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Days Of Future Passed (Digitally Remastered)

Days Of Future Passed (Digitally Remastered)

14 Jul 2009

£6.93 (VAT included if applicable)

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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 1 Jan 1967
  • Release Date: 1 Jan 1967
  • Label: UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)
  • Copyright: (C) 1997 Decca Music Group Limited
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 41:31
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001KUYGEU
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (66 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 35,526 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

35 of 37 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 1 Jan 2003
Format: Audio CD
"Days of Future Passed" has one of the stranger stories behind the birth of an album in rock history. In 1967 Deram Records, part of the Decca label, wanted to promote its new Deramic Stereo process and tapped the Moody Blues to do a rock version of Dvorak's "New World Symphony." However, instead of putting together something that would anticipate Emerson, Lake & Palmer's live performance of Mussorgsky's "Pictures at an Exhibition," the group persuaded the powers that be to abandon the Dvorak idea and let them do their own original compositions. Obviously inspired by the Beatle's "Sgt. Pepper," the result was a concept album presenting an archetypal day from "The Day Begins" to "Nights in White Satin" and essentially became the first major salvo in the Progressive Rock movement. This is another album that benefits from being on CD because as an album or cassette Side 2, with "Tuesday Afternoon" and "Nights in White Satin," was going to be listened to a lot more. Both those songs were written and sung by Justin Hayward, who had just joined the band in the wake of Denny Laine's departure. The fusion of rock and classical music works well overall, mainly because the pretentiousness of the songs was offset by the stunningly beautiful orchestrations by Peter Knight. Arguably the Moody Blues never scaled these grand heights again and in one significant sense they never tried: after "Days of Future Passed" the orchestra was replaced by a Mellotron on their albums. But what would become part of the Moody Blue's music that would continue were the deep thoughts profoundly intoned by Graeme Edge, which certainly gave this album one of the most unusual endings in rock history. I think this album still stands up today; if it does not, then it surely takes me back to a time when it did. So there.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Martin A Hogan HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 8 Jan 2003
Format: Audio CD
This is the hallmark recording that started the Moody Blues on their sojourn and it is a remarkable one at that. This grouping brought in John Lodge and Justin Hayward maximizing the songwriting and vocal harmonizing that is so well known now. Although the symphonic arrangments may sound slightly dated, it is still a 'mood-piece' to wash away your worries and dive into your dreams. "Night In White Satin" was released in 1967 and 1971 as a single, so strong is it's appeal. The other songs display how talented and unafraid these musicians were to experiment, bringing classical pop into the rock arena.
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38 of 42 people found the following review helpful By Greywolf TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 26 Feb 2010
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
1967. The Beatles were working on Sergeant Pepper, the Rolling Stones were getting busted and going psychedelic, Pink Floyd were wowing them down at the UFO, Timothy Leary was advising the world's youth to "turn on, tune in, drop out," art was exploding with extravagant flashes of colour, light shows were swirling, flowers were for wearing, life was for living and to be young was a treasure and an opportunity. Magic was in the air. And in a studio in London, the five members of the Moody Blues gathered to fashion a portion of that magic into an album the like of which the world had never heard. The result was this still remarkable collaboration of rock band and orchestra, featuring a collection of strong songs and musical themes, outstanding among which is, of course, their hit single, 'Nights In White Satin.' The latter is widely recognised as one of the best singles in the history of recorded music. The whole album is one of the finest artefacts of a revolutionary musical era. In the current age of cynicism it's fashionable to dismiss the Moody Blues as limp, lame, hippy has-beens. Personally, I rate them as among the all-time great British rock bands and find their albums still fresh, enjoyable and relevant after all these years. This album stands up remarkably well, taking us through a day from sunrise to night with every note, phrase and lyric perfectly judged to create what is arguably the first themed rock album. The quality of the musicianship from the band members is amazing. This was a band who could genuinely play real instruments. Their voices combine beautifully too. A true classic, still capable of rekindling the magic of a golden era of optimism and wonder.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Mr. R. Baker on 10 Dec 2003
Format: Audio CD
Days of Future Passed is my favourite album from the 1960s. A mixture of solid, well written 60s psychedelic pop and lush orchestral arrangements give the album an epic, but not over the top feel.
The album is written and constructed as a concept album, marking a day, from sunrise to sunset. Some of the lyrics reflect this in their lyrics (Peak Hour, The Sun Set), whilst some of the references are far more abstract (Dawn is a Feeling, Nights in White Satin).
The songwriting is of a high standard throughout - there are no songs on the album I don't love - and the overall sound is excellent, with beautiful harmonies and excellent instrumentation.
Standout songs include 'Peak Hour', in a 60s R&B style, the fast paced 'Twlight Time' and, of course, 'Nights in White Satin'.
The album's downpoint, as many will tell you, is the poetry in 'The Day Begins' and in the orchestral outro, which is just irritating more than anything. Otherwise, I think this album is perfect, and could not recommend it enough.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By HAYLING BOOK & MUSIC VENUE (HBMV) TOP 500 REVIEWER on 15 July 2011
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I am at a loss to understand why one reviewer gave this a one star rating, but we all have an opinion...and here is mine for what it is worth!

I heard this album in its entirety for the first time recently. It was intriguing, because I had heard the individual single releases and some album tracks on compilations and live albums. It was a joy to now hear them in their proper surroundings, cradled in an orchestral setting as part of a larger piece of work.

The album as a whole is of the highest quality for its time (1967) and the orchestrations and compositions (even the 'links') are inspiring and highly enjoyable.

It is fair to say that the CD release could have done without all the bonus paraphenalia which whilst welcome from a value perspective, is difficult to listen to as a 'tack-on' to such a complete, wonderful and well rounded production.

Outstanding.
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