or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Tell the Publisher!
I’d like to read this book on Kindle

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Dead Man's Share (An Inspector Llob Mystery) [Paperback]

Yasmina Khadra
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
RRP: £8.99
Price: £7.64 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Details
You Save: £1.35 (15%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Want it tomorrow, 26 Oct.? Choose Express delivery at checkout. Details

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback £7.64  
MP3 CD, Audiobook --  

Book Description

27 Feb 2012
Superintendent Brahim Llob is bored. Nothing seems to need his attention in an unusually peaceful Algiers. Then suddenly peace is shatterd in ways Llob could never have imagined. His subordinate, Lieutenant Lino, falls for an entirely unsuitable woman, and is devastated when she returns to a previous lover, the wealthy and influential Haj Thobane. Thobane survives an attempted murder that kills his chauffeur and Lino's gun is found at the scene. With Lino languishing in prison, it is up to Llob to face down the corrupt echelons of the Algerian goverment to find the truth about what happened the night of the murder. The search will take the world-weary Llob down avenues even he has never encountered and will force him to delve into his beloved country's brutal past.

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Between 20-26 October 2014, spend £10 in a single order on item(s) dispatched from and sold by Amazon.co.uk and receive a £2 promotional code to spend in the Amazon Appstore. Here's how (terms and conditions apply)

Frequently Bought Together

Dead Man's Share (An Inspector Llob Mystery) + Double Blank (Inspector Llob Mystery) + Morituri (Toby Crime)
Price For All Three: £22.71

Some of these items are dispatched sooner than the others.

Buy the selected items together


Product details

  • Paperback: 404 pages
  • Publisher: AmazonCrossing (27 Feb 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1611091055
  • ISBN-13: 978-1611091052
  • Product Dimensions: 20.8 x 14 x 2.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,623,682 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

"Yasmina Khadra is one of the rare writers capable of giving a meaning to the violence in Algeria today." - Newsweek. "A writer who can understand man wherever he is..." - New York Times." --New York Times --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt
Search inside this book:

Sell a Digital Version of This Book in the Kindle Store

If you are a publisher or author and hold the digital rights to a book, you can sell a digital version of it in our Kindle Store. Learn more

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Customer Reviews

4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
5.0 out of 5 stars
5.0 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
By Mary Whipple HALL OF FAME TOP 100 REVIEWER
Format:Paperback
(4.5 stars) Twenty-five years after Algeria's independence from France, the country is still suffering from political instability, corruption, and the residual rivalries and hatreds between those who supported French rule during the war (1954 - 1962) and the FLN and other groups, socialist and otherwise, which fought for independence. The devastated economy at the end of the war has not improved, people are living in poverty, religious fundamentalism is growing, the young have no future, and citizens everywhere are casting jaded eyes on those who reek of success.

In this newest installment of the Inspector Llob series, chronologically the "pre-quel" to the series, set in 1988, author Yasmina Khadra (in reality, a male Algerian army officer/writer who moved to France in 2000) turns a spotlight on Algeria's crumbling country and its demoralized citizens. Superintendent Llob, also a writer, is an honest police official who does not compromise. Smart-mouthed, with a cynical sense of humor and an understanding of the ironies of everyday life, Llob manages to stay afloat in the murky waters of Algerian bureaucracy. His assistant, Lieutenant Lino, is absent as this novel opens. He has fallen in love with a gorgeous woman, and as a result, he is spending lavishly on his clothes and appearance, calling in sick when he is not ill, and creating disturbances while drunk. In the meantime, SNP, an urepentant serial killer with no family name, has received a presidential pardon and is about to be released after spending seven years in an asylum and additional years in jail, and Llob cannot stop the release.

When the chauffeur of an influential Algiers bigwig is shot to death with Lino's gun, Lino is arrested and kept incommunicado, even from Llob.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars Entertaining 4 Oct 2013
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
I first thought that it was the translators of his works that perhaps made reading him interesting and entertaining but this novel translated by another person still held my attention. My mind has been made up long time ago about Yasmina Khadra. He is my favourite writer
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.8 out of 5 stars  4 reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Of all the hydra-headed monsters, man is the only one that knows how to cross the line into animalism while remaining lucid." 7 Oct 2009
By Mary Whipple - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
(4.5 stars) Twenty-five years after Algeria's independence from France, the country is still suffering from political instability, corruption, and the residual rivalries and hatreds between those who supported French rule during the war (1954 - 1962) and the FLN and other groups, socialist and otherwise, which fought for independence. The devastated economy at the end of the war has not improved, people are living in poverty, religious fundamentalism is growing, the young have no future, and citizens everywhere are casting jaded eyes on those who reek of success.

In this newest installment of the Inspector Llob series, chronologically the "pre-quel" to the series, set in 1988, author Yasmina Khadra (in reality, a male Algerian army officer/writer who moved to France in 2000) turns a spotlight on Algeria's crumbling country and its demoralized citizens. Superintendent Llob, also a writer, is an honest police official who does not compromise. Smart-mouthed, with a cynical sense of humor and an understanding of the ironies of everyday life, Llob manages to stay afloat in the murky waters of Algerian bureaucracy. His assistant, Lieutenant Lino, is absent as this novel opens. He has fallen in love with a gorgeous woman, and as a result, he is spending lavishly on his clothes and appearance, calling in sick when he is not ill, and creating disturbances while drunk. In the meantime, SNP, an urepentant serial killer with no family name, has received a presidential pardon and is about to be released after spending seven years in an asylum and additional years in jail, and Llob cannot stop the release.

When the chauffeur of an influential Algiers bigwig is shot to death with Lino's gun, Lino is arrested and kept incommunicado, even from Llob. Additional murders, suggesting connections to the war-time past, send Llob to rural Sidi Ba with journalist/history professor Soria Karadach, a researcher studying atrocities which occurred in August, 1962, the month following the end of the war. A horrendous massacre occurred in Sidi Ba, and Llob interviews harkis (Muslim Algerians who worked with the French), maquisards (guerrillas who also worked with the French Resistance), mujahids, and people claiming to be members of the FLN, socialist "freedom-fighters," to learn more about the massacre and those who might have been responsible.

Eventually, the events of Sidi Ba and the arrest of Lino converge, and though the details of the plot are extremely complex, the novel is carefully constructed, and the mystery is satisfactorily resolved. Khadra creates well-developed characters, endowing them with human failings and often giving them a kind of dark humor which allows them to survive the violence and irrationality of everyday life in Algiers. His unique imagery gives depth to the atmosphere: A road is "orphaned by the loss of its paving stones," while a light rain "weeps into the city." Multiple levels of betrayal all contribute to the darkest of noir fiction and a vision of Algiers which makes one want to weep for the victims. For those who enjoy complex mysteries set in unusual locations with main characters one comes to care about, this mystery is both challenging and enlightening. n Mary Whipple

Morituri (Toby Crime), US pub. date 2003
Double Blank: An Inspector Llob Mystery (Toby Crime), US pub. date 2005
Autumn of the Phantoms, US pub. date 2006
5.0 out of 5 stars A Yasmina Khadra novel 16 July 2013
By Larysa Mykyta - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
I loved it because it is beautifully written yet a fascinating detective novel and at the same time time a mordant depiction and condemnation of the realities and corruption in contemporary Algeria. Would recommend it to anyone who likes a good story, irony and social critique all rolled into one.
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Complex, involving, engaging, excellent 20 July 2010
By David W. Nicholas - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Yasmina Khadra is an Algerian author, the pseudonym of a relatively senior Algerian army officer named Mohammed Moulessehoul. When he started writing he was still in the army, and so he adopted the pseudonym to avoid trouble in his country. Back then, reviewers and readers were uncertain even of the gender of the author, and certainly no one knew his identity.

He wrote short, serious, sharp books, some of them detective stories, others examining fanaticism and religious intolerance. At some point he went into exile in France, and revealed his name to the world. While he was still incognito, however, he wrote three mystery novels which followed the adventures of Supt. Brahim Llob, a malcontent who works as a senior police officer in Algiers. He's a veteran of Algeria's war for independence, which ended in the early 60's, so he has to be pretty old, but he's stubborn and at times energetic as he pursues justice wherever the case leads him. The books are short, really novellas, but they're very good anyway, even if they're not constructed exactly to Western tastes.

So flash forward a decade. Khadra is now established as an author, and he has more things to say. He ended the Llob series in such a fashion that he can't write a sequel, so he instead writes a prequel, a much longer book. I expect that someone at the publisher told him that a longer, more complex, plot-driven novel would reach a wider audience, and I certainly hope it does. Dead Man's Share is longer and more complex, yes, but it's also a much better novel. The author's disgust with the leadership of his country is palpable here, as it was in his previous books, but the addition of a serious plot that actually works makes the book much more readable and interesting.

So the book starts with Llob worrying about his subordinate, Lieutenant Lino. Lino's a bit of a naif, and he's been seduced by a beautiful woman. He's making a fool of himself, borrowing money he can't repay from everyone in the station house to buy gifts and clothes and meals he can't afford, all to impress this young woman. When her lover shows up unexpectedly and it turns out Lino was just being used by the lady to stir jealousy in her boyfriend's heart, Lino pretty much falls to pieces. The next thing anyone knows, Lino's in jail, accused of trying to kill the boyfriend, and of course the boyfriend is really a very powerful old man with a lot of friends in high places.

Meanwhile, Llob is also approached by a university professor he knows. The man teaches psychology, and he also treats patients. One particular one, a serial killer no one ever properly identified, is about to be freed by Presidential pardon. The professor is worried that if the man is pardoned and he's allowed to wander around free, he'll go back to killing. He's hoping Llob can do something to keep the prisoner in jail, or failing that maybe Llob can watch the man and prevent a repetition of the earlier crimes. Llob duly tries to prevent the release, fails, and then has the man watched, with disastrous results. Eventually the two plots converge, and things get even murkier, as Llob is unsure who he can trust. Eventually the answer turns out to be almost no one.

I really enjoyed this novel, with all of its cynicism and jaded disgust at the political climate of the era. Imagine an Arab Raymond Chandler, with more philosophical overtones than Chandler perhaps but still, a Chandler, and you have an idea of what Khadra's writing is like. Highly recommended.
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars good suspenseful foreign detective story 25 Mar 2012
By Dave - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
I had to get this book for a required writing class last semester.
All the characters are carefully crafted throughout this book. The feel of each scene is nicely conveyed to the reader as the author describes in detail how the characters react while walking down certain neighborhoods. Inspector Llob is easily a likable character in this book. He is unique in that there are moments where he is afraid but he still dares to move ahead if he believes he is onto something good and doing the right thing, this bravery you expect to find in a young action hero but Llob is actually a family man who is past his physical prime, all this makes Llob an every man's hero which gives him appeal. Llob is also in your face as he will tell it as it is and that usually ends up making people angry.
Even though this book is fiction it tries to convey to the reader that there are real issues of corruption in Algeria and the people who try to fight this corruption are massively overpowered but there is hope when there is even one person fighting.
I took one star off because it didn't fully explain the side characters background enough. small details make big stories.

last impressions on this book: I was suppose to "learn" something about Algeria with this book according to my professor, however what i took away was a great detective story. I usually stay away from detective stories because they are usually predictable (i'm more of a science fiction reader), but this book was exceptionally suspenseful, raw, and memorable. This book also is different in that it is in a foreign environment, with different street rules and government laws making this slightly more appealing since i like different environments.
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback