Death in the Clouds (Poirot) (Hercule Poirot Series Book 12) and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
  • RRP: £7.99
  • You Save: £2.00 (25%)
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books.
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Death in the Clouds (Poir... has been added to your Basket
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by the book house
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: The book has been read, but is in excellent condition. Pages are intact and not marred by notes or highlighting. The spine remains undamaged.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Death in the Clouds (Poirot) Paperback – 3 Mar 2008


See all 74 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£5.99
£2.84 £0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
£10.00
£5.99 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books. In stock. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Death in the Clouds (Poirot) + Three Act Tragedy (Poirot) + Murder in Mesopotamia (Poirot)
Price For All Three: £19.97

Buy the selected items together


Discover More Agatha Christie
Visit our Agatha Christie Store to discover more titles by this author.

Product details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins; Masterpiece Ed edition (3 Mar. 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 000711933X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0007119332
  • Product Dimensions: 11.1 x 2.2 x 17.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (33 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 50,071 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Born in Torquay in 1890, Agatha Christie began writing during the First World War and wrote over 100 novels, plays and short story collections. She was still writing to great acclaim until her death, and her books have now sold over a billion copies in English and another billion in over 100 foreign languages. Yet Agatha Christie was always a very private person, and though Hercule Poirot and Miss Marple became household names, the Queen of Crime was a complete enigma to all but her closest friends.

Product Description

Review

“It will be a very acute reader who does not receive a complete surprise at the end.”
Times Literary Supplement

Book Description

But Hercule Poirot is also on the flight and his discovery of a poisoned dark leads him to believe that the wasp did not cause her death.

Poirot has a large cast of characters to choose from in this ‘locked-room’ mystery and working with Scotland Yard and the Sûreté he sets out to discover the truth in his own very methodical way.

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Mary Whipple HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on 11 Sept. 2006
Format: Paperback
Agatha Christie sells herself short with this remark--the most interesting thing about this case is the fun that Christie herself has with the mystery! Setting up a "closed room" murder, which in this case takes place on an airplane traveling between Paris and Croyden, she plays with the reader's expectations, parodies the exotic murders in other mysteries of the period, and provides a large cast of easily remembered characters whose lives come under scrutiny for their possible relationship with the deceased.

The victim is Mme. Giselle, a French money-lender who ensures repayment by keeping a black book of blackmail information. When she is killed with a poisoned dart shot from a blowpipe while the plane is in the air, no one, including Hecule Poirot, sees the murder take place. Poirot teams up with Inspector Japp to interview the passengers--a motley assortment, including a pair of French archaeologists, a London doctor, a mystery writer (a hack who finds real murder even more exciting than his own novels), a young hairdresser on vacation, a dentist, and the actress wife of an English lord, a woman who is a compulsive gambler.

Christie's ingénue, Jane Grey, the hairdresser, is attracted to both the dentist (Norman Gale) and to the younger of the archaeologists (Jean Dupont), providing some warmth and emotional connection in this mystery, and two of the passengers work with Poirot to try to solve the mystery. How did someone use a blowpipe to kill Mme Giselle without being seen? How would someone get the rare snake venom used on the tip of the dart? Who is Mme Giselle's daughter, a girl brought up in an orphanage in England? Which of those on whom Mme Giselle had blackmail information had an opportunity to kill her?
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Eric Watson on 3 Feb. 2009
Format: Paperback
'Death in the Clouds' was written in 1935 and as such one might well think it would be rather dated. Not a bit of it, in fact, after reading it I was very surprised to find it was so long ago. In it Agatha Christie does a 'Houdini' type trick by confining a murder to a passenger section on an aircraft going to Croydon from Le Bourgot Airport.As it happened Hercule Poirot was on board and immediately to his embarassment even became a suspect.However it was a mytery suitable to his preference for sitting and thinking things out..giving so few possibilities this was not easy.. yet he comes up with several ingenious ideas and of course the correct answer which evaded me until end.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Androo TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 4 Nov. 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
In its time, I expect the thought of Poirot flying in the air liner Prometheus (albeit to Croydon) was quite exotic. It certainly makes a change from country houses, though the plot does turn to the odd country house later on.
It's not too difficult to guess what didn't happen in this mystery, but not that easy to guess what actually did happen. Having said that, I wasn't too surprised to find out who did it.
Not that this really matters in one of Agatha Christie's novels. The point is that it's an entertaining read, with a few good characters including inspector Japp, and Poirot doing his stuff.
The book loses its way a little in the middle when we go on a visit with the various suspects and witness some pretty vacuous 'romance' writing.
On the whole though, it's up to the usual standard, has a couple of trips to Paris thrown in, and a court scene.
These facsimile editions are just what they say: perfect copies of the originals. So perfect that they have to have an extra dust jacket with the barcode and 2008 price. They are very nicely done, though by no means 'luxury' versions. I like them because they're a great size to hold and look good on the shelf if you buy a few.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Jay Gregory on 16 Feb. 2008
Format: Paperback
Death in the Clouds is classic Christie: a closed group of suspects, an ingenious plot, and some extra fun for fans in the shape of one character, Daniel Clancy, a detective novelist who hates his most famous creation, an irritating Finnish sleuth, which bears some resemblance to Christie's feelings for Poirot. Most importantly, the plot is tight, and the solution all but unguessable. There's even a little emotional resonance to round off the light-hearted exercise in solving a seemingly impossible murder.

Inceidentally, unlike some readers, I don't think the story would be improved by having all the action take place on the plane - more to the point, the setting ought to provide clues for a careful reader.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Helen S VINE VOICE on 24 Jun. 2011
Format: Paperback
Death in the Clouds, first published in 1935, is one of Agatha Christie's many novels featuring the Belgian detective Hercule Poirot.

Ten people are travelling on a plane flying from Paris to London. During the flight a woman is found dead in her seat - apparently a murder has taken place without anyone seeing it happen. Among the other passengers is Poirot, who can't believe a crime has taken place right under his nose! The mystery proves a difficult one to solve and after landing in England the suspects are allowed to go back to their everyday lives. As Poirot continues to investigate, he uncovers some secrets about the murdered woman and discovers that more than one of her fellow passengers had a reason to want her dead...

Like many classic mysteries, the crime takes place in a confined space so that we know from the beginning who the suspects are. The fact that this novel is set on a plane makes a nice change from the usual country house! The suspects include a beautiful aristocrat with a cocaine addiction, two prominent archaeologists, a doctor, a dentist, a businessman, a hairdresser - and my personal favourite, a crime novelist, whose inclusion gives Christie a chance to have some fun at the expense of her own genre. The characters don't have a lot of depth and there are only a few that we get to know well, yet Christie makes it easy to remember who is who. There are plenty of red herrings to make the reader suspect first one person and then another; it's even possible that Poirot himself could have committed the murder!

I enjoyed studying the seating plan at the front of the book and the list of the contents of the passengers' luggage in an attempt to work out what had happened - but as usual, I didn't even come close to solving the mystery.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback