first, then settle down with "Death." Highly recommended for a rainy, raw day.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By frapatroo on 20 Feb. 2010
Format: Paperback
This is a brilliantly vicious depiction of what it's like to struggle to earn a miserable living in lowly, tenuous jobs, finding whatever pleasure wherever one can. It's a bit like if Charles Dickens got drunk and wrote a filthy, flow of conscience novel.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By A Customer on 18 May 1997
Format: Paperback
A tougher read than Journey to the End of the Night, Death on the Installment Plan is nonetheless a wonderful example of the essence of Celine. The portrait of the young Fernand's childhood in working-class Paris slums is shattering in its filth and despair, but one gets the feeling that the wily young scamp likes it that way. Death on the Installment Plan approaches the pain of sexual awakening, the struggle to make a living, and the need to leave a mark with a sly wink - after all, as the author subtly reminds us, the slate is wiped clean in the end.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback