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Days Captive Paperback – 8 Aug 2004


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Paperback, 8 Aug 2004
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Product details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: New Generation Publishing (8 Aug. 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0755201396
  • ISBN-13: 978-0755201396
  • Product Dimensions: 14 x 1.1 x 21.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 7,182,759 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 4 Sept. 2004
At a time when many news mediums seem to do little more than recycle government spin proclamations, Days Captive, in its own unique way, makes a strong case for a return to timely investigative journalism (i.e.: Telling vs. Showing). The story, a truly gripping one dealing with terrorism, is presented mainly through flashback (a journalist relays the saga of a friend, now dead, who was once deemed a hero by thwarting a major terrorist attack). The book's substance lies in its portrayal of the power of apathy -- as well as its depiction of humanity's seemingly innate distaste for problem prevention. But it really packs a punch when it shows, through vivid characterization, how the basic human traits that lie within us all can aid or bring about terrible acts of brutality.
All in all, a great novel for a disturbed and disturbing decade.
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By Pat on 25 Sept. 2004
It's been said that quality novels fit into three categories: 1) good novels, 2) very good novels, and 3) great novels. A good novel is defined as one that teaches you something. A very good novel both teaches you something and is highly entertaining at the same time. But a great novel does all these things while changing the way you think. In this regard, Days Captive is a great novel.
Written by an American who has spent more than fifteen years in foreign countries, Days Captive is told through the first person narration of a British jourmalist. In doing so it gives an eye-opening view of how others see America and Americans without resorting to tabloid or trailer park extremes. '...It's a dilemma the rest of us face every time we meet people from the United States,' says the lead character, 'the world is ultimately a better place because of them, but as a country, America will do what it wants to do, regardless.' Thoughtful prose like this is the hallmark of this book, but its real strength lies in the way it shows how the human traits that lie within us all contribute to the concept of terrorism --- without diminishing or ignoring its evil or blaming the West for everything. That's a difficult line to tread yet the author does so beautifully, mixing realism, absurdity and page-turning action into a breathtakingly heady concoction. Equally, through a series of 'articles' and 'op-ed' pieces interspaced at select places in the story, the history of terrorism, its psychology, a look at the world's most notorious terrorist groups and other vital bits of information are artfully presented in a thought-provoking manner.
In summation, this book is for anyone who is NOT interested in sticking his or her head in the sand when it comes to the subject of terror.
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By A Customer on 31 Aug. 2004
Ironically, although the text of this book can be slightly graphic in places, its power lies in its subtlety. For example, all the traits seen in the story's protagonist, when amplified, are those seen in terrorists - which is both eye-opening and disturbing. Yet incredibly, the book never sinks into negativity or cynicism. That in itself is quite an accomplishment and praise is due to the author for successfully pulling it off. Nor does the story fall into the trap of singling out certain terrorist groups. A terrorist is a terrorist is a terrorist suggests Mr. Scott, and rightly so.
Quite simply, this book could not have come at a better time. The only question is, will anyone listen? Or will we (including terrorists) remain 'captive' to inane political beliefs, perverted religious practices, self-defeating wekanesses and/or doomed nationalistic policies?
There is certainly lot here to talk about.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 3 reviews
More Light than Heat 25 Sept. 2004
By Pat - Published on Amazon.com
It's been said that quality novels fit into three categories: 1) good novels, 2) very good novels and 3) great novels. A good novel teaches you something. A very good novel both teaches you something and is highly entertaining at the same time. But a great novel does all these things while changing the way you think. In this regard, Days Captive is a great novel.

Written by an American who has spent more than 15 years in foreign countries, Days Captive is told through the first person narration of a British journalist. In doing so, it gives an eye-opening view of how others see America and Americans without resorting to tabloid or trailer park extremes. '...It's a dilemma the rest of us face every time we meet people from the United States,' the main character laments, 'the world is ultimately a better place because of them, but as a country, America does what it wants to do, regardless.' Thoughful prose like this is the hallmark of this book, but its strength lies in the way it shows how the human traits that lie within us all contribute to the very concept of terrorism --- without diminishing or ignoring its evil or blaming the West for everything. In the end we're all to blame, suggests the narrator - and by the end of the book you'll believe it. That's a difficult line to tread yet the author does so beautifully, mixing realism, absurdity and page-turning action into a breathtakingly heady concoction. Equally, through a series of 'articles' and 'op-ed' pieces interspersed at select places in the story, the history of terrorism, its psychology, a look at the world's most notorious terrorist groups and other vital bits of information are artfully presented in a thought-provoking manner.

In summation, this book is for anyone who is NOT interested in sticking his or her head in the sand when it comes to terrorism. You may not agree with everything it says, but its point is that the only way we're ever going to eliminate this killer disease is by getting invloved, identifying its causes and working toward eliminating them rather than spending obscene amounts of money and too many lives treating it symptoms. It's difficult to argue with a moral like that.
Food for Thought 4 Sept. 2004
By Mike - Published on Amazon.com
This is a deeply thought-provoking novel. Ironically, although the text of Days Captive can be quite graphic in places, its power lies in its subtlety. For example, all the traits seen in the story's protagonist, when amplified, are similiar to those seen in terrorists, which is both eye-opening and disturbing. Yet incredibly, the book never sinks into negativity - nor is it too cynical. That in itself is quite an accomplishment and praise is due to the author for successfully pulling it off. In addition, the story does not single out certain terrorist groups and lavish them with attention. A terrorist is a terrorist is a terrorist suggests Mr. Scott, and rightly so. Instead, he focuses on the psychology behind terrorism, which is a unique twist.

Quite simply, this book could not have come at a better time. The only question is - will anyone listen? Or will we remain 'captive' to our inane political beliefs, perverted religious practices and/or doomed nationalistic policies.
Wow! What a find! 31 Aug. 2004
By Beata - Published on Amazon.com
At a time when many news mediums seem to do little more than recycle government spin proclomations, Days Captive, in its own unique way, makes a strong case for a return to timely and thoughtful investigative journalism. The story, a truly gripping one dealing with terrorism, is told mainly through flashbacks (a jounalist relays his views of a friend, now dead, who was once deemed a hero by thwarting a major terrorist attack). The book's substance lies in its protrayal of the (negative) power of apathy as well as its depiction of humanity's seemingly innate distaste for problem prevention.

But it really packs a punch when it shows, through vivid characterization, how basic human traits can aid or bring about terrible acts of brutality.

All in all, a great novel for a disturbed and disturbing decade.
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