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Dazzle Ships Original recording remastered, Extra tracks


Price: £7.83 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.
Does not apply to gift orders. See Terms and Conditions for important information about costs that may apply for the MP3 version in case of returns and cancellations.
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
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£7.83 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details Only 3 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

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Frequently Bought Together

Dazzle Ships + Architecture & Morality + Organisation
Price For All Three: £22.22

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Product details

  • Audio CD (3 Mar. 2008)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Original recording remastered, Extra tracks
  • Label: EMI
  • ASIN: B0013E4D9G
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (44 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 64,886 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Listen to Samples and Buy MP3s

Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Samples
Song Title Time Price
  1. Radio Prague (2008 Digital Remaster) 1:18£0.99  Buy MP3 
  2. Genetic Engineering (2008 Digital Remaster) 3:37£0.99  Buy MP3 
  3. ABC Auto-Industry (2008 Digital Remaster) 2:06£0.99  Buy MP3 
  4. Telegraph (2008 Digital Remaster) 2:55£0.99  Buy MP3 
  5. This Is Helena (2008 Digital Remaster) 1:57£0.99  Buy MP3 
  6. International (2008 Digital Remaster) 4:25£0.99  Buy MP3 
  7. Dazzle Ships (Parts II, III And VII) (2008 Digital Remaster) 2:21£0.99  Buy MP3 
  8. The Romance Of The Telescope (2008 Digital Remaster) 3:25£0.99  Buy MP3 
  9. Silent Running (2008 Digital Remaster) 3:32£0.99  Buy MP3 
10. Radio Waves (2008 Digital Remaster) 3:44£0.99  Buy MP3 
11. Time Zones (2008 Digital Remaster) 1:49£0.99  Buy MP3 
12. Of All The Things We've Made (2008 Digital Remaster) 3:26£0.99  Buy MP3 
13. Telegraph (The Manor Version 1981) 3:25£0.99  Buy MP3 
14. 4-Neu (2008 Digital Remaster) 3:32£0.99  Buy MP3 
15. Genetic Engineering (312MM Version) 5:09£0.99  Buy MP3 
16. 66 And Fading (2008 Digital Remaster) 6:31£0.99  Buy MP3 
17. Telegraph (Extended Version) (2008 Digital Remaster) 5:36£0.99  Buy MP3 
18. Swiss Radio International 1:03£0.99  Buy MP3 

Product Description

Product Description

1. Radio Prague
2. Genetic Engineering
3. ABC Auto-Industry
4. Telegraph
5. This Is Helena
6. International
7. Dazzle Ships (Parts II, III And VII)
8. The Romance Of The Telescope
9. Silent Running
10. Radio Waves
11. Time Zones
12. Of All The Things We've Made
13. Telegraph
14. 4-Neu
15. Genetic Engineering
16. 66 And Fading
17. Telegraph (Extended Version)
18. Swiss Radio International

BBC Review

Oh, 1983 was a queer spring for rock and pop. Groups that remained true to their innovative roots challenged their audiences. Some survived and took their crowd with them, some were savagely scorned. March of that year was, in particular, rather odd. Before David Bowie rode in and offered some form of rationalisation with Let's Dance, it was a very eccentric landscape. New Order had just gone disco with Blue Monday, Pink Floyd released the moribund and overwrought The Final Cut and OMD issued the frankly rather strange Dazzle Ships.

OMD had always been a bit odd, though. There was little doubting their sincerity or their credentials, but in the end, they always looked as if they were fronted by Keith Harris dancing very badly at the office party. So when they turned up at the peak of their success with an album bereft of melody but long on east European sound effects, it was somewhat difficult to latch on to.

Let's be honest, there had been some precedent - their previous album, the chart smash, Architecture And Morality, had hardly been long on laughs. But this was bizarre. Borne out of the writer's block they had experienced after the global success of their previous album, Dazzle Ships took its predecessor's pitch black elements and somehow made them darker. Inspired by the 1919 painting by Edward Wadsworth, Dazzle Ships In Drydock At Liverpool, the album clicked and whirred; with its found voices and political undercurrents, there was little here for pop fans to sink their teeth into.

Although the 1981 outtake, Telegraph, was a sop to pop audiences, ABC Auto Industry referenced Syd Barrett-era Floyd, with its childlike repetition and sound effects. The inclusion of 18-month old B-sides (Romance Of The Telescope, Of All The Things We've Made) suggested a degree of artistic bankruptcy, as well. ''Dazzle Ships is a strange LP'' Andy McCluskey suggests today ''because obviously it was possibly the lowest selling album that we ever released and yet I am inordinately proud of it. Maybe we did something that was commercial suicide, but we did that album for the right reasons. It has a painful beauty''. Painful, it is, at times (how many times would anyone want to hear its title track). Yet beautiful it is too: Very, very much so. --Daryl Easlea

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

37 of 37 people found the following review helpful By yangtze on 14 Nov. 2010
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Once these Dazzle Ships were shiny and new, raising their proud pæans against the world and his or her dog, and boldly going where no sampler had gone before. Now do these vessels lie rusting on the scrap heap of musical history? Were they mere folly all along? A silly diversion best turned to plantpots like Grandad's 78s?

Listen to this:

"It was a crashing disaster." Andy McCluskey, Vox, July '93
"...the whole concept of the album lacked vision and cohesion." J. Waller / M. Humphreys, Messages (the official biography), 1987
"...shorter tracks... frustrating irritations..." Messages again.

Even it's creators, perhaps in a conscious or unconscious effort to retain credibility with an apparently hostile public, denied it thrice.

Messages suggests the `failure' of the album was due to a confused record buying public. Was the album synth-pop or was it avant-garde? This of course is twaddle. People don't buy albums because they are a `cohesive end product'. Some buy albums because they saw and liked the band live, but that's a relatively small number of people most of whom are already converts. Some buy because the songs have had lots of exposure on the radio, thanks to a very small but powerful group of DJs. Others buy because a very small but powerful group of reviewers have said nice things about the album. Neither of the latter things happened in the case of Dazzle Ships, hence low sales.

O.K., so low sales don't prove an album is bilge-water, but can we ever prove that Dazzle Ships isn't bilge-water? Aha, here we've hit the conundrum, since the whole thing about art of any kind is that, of course, there is no good or bad. Art is purely subjective.
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on 26 May 2007
Format: Audio CD
I was looking through some old cassettes, when I suddenly had to change my all time top ten albums. I had completely forgotten a work of pure genius ... Dazzle Ships. Instantly I was taken back to Hammersmith Odeon where I witnessed an astonishing show that (if my memory hasn't mistaken me) started with the band using semaphore flags to sign off A B C, A B C, A B C. Truly wonderful.

But what an album. Misunderstood by many, worshipped by few, Dazzle Ships not only broke the rules, but doused them in petrol and set them ablaze. With no hits or radio friendly pop tunes, the album was destined to commercially sink like the Titanic. But to those that could (and still can) appreciate what McCluskey and Co. crafted into each of the 12 masterpieces, we have been blessed and privileged to bask in its splendor. Whilst others just scratch their heads and wonder what on earth was going on.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Jason Parkes #1 HALL OF FAME on 19 Jun. 2007
Format: Audio CD
Released on the fake-indie label 'Telegraph' in 1983, 'Dazzle Ships' was a bold release from the band then known as Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark, who would later be known more often as OMD and have more overt, slick 80s pop hits. Locomotion...the sappy If You Leave from Pretty in Pink...the quite charming Forever (Live and Die)...and the Personal Jesus-tribute Sailing on the Seven Seas. Running jokes regarding an LP called 'Architecture & Morality' (the second series of 'I'm Alan Partridge') and Andy McCluskey's "geography dancer" qualities (Mary Whitehouse Experience) hasn't helped things. I find this bizarre, since a critically lauded band like New Order have made records that sound like OMD ('All Day Long') and made far less experimental stuff.

Like Simple Minds, if you focus on the early years of this band, you'll find something quite different. OMD had their roots in an earlier line up of the band known as The Id ('Radio Waves' apparently stems from that) and the Humphreys/McCluskey outfits VCL XI, whose name stemmed from the cover of Radioactivity by Kraftwerk (the track VCL XI featured on second LP 'Organisation'); as well as an association with Dalek I Love You. From the 'Electricity' single released on Factory, to their first three albums on DinDisc and this LP on Telegraph, the band known as Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark were pop, pioneering, cool, and all the other things you probably don't hear about them now (Sadly I've missed their latest tour thus far and will have to go to either Oxford or Cardiff to catch the Greatest Hits/A&M tour!).

I'm not sure 'Kid A' is really that good a comparison, I'm sure I made a similar analogy to Radiohead's 2000 LP in relation to Real to Real Cacophony by Simple Minds.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By P. F. Yardley on 17 Nov. 2008
Format: Audio CD
This album was a commercial disappointment following the huge success of the bands previous (third) LP 'Architecture & Morality'. I bought it when it was first released back in the early/mid eighties and found it quite difficult to get into. With its re-release this year with the added tracks (following the re-release with bonus tracks of the first three albums) it's brought the album to my attention again. Having re-listened to it a number of times I believe this is possibly the bands best work. It could almost be considered a concept album where the tracks each seem part of the 'complete' album. McClusky's vocals are pushed to the limit on my favorite track 'International' amongst others. Its a difficult package of songs (and noises) to describe but somehow seems to combine together perfectly, listened to with an open mind and without bias to previous recordings, a truely masterful album.
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