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Database Programming with JDBC and Java Paperback – 11 Jun 1997


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Paperback, 11 Jun 1997
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Product details

  • Paperback: 237 pages
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media; 1 edition (11 Jun 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1565922700
  • ISBN-13: 978-1565922709
  • Product Dimensions: 19 x 1.7 x 24.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,813,429 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Product Description

Amazon Review

The Java Database Connectivity classes (JDBC) sensibly provide an interface between a platform-independent programming language (Java) and a standardised database language (Structured Query Language, or SQL). Pretty much every Java program that is involved in transactions or other business operations connects to a database through JDBC, so familiarity with the JDBC classes can magnify your other Java skills.

Database Programming with JDBC and Java explains how JDBC fits into unitised software applications in which various functional parts communicate over a network. author George Reese also shows how to write programs that take advantage of the JDBC classes, emphasising the most commonly used ones (such as those that perform INSERT and SELECT operations) but also giving the more obscure classes their due.

This book is essentially an ongoing lecture of increasing complexity. To cite one thread, it begins with clear but academic examples that involve discrete transactions (opening a connection, performing a query and closing the connection). It then moves on to connection pooling and other JDBC-supported optimisations for the real world. A menagerie of specialised sections on such topics as security and persistence rely heavily on long code examples. A section on Swing programming seems kind of out of place, but is short.

In sum, this slim volume is a great introduction to JDBC for those looking to approach Java-distributed applications by way of database work. --David Wall --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

From the Publisher

This book describes the standard Java interfaces that make portable object-oriented access to relational databases possible, and offers a robust model for writing applications that are easy to maintain. The second edition has been completely updated for JDBC 2.0, and includes reference listings for JDBC and the most important RMI classes. The book begins with a quick overview of SQL for developers who may be asked to handle a database for the first time, and goes on to explain how to issue database queries and updates through SQL and JDBC. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

3.1 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 27 July 2004
Format: Paperback
This is poor. I expect more from O'Reilly books. The ugly bias towards avoiding stored procedures sums up the book. Many developers writing DB apps want to get the maximum performance out of their database. They really don't care whether the code ports well to other vendors, because that is outside their remit. Worse still, the chapter on Meta data is very lightweight. The author glosses over implementation details. The fact that every JDBC driver I have seen calls SQL under the bonnet, then wraps that in a Java API should be explained. Often you can do better by writing your own MetaData classes.... Some JDBC drivers simply return the ** WRONG ** Meta Data. That should be pointed out. A serious DB developer needs to know what is going on under the bonnet and this book does not help.
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Format: Paperback
I found this book a pleasant surprise. It covers some very interesting and non-trivial concepts (persistent objects, JDBC, RMI) without wasting much text. The author does not assume the reader is a dummy (as too many Java books do), and his persistence framework is a nice bonus for coders looking to leverage their readings.
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By A Customer on 5 Nov 1998
Format: Paperback
The best Java book covers 3-tier application. I found this book covers RMI is even better than other "JAVA RMI" book. The code is well organized and use good design patterns.
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Format: Paperback
I found this book hard to follow and the sample code was to big to learn from. If you are looking to learn JDBC programming you will learn a small amount from this one !
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By ade@omoboya.com on 7 July 2000
Format: Paperback
I enjoyed this book, It comes from a pattern / framework point of view. It shows what you can build with JDBC and not necessarily what the API's are. The Persistent Library is good. I have developed a couple of systems to use my modified version of this library. The Book's Title should be more of 3Tier Client Server Development with RMI and JDBC
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