Database Modeling and Design: The Fundamental Principles and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more

Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Start reading Database Modeling and Design on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Database Modelling and Design: Entity Relationship Approach [Paperback]

Toby J. Teorey
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)

Available from these sellers.


Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition 33.24  
Paperback 34.99  
Paperback, April 1990 --  

Book Description

April 1990 1558601341 978-1558601345
This new edition of "Database Modeling & Design" continues to focus on the techniques for relational database design introduced in previous editions, starting with the entity-relationship (ER) approach for data requirements specification and conceptual modeling. Author Toby Teorey then looks ahead to the common properties in data modeling and operations shared among the relational model and advanced database technologies such as the object-oriented, temporal, and multimedia models. A full chapter is devoted to database design techniques for data warehousing and online analytical processing (OLAP). Teorey covers the database life cycle from requirements analysis and logical design to physical design for local, distributed, and multidatabases. The discussion of basic principles is supplemented with a common, running example: a company personnel and project database based on real-life experiences and classroom testing. Written for both the novice and the professional database designer, this book is the essential resource for database modeling, including the building of standard SQL data definitions. The design rules set forth in this book are applicable to any SQL-based system, including IBM DB2, Oracle V8.0, Informix IDS-UDO, Microsoft Access, Microsoft SQL Server, and Sybase Adaptive Server Enterprise. This title provides continued focus on relational model. It features integration of information about data warehouse and OLAP, plus other advanced database technologies, including object oriented, multimedia, and temporal database. It includes a discussion of basic principles is supplemented by examples based on real life cases.
--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed


Product details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Morgan Kaufmann Publishers In (April 1990)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1558601341
  • ISBN-13: 978-1558601345
  • Product Dimensions: 23.1 x 15 x 2.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,796,380 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

From the Author

This book is for database developers and administrators.
As the author of "Database Modeling and Design" I am pleased to make some comments on the practical use of the book. Relational databases have made a big impact on information technology, and it looks like they will be doing so for at least another decade as the dominant technology, especially for corporate and personal databases. This is a book for the database developer or database administrator with at least some background in programming and the basics of relational databases. In fact, 80% of its sales has been to professionals and managers of IT. It has also been successfully used to supplement textbooks for courses in relational databases.

The reader should be aware that this book is not an introductory text for relational databases and is not for the novice as a first exposure to databases. However, if you want to be able to take a database concept from inception to implementation, this is the right book. It's fun to use and it gets you to your goal with minimum hassles. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

About the Author

Toby J. Teorey is a professor in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Arizona, Tucson, and a Ph.D. in computer sciences from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He was general chair of the 1981 ACM SIGMOD Conference and program chair for the 1991 Entity-Relationship Conference. Professor Teorey's current research focuses on database design and data warehousing, OLAP, advanced database systems, and performance of computer networks. He is a member of the ACM and the IEEE Computer Society. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
First Sentence
"orders being formulated in the mind of the end user during the interview process. II. Logical design. The global schema, which shows all the data and their relationships, is developed using conceptual data modeling techniques such as ER." Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
5.0 out of 5 stars
5.0 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Perfect Balance of Theory and Practice! 4 April 1999
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
This is one of the best books I have found for the intermediate-advanced DB designers out there. Most of the other books dwell too much on theory - one of my main gauges for checking out DB Modeling books has been a scan for descriptions on what First and more advanced Normal Forms mean and this book does a great job. It goes step-by-step with plenty of worthwhile examples on why you should attempt to normalize to higher degrees and even on why, as a final step, you may actually want to denormalize (yes, undo some of the work that you've done). This is not a beginner's book - go get SQL for Dummies or the like if you're just getting started. If, on the other hand, you've been creating tables, databases, and indexes for a while and can't quite figure out how to get around a pesky design problem, then this is the perfect book for you.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.6 out of 5 stars  9 reviews
30 of 31 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Theoretical Analysis 15 Mar 2000
By Bucci - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I have no formal schooling in programming, but find myself having developed one major database application and about to embark on another larger project. I bought the book because I wasn't sure if my intuitions about database design were the right intuitions.
Given what I was looking for, the book was excellent. It described (perhaps in dry language) the theoretical underpinnings of a well designed (or normalized) database.
Also, the book gave me the proper smybolic and linguistic tools to tackle the task of DB design in a more organized and effecient process.
In short, it turns out there are very strict rules about what makes a database a well designed database. Given that previously I was designing on intuition alone, I found this book an excellent developmental tool. There were a few things I was doing wrong that I won't do again!
By the way, there are 2 chapters in the book that most people won't use. Or rather, if you need these chapters you probably don't need the other chapters. These are the chapters on geographically distributed database applications and the chapter on how the physical implementation of the database in memory can relate to query optimization.
17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Perfect Balance of Theory and Practice! 4 April 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This is one of the best books I have found for the intermediate-advanced DB designers out there. Most of the other books dwell too much on theory - one of my main gauges for checking out DB Modeling books has been a scan for descriptions on what First and more advanced Normal Forms mean and this book does a great job. It goes step-by-step with plenty of worthwhile examples on why you should attempt to normalize to higher degrees and even on why, as a final step, you may actually want to denormalize (yes, undo some of the work that you've done). This is not a beginner's book - go get SQL for Dummies or the like if you're just getting started. If, on the other hand, you've been creating tables, databases, and indexes for a while and can't quite figure out how to get around a pesky design problem, then this is the perfect book for you.
15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A bit dry, but impressively thorough! 17 Feb 2000
By Wilfredo R. Infante - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Ok, yes the book is rather dry. No cute anecdotes here. But, if you bring yourself to really focus on it you'll find DM&D to be a well written book. At a little over 300 pages it did a great job of conveying the major DM concepts concisely yet with enough examples so that the reader can achieve a good level understanding. Also, not having to wade through another 1500 page goliath yet getting the same return, in terms of knowledge acquired, saves me time, my most valuable resource right now. Undisciplined novices may not find it a good 'motivator' book because it does serve up a great deal of information per page mixing both basic information and advanced concepts, this generally leads to rereading a page several times to let a theory and it's implications sink in. All in all I really thought it was a very worthwhile read. It filled a good number of 'holes' in my knowledge of data modeling. I've been doing Oracle database administration for 5 years and hardcore modeling in the last 2. I was pretty good at my job, now I'm even better! Hope this helps!
13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not for DB novices (3rd Edition) 26 Sep 2003
By adnan - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
PREAMBLE: I have experience with creating small DBs in Access and basic SQL and have been a business user of DBs for many years. I am knew to the DB modeling and design world and was looking for an introductory text on conceptual & logical DB modeling. I consider myself a novice.
The GOOD: Chapters 1-5 are done well. The book does a good job of introducing the reader to the Entity-Relationship(ER) model approach using the Chen notation and its extensions. It also does a good job explaining how ER modeling can be applied to a database life cycle, in particular, requirements analysis, conceptual and logical modeling. Also, the transformation of the ER model elements to SQL constructs and the process of DB normalization are explained well. The "real-life" case study helps with the explanations. The book provides an extensive list of literary references.
The BAD: From Chapter 6 and on. It started reading like an academic literature review of all advanced database related topics like Data warehousing (DW), Object-Relation DB(ORDB), and Object-Oriented DB (OODB), OLAP. The topics were covered in a cursory manner and then the reader is directed to the referred reading list for more information. Also, the book becomes much more academic on how the DBMS deals with the physical elements like access methods, indexes, data allocation, execution times, etc. These topics are way to technical for the novice DB user. The book does not really provide any real in-depth informaton on DB modeling and design for the other DB structures/tools discussed (DW,ORDB,OODB,OLAP).
CONCLUSION: The primary reason for the "2 stars" is the misleading commentary that this book would be useful to the novice designer. This book is not for a DB novice, but for intermediate-advanced DBA/Architect/Modeler. Overall, I found the book tries to cover too many topics and in the process diluting all the topics. Leaving the reader with the feeling of not really learning that much. If you are an intermediate-advanced DB user then I can see the book being useful in providing a roadmap to the DB literature while providing a basic introduction. Books of this nature should not try to tap both sides of the experience spectrum; pick one and then stick to that level.
15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars This book is not for the novice.... 22 Jan 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
If you're still trying to understand just how relational databases work, don't start with this book. In fact, read several more beginner-level books before trying to deal with this one. I'm half way through and can't say I comprehend any of what I've read. I did read wonderful reviews before I purchased "Database Modeling and Design," so there are many advanced readers who will surely benefit from the dry and technical style of writing and presentation in Teory's book. This is a perfect case of using so many source references that the author forgot to write for the reader, instead of for fellow academics. The marketplace now has a new type of database designer and analyst - those with liberal arts degrees, not engineering!
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback