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Data Modeling Made Simple with PowerDesigner (Take It With You) [Paperback]

Steve Hoberman , George McGeachie
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
RRP: 79.99
Price: 60.29 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
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Book Description

20 Nov 2011 0977140091 978-0977140091
Data Modeling Made Simple with PowerDesigner will provide the business or IT professional with a practical working knowledge of data modeling concepts and best practices, and how to apply these principles with PowerDesigner. You'll build many PowerDesigner data models along the way, increasing your skills first with the fundamentals and later with more advanced feature of PowerDesigner. This book combines real-world experience and best practices to help you master the following ten objectives:
  1. You will know when a data model is needed and which PowerDesigner models are the most appropriate for each situation
  2. You will be able to read a data model of any size and complexity with the same confidence as reading a book
  3. You will know when to apply and how to make use of all the key features of PowerDesigner
  4. You will be able to build, step-by-step in PowerDesigner, a pyramid of linked data models, including a conceptual data model, a fully normalized relational data model, a physical data model, and an easily navigable dimensional model
  5. You will be able to apply techniques such as indexing, transforms, and forward engineering to turn a logical data model into an efficient physical design
  6. You will improve data governance and modeling consistency within your organization by leveraging features such as PowerDesigner's reference models, Glossary, domains, and model comparison and model mapping techniques
  7. You will know how to utilize dependencies and traceability links to assess the impact of change
  8. You will know how to integrate your PowerDesigner models with externally-managed files, including the import and export of data using Excel and Requirements documents
  9. You will know where you can take advantage of the entire PowerDesigner model set, to increase the success rate of corporate-wide initiatives such as business intelligence and enterprise resource planning (ERP)
  10. You will understand the key differentiators between PowerDesigner and other data modeling tools you may have used before
This book contains seven sections:

Section I introduces data modeling, along with its purpose and variations.

Section II explains all of the components on a data model including entities, data elements, relationships, and keys. Also included is a discussion of the importance of quality names and definitions for your objects.

Section III explains the important role of data modeling tools, the key features required of any data modeling tool, and an introduction to the essential features of PowerDesigner. It also describes how to create and manage data modeling objects in PowerDesigner.

Section IV introduces the Data Model Pyramid, then dives into the relational and dimensional subject areas, logical, and physical data models, and describes how PowerDesigner supports these models and the connections between them.

Section V guides you through the creation of your own Data Model Pyramid.

Section VI focuses on additional PowerDesigner features (some of which have already been introduced) that make life easier for data modelers. Learn how to get information into and out of PowerDesigner, and improve the quality of your data models with a cross-reference of key PowerDesigner features with the Data Model Scorecard.

Section VII discusses PowerDesigner topics beyond data modeling, including the XML physical model and the other types of model available in PowerDesigner.



Product details

  • Paperback: 532 pages
  • Publisher: Technics Publications (20 Nov 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0977140091
  • ISBN-13: 978-0977140091
  • Product Dimensions: 28 x 22 x 3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 930,485 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Authors

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Product Description

From the Author

The PowerDesigner content is intended to provide the narrative that is lacking in the documentation supplied with PowerDesigner. Though it is set in the context of Steve's excellent work on data modelling, it is accessible to any user of PowerDesigner. Every topic refers you to the relevant part of the PowerDesigner documentation; we didn't set out to replace the PowerDesigner documentation, that would require a much larger book!

About the Author

About Steve
Steve Hoberman is the most requested data modeling instructor in the world. Steve balances the formality and precision of data modeling with the realities of building software systems with severe time, budget, and people constraints. In his consulting and teaching, he focuses on templates, tools, and guidelines to reap the benefits of data modeling with minimal investment. He taught his first data modeling class in 1992 and has educated more than 10,000 people about data modeling and business intelligence techniques since then. Steve is the author of five books on data modeling, the founder of the Design Challenges group, and inventor of the Data Model Scorecard®.

About George
George McGeachie has worked in the field of data modeling and metadata in a variety of industries for many years. George has evaluated, implemented, tailored and used various data modeling and metadata management tools during data modeling assignments around the globe. He is always regarded as a power user for whichever tool is in use, finding new ways of exploiting their capabilities.


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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars PowerDesigner made Simple 17 Sep 2012
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
I started using PowerDesigner without any formal training, just many years of using all sorts other modeling tools. Although the basics were pretty easy to learn I was not really able to use many of the powerful features. I then bought this book and that helped me to really get going. This is the type of user manual that you would like to get with a modeling tool. It also provides you with the basics of Data Modeling, even if you think you are an expert modeler it helps to have the book explain how the basics fit together. I would have liked more on how to organize all your models in PowerDesigner but perhaps that is another book. If you are looking for a book to help you get going in PowerDesigner this is the book I would recommend. Well worth the money.
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Format:Paperback
Having used Power Designer for over 10 years in many environments I was a little dubious about this book.

1. Would it cater for the zealous user?
2. I felt dread at how tediously boring a book on Power Designer data modeling could be :)

Boy, was I wrong! "Data Modeling Made Simple with PowerDesigner" is a book that should be in the library of all Power Designer Data Modelers. It will certainly have a place on my desk! The authors, Steve Hoberman and George McGeachie
have left no stone unturned and this is coupled with humourous anecdotes throughout the book which liven up what could be a very drab read. Who would have thought that modeling icecream could be so much fun!

The book is divided up into a number of sections, the first of which introduces the concept of a data model and its role in the organisation. The focus is on communication between functional groups and the presentation of a data model which
provides semantic interoperability and mutual understanding of common perspectives at different levels of detail.

The second section of the book looks at the various components of a data model, explaining the terms entity, attributes/data elements, domains, conceptual -> logical -> physical models, business rules and relationships. If I had one quibble, the authors might have stuck with the Power Designer terminology for these sections, as the book is inherently "Data Modeling with PowerDesigner". For example, the word "attribute" should have been used instead of "data element" as that is the term used in the Sybase application. Even in the Power Designer specific portion of the book, "Data Elements" is used in the text, however, accompanying screenshots use "Entity Attribute".
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.8 out of 5 stars  4 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A great book for those new to PowerDesigner or people moving beyond just physical models 12 Sep 2012
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I've been waiting for a good, third-party book on PowerDesigner for a while now. If you're new to PowerDesigner and data modeling this is an excellent book. If you're an experienced data modeler or familiar with PowerDesigner, it's probably still worth a read but you may not get quite as much out of it as you'd like. I like the original "Data Modeling Made Simple" and if you're looking at buying that book, getting a version that helps you immediately apply the concepts in a robust tool is a no brainer. I would've preferred the option of buying the PowerDesigner portion in a smaller form-factor for easy reference but then again, I have at least two copies of Data Modeling Made Simple on my bookshelf already. Having said that, here are the pieces I found best.

I'm going to skip the section on data modeling and get right into the PowerDesigner specifics. If you're new to PowerDesigner, chapter 10 is a great - particularly the discussion of object lists, which is one of the most useful features of the tool.

The material on working with Conceptual, Logical and Physical models (chapters 11-17), is well put together with some good exercises to practice. I don't agree with everything in the book but it covers all of the major topics. I particularly liked the discussions on the reuse of data items within a conceptual model and the use of domains across all models. If you've been using PowerDesigner for a while, but dealt strictly with physical data models, these chapters would serve as a good introduction to the additional features of the conceptual and logical models that you should be leveraging.

Chapters 20-23 cover some of the more advanced tools within PowerDesigner and here's where I would've liked more. The glossary, test data generation, and export import are excellent tools and the ability to extend PowerDesigner or manipulate models via script is incredibly useful. If you're new to the tool or haven't used these functions, you should review of these chapters in particular. You might not leverage these tools immediately, but they can save you a lot of time when you do.

In short, a good book for people new to both data modeling and PowerDesigner or experienced users who have dealt only with the physical data models who are looking to expand. It delivers exactly what the title suggests, just not exactly what I was hoping for.
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A very useful reference for all Data Modelers using Powerdesigner 9 July 2012
By Maeve Branigan - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Having used Power Designer for over 10 years in many environments I was a little dubious about this book.

1. Would it cater for the zealous user?
2. I felt dread at how tediously boring a book on Power Designer data modeling could be :)

Boy, was I wrong! "Data Modeling Made Simple with PowerDesigner" is a book that should be in the library of all Power Designer Data Modelers. It will certainly have a place on my desk! The authors, Steve Hoberman and George McGeachie
have left no stone unturned and this is coupled with humourous anecdotes throughout the book which liven up what could be a very drab read. Who would have thought that modeling icecream could be so much fun!

The book is divided up into a number of sections, the first of which introduces the concept of a data model and its role in the organisation. The focus is on communication between functional groups and the presentation of a data model which
provides semantic interoperability and mutual understanding of common perspectives at different levels of detail.

The second section of the book looks at the various components of a data model, explaining the terms entity, attributes/data elements, domains, conceptual -> logical -> physical models, business rules and relationships. If I had one quibble, the authors might have stuck with the Power Designer terminology for these sections, as the book is inherently "Data Modeling with PowerDesigner". For example, the word "attribute" should have been used instead of "data element" as that is the term used in the Sybase application. Even in the Power Designer specific portion of the book, "Data Elements" is used in the text, however, accompanying screenshots use "Entity Attribute". Chapter 5 talks about "Data Elements", Chapter 6 "Data Attributes" and Chapter 7 is back to "Data Elements". A further example, with the use of the term "subtypes" when Sybase use "Inheritence Links". In my opinion it would be more appropriate to use consistent terminology throughout the book from the outset.

Chapter 6 offers a comprehensive discussion on how critical it is to provide meaningful names and definitions in your data model and naming conventions.

Section 3 delves into the nitty gritty on Power Designer. Chapter 8 answers that question that data modelers often hear - "But why do we need to spend money on a data modeling tool, can't you just use xyz". The chapter categorises the features provided by Power Designer into Core Modeling, Usability, Interfaces and Integration, Top Management and Communication and Collaboration. This chapter is very well laid out.

Chapter 9 looks at "meta data scope" in Power Designer and denotes that Power Designer provides a single modeling environment in the organisation. It is widely agreed that the alignment of process, technology and data is key to any organisation and PowerDesigner makes this so simple by provision of multiple model types and ability to map between them. A high level description of the main features of PowerDesigner is given.

Chapter 10 and 11 and 12 are very helpful for anyone starting out with Power Designer. It goes painstakingly through the Power Designer interface and describes how it can be adapted to suit the user's needs. The interface can be daunting for a newbie and it is noted that a number of Power Designer complexities are clearly outlined upfront, for example, docking selectors and grouping views together. It is very apparent that Steve Hoberman and George McGeachie are well versed in PowerDesigner best practices as they explain what REALLY matters upfront and do not overcomplicate things. There is discussion on "rerouting symbols manually" which I often battle with when designing a large functional area in a data model. The book is also up-to-date as it covers the new glossary auto-complete functionality which was delivered in version 16 of PowerDesigner. Another example is the discussion of the resolution of many to many relationships and the impact that "Allow n-n relationships" has on it. The author also presents gotchas which can cause big headaches such as "Delete Symmbols Only" when removing objects from diagram and saving strategies which I found very comprehensive.

Chapter 15, 16, 17 are well thought out. I have worked in several companies where they do not seem to understand the difference between a conceptual, logical and physical data model. In these organisations the conceptual model usually matches the physical model entity for entity and attribute for attribute. The only difference being the lack of foreign keys and obviously the database specific physical options. These conceptual models usually cost companies a lot of money, however, they are normally ditched before the end of a project as teams realise that the effort is not worth while. The three chapters describing exactly what the purpose of each model and the generation links between then are fabulously written. I learnt a lot in these chapters.

This book is of interest to newbies and seasoned Data Modelers.
5.0 out of 5 stars Very well written. 21 Aug 2014
By Saad - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Very well written. I am an experienced Data Architect but had not used Power Designer before (although experienced with Erwin and ER/Studio). There are some parts which are more elementary (which I skipped) but it helped me get up to speed with PD 16.5 quickly, I would recommend this bot for the novice and experienced who wants to come up to speed on PD quickly.
3 of 10 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Poorly conceived 21 Sep 2012
By SorenTwo - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
I own PowerDesigner but have yet to figure out how to use it. I purchased it for about $65 on an academic basis and took a data modeling course only to discover the hard way that BEFORE you get to data modeling, if you want to do data modeling with a serious database product like SQL Server, you've got to know both SQL Server and database design in SQL Server. I was a PC database programmer for about 7 years, played around with Access 2010 and thought, "What could be the difference?" Well, was I wrong.

That being said, the premise of this book is that you will start with conceptual data modeling (CDM), proceed to logical data modeling (LDM)and finish with physical data modeling (PDM). Guess what: If you don't know what I'm talking about, this book will do you no good.

Moreover, I don't believe that the CDM -> LDM -> PDM route is the way to go. That's because there are many Access developers out there who can get their hands on SQL Server. They should begin with the PDM because that's what they relate to and proceed to LDM and then the CDM. This is just to learn how to think in terms of PowerDesigner, then begin with the CDM.

PowerDesigner is a very powerful product; it does more than data modeling. But you'll have to learn data modeling first, then use this book, and I still don't believe this book is the right way to go. It teaches you how to (i.e.) delete diagrams, but I don't remember how to, for example, create rules. That's why I gave up.

Yet data modeling is critical to good database design and systems design. If you need a data modeling tool and can get PD, consider it. So far as I can tell, this is the only book on PowerDesigner out there now.
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