Das Lied von der Erde has been added to your Basket
Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.
Quantity:1

Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Basket
£14.17
& FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
Sold by: Fulfillment Express
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Available to Download Now
Buy the MP3 album for £6.59

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • Das Lied von der Erde
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
      

Das Lied von der Erde Hybrid SACD, SACD


Price: £14.17 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.
Does not apply to gift orders. See Terms and Conditions for important information about costs that may apply for the MP3 version in case of returns and cancellations.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Complete your purchase to add the MP3 version to your Amazon music library. Provided by Amazon EU S.à r.l.
23 new from £9.76
£14.17 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Amazon's Marc Albrecht Store

Visit Amazon's Marc Albrecht Store
for all the music, discussions, and more.

Frequently Bought Together

Das Lied von der Erde + Mahler: Das Lied von der Erde
Price For Both: £22.29

Buy the selected items together

Product details

  • Conductor: Marc Albrecht
  • Composer: Mahler
  • Audio CD (13 May 2013)
  • Please Note: Requires SACD-compatible hardware
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Hybrid SACD, SACD
  • Label: PentaTone
  • ASIN: B00BK6HRD6
  • Other Editions: MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 126,513 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Listen to Samples and Buy MP3s

Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Samples
Song Title Time Price
Listen  1. Das Lied von der Erde (Song of the Earth): I. Das Trinklied vom Jammer der Erde (The Drinking Song of Earth's Misery) 8:18Album Only
Listen  2. Das Lied von der Erde (Song of the Earth): II. Der Einsame im Herbst (The Lonely One in Autumn) 9:41Album Only
Listen  3. Das Lied von der Erde (Song of the Earth): III. Von der Jugend (Of Youth) 3:01£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. Das Lied von der Erde (Song of the Earth): IV. Von der Schonheit (Of Beauty) 7:40£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  5. Das Lied von der Erde (Song of the Earth): V. Der Trunkene im Fruhling (The Drunkard in Spring) 4:29£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  6. Das Lied von der Erde (Song of the Earth): VI. Der Abschied (The Farewell)29:50Album Only

Product Description

Product Description

Albrecht/Coote/Fritz/Netherlands PO

Review

. This new Pentatone issue surely is among the top current versions. Marc Albrecht has been music director of the Netherlands Philharmonic since 2011, after the tragic early death of Yakov Kreizberg. This site mentioned Albrecht's remarkable Dukas/Ravel/Koechlin disk (REVIEW), his Schumann/Dvorak/Berg disks (REVIEW) and his superb Elektra with the Netherlands Opera (REVIEW). This new recording shows his Mahler credentials in a major way. He is sensitive to the ever-changing moods of this masterpiece, and the orchestra plays magnificently. And he has superior soloists indeed. Alice Coote is outstanding, her warm controlled sound and wide range are perfect for this music, and the tenor, Burkhard Fritz, copes easily with the demanding tenor part. Fritz is relatively new to the operatic world but has been widely acclaimed for his performances during the last decade at the Vienna State Opera, the Munich Opera, and the Berlin State Opera. Obviously he soon will be a prized heldentenor. Add to this Pentatone's superb engineering, and you have an extraordinary disk. --Robert Benson http://www.classicalcdreview.com/MC426.html

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By D. S. CROWE TOP 500 REVIEWER on 24 July 2013
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
My sole focus of interest in this recording was Alice Coote. I had the privilege of hearing her in this very piece in October 2011 at the RFH with Maazel and the Philharmonia, and partnered by the reliable but unremarkable Stefan Vinke.
As I really don't need to need to add to my collection of now 71 recordings of this work, with which I am obviously obsessed, It was primarily as a souvenir of a great performance that I decided to purchase the disc-not a great reason, I admit-but BOY! Am I glad I did as the whole enterprise is absolutely superb!

The recording is in the most spacious detailed sound I can recall, with incredible transparency, even in the weightiest moments, and I have heard orchestral detail never before revealed on recording-and this is in stereo!
In SACD it is even more astounding-true "state of the art".

The voices are captured in an ideal vocal balance, just as one would hear in the concert hall, occasionally coming near to but just avoiding being swamped by the orchestra-and what an orchestra!
I am totally taken aback by the virtuosity of the playing of the Netherlands Philharmonic-the richness of the brass, the lush sonority of the strings, the crystalline brilliance of the high woodwinds and the impact of the percussion give us one of the most impressive orchestral performances against ALL rivals-Vienna, Berlin, BRSO and Concertgebouw included!
The Netherlanders yield nothing in terms of sheer excellence to their colleagues in the Concertgebouw.

Marc Albrecht is a conductor for whom I have had muted enthusiasm in the past-but here he excels, taking a forthright, thrusting view and shaping individual sections in an original and telling manner.
Read more ›
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Entartete Musik on 23 May 2013
Format: Audio CD
With its long sweeping farewell, Das Lied von der Erde has often been considered an elegiac work. But in Marc Albrecht's engaging new recording with the Netherlands Philharmonic Orchestra, Alice Coote and Burkhard Fritz, something more tenacious is at play. Not all will embrace this more hard-edged approach, though it yields its own esoteric bounties and the playing and singing is superb throughout.

The opening 'Trinklied' is delivered with an aggressive swing. Burkhard Fritz's performance is not of an addled drunk but an angry one, railing against the world and the darkness of both life and death. Clipped orchestral textures and superb brass playing make for an engaging opener.

Alice Coote's plangent 'Der Einsame im Herbst' offers a stark but swooning contrast. Here the yearning and melancholic Mahler comes to the fore, telling the hangover triggered by the excesses of the first song. Albrecht draws a seamless legato from his players, before spinning Mendelssohnian whimsy in the third song. 'Von der Schönheit' begins somewhat unpromisingly, with a tempo bordering on the slovenly. But a thrilling percussive eruption emerges and then, as ever, slowly ebbs away.

After a swaggering return of Fritz's inebriated narrator in the fifth song, Albrecht and Coote unleash an embittered 'Der Abschied'. The C minor funeral march is particularly intense, to which Coote can only respond with a lyrical but painful goodbye. But it is only in the very final section of the poems adapted by Mahler that anger finally abates, the tension fades and things take on a softer hew. Those looking for sepia tones and fond farewells may not respond so well to this approach, but the open-minded will find much to challenge any preconceptions about one of Mahler's most intriguing works.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Andres Santos Jr. on 5 Nov. 2014
Format: Audio CD
great job!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 5 reviews
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
Nothing second rate of this extraordinarily well performed and touching recording-a real gem! 24 July 2013
By D. S. CROWE - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
My sole focus of interest in this recording was Alice Coote. I had the privilege of hearing her in this very piece in October 2011 at the RFH with Maazel and the Philharmonia, and partnered by the reliable but unremarkable Stefan Vinke.
As I really don't need to need to add to my collection of now 71 recordings of this work, with which I am obviously obsessed, It was primarily as a souvenir of a great performance that I decided to purchase the disc-not a great reason, I admit-but BOY! Am I glad I did as the whole enterprise is absolutely superb!

The recording is in the most spacious detailed sound I can recall, with incredible transparency, even in the weightiest moments, and I have heard orchestral detail never before revealed on recording-and this is in stereo!
In SACD it is even more astounding-true "state of the art".

The voices are captured in an ideal vocal balance, just as one would hear in the concert hall, occasionally coming near to but just avoiding being swamped by the orchestra-and what an orchestra!
I am totally taken aback by the virtuosity of the playing of the Netherlands Philharmonic-the richness of the brass, the lush sonority of the strings, the crystalline brilliance of the high woodwinds and the impact of the percussion give us one of the most impressive orchestral performances against ALL rivals-Vienna, Berlin, BRSO and Concertgebouw included!
The Netherlanders yield nothing in terms of sheer excellence to their colleagues in the Concertgebouw.

Marc Albrecht is a conductor for whom I have had muted enthusiasm in the past-but here he excels, taking a forthright, thrusting view and shaping individual sections in an original and telling manner.
I don't agree with reviewer "Entartete Musik" (in the UK) that the opening of Von der Schoenheit is flaccid-I find it touching and delicate, and entirely in keeping, but he is right about the overall tenor of the work being more wistful and a touch sad rather than the devastating outpouring of tragic longing that it can be-and this does indeed work perfectly as a valid and rewarding view of this endlessly fascinating piece.

I had not heard Burkhard Fritz before, though I was aware that he has sung Parsifal in Vienna and Florestan and Cavaradossi in Berlin under Barenboim, and so I was hopeful that he would give a good account-and I am happy to say that it is better than good, it is very fine indeed. He has the standard Germanic slightly nasal tone, and reminds me of Michael Schade, and both Kollo and a steady Peter Hofmann. He surmounts the high peaks with a steady powerful legato, and sings beautifully in the more reflective moments. His is not the biggest voice, and does not banish thoughts of other favourites-Wunderlich (of course), Heppner (for Bertini), Christian Elsner, Araiza (for Giulini live with the VPO), Kmentt (for Kubelik) James King and of course Kollo (with Bernstein)-but I will return to his performance with pleasure.

Finally to Alice Coote. I prefer a lighter voice in this work, rather than the darker contralto tones we often hear, and Alice Coote has just the right instrument, to my ears. She sings with infused vulnerability, her tone seeming likely to crack at times under the restrained emotion-it doesn't of course, this is just great artistry, and she gives a touching and beautifully interpreted reading of each song.
Der Abschied is a triumph for her, Albrecht and the orchestra-It will not leave you devastated and totally drained as can happen in a great performance, because it is not intended to. It is wistful, nostalgic, a touch defiant and finally comfortable with the resignation of the inevitable. I love it- I was moved and uplifted in equal measure.

There are so many great recordings of this work that comparisons are odious and outright recommendations impossible-how many would you like?
What I will say is that this recording holds its own up among the very finest in every respect-and there is certainly no better recorded version.
A fascinating and in many respects revelatory account-if it appeals, buy with confidence!!
5 Glorious Stars, Stewart Crowe.
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
A Fine "Das Lied" 11 Sept. 2013
By T. E. Layman - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I am an addict for Das Lied von der Erde, and so this is joining my many copies, both in CD and in LP. First, I will tell you that my all-time favorite is the recording done by Fritz Wunderlich and Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau with Joseph Keilberth conducting the Bamberg Symphony. There seem to be two recordings, one from 1963 (my favorite) and the other from 1964. The latter is about 3 minutes slower than the first, and most of that timing difference occurs in Der Abschied (2 minutes). The sound is not the greatest, but the emotion put into the recordings is the greatest. The first recording from 1963 is on Cin Cin CCCD 1026 and is long out of print. This was made just after the death of Fischer-Dieskau's wife and may account for the emotional content he gives the recording. Additionally, I was surprised and pleased to find that Joseph Keilberth is a truly fine Mahler interpreter! Now, that said, I find this recording to be quite fine, but just not quite in the same league, although the Super Audio CD sound is obviously better. The PentaTone recording is somewhat bright, and if you have bright sounding speakers you may need some tone control, if possible. Additionally, on some of the louder vocal parts for Burkhard Fritz such as in Das Trinklied the voice is just a little over-saturated, and very, very slightly distorted. Very minor, but there. Burkhard Fritz' tenor voice is quite good, and I have nothing but praise for his singing. I did miss the dramatic emphasis on the phrase "Dunkel ist das Leben, ist der Tod" that Wunderlich gives in the Cin Cin recording...there it is almost frighteningly emphatic. Fritz merely sings the phrase. Ms. Coote has a lighter mezzo voice, but quite nice. I found that in rapid phrases she tends to slide over words as though not comfortable and confident in her German. The conducting of Marc Albrecht is very competent, but he is not the last word in Mahler conducting by a long shot. The Netherlands Philharmonic Orchestra sounds beautiful, and has excellent string sound. I really don't think I've heard a truly incompetent recording of Das Lied, and so my lowest score would be 3 stars in all probability. This is better than average, but simply not great. Sound quality on a system capable of 5.1 definition cannot be bested.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Five stars for Coote, the legitimate heir to Ferrier and Baker in Das Lied 28 Jun. 2013
By Santa Fe Listener - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
The modern history of Das Lied recordings began with a Decca LP featuring Kathleen Ferrier as alato soloist, conducted by Bruno Walter with the Vienna Phil. Ferrier's memory is sainted, not least because of her tragic early death from cancer, and the British tradition continued with Janet Baker, who made Das Lied her own in the Seventies. Can British mezzo Alice Coote, now 45, carry the torch? The dark coloration of her voice places her closer in vocal quality to Ferrier than to Baker. Here she is captured in up to date surround sound that is completely full and natural even when heard in two-channel stereo.

I skipped immediately to the crowning glory of Mahler's score, Abschied, the half-hour song that concludes the work in heartbreak and transcendence. Set against fine playing from the Netherlands Radio Phil., Coote has been captured a little to far away, in a fairly resonant ambience, for optimal impact. But there's no doubt that she is a very musical, sensitive singer, one of the best to be heard in this movement since Baker (I'd add Anne Sophie von Otter and the late Lorraine Hunt Lieberson, neither of whom made commercial recordings, unfortunately, along with the great Christa Ludwig, who made several). Coote's voice is beautiful and she communicates a rapt sense of loneliness and serenity, the very hallmark of the song. Yet I'm not quite sure we're hearing the full stretch of her involvement, because conductor Marc Albrecht's anodyne orchestral work is nothing special - if only Coote had had an Abbado, Jurowski, or Gergiev to work with. Albrecht's rendition of Abschied is basically shapeless; even so, Coote rises to intense emotional heights on her own.

Listening to the song cycle from the beginning, tenor Brukhard Fritz strives manfully with the demanding first song, and given his fairly light voice - no doubt the microphone is a big help - he sounds musical and effective. There's a ringing quality to his upper middle range that's welcome. I'd rank him a few notches below Peter Seiffert, whose voice this one resembles. Albrecht is considerate about not overwhelming his soloist, which always happens in concert with Mahler's large orchestra. The major attraction here is Coote, and she could hardly be bettered in the second song, a long span of wistful melancholy. The fourth song always posses a challenge for the singer to keep up in the fast, low-lying passage about galloping horses. Coote manages very well, and another plus here is PentaTone's transparent sound, revealing every grain of Mahler's magical orchestration.

So it's five stars for the female soloist, which is more than enough incentive to be enthusiastic about the whole recording, since nothing around her is less than good.
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Sorry, but almost no tam-tam in "der Abschied", & too fast through the funeral procession. Almost no mandolin either. 11 Dec. 2013
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
yes, yes, this is, by and large, a well sung "DLvdE". But there's more to this work than just the singing. On the whole, I find Albrecht's conducting lacking in terms of balancing Mahler's textures. Being a major Dutch orchestra, the woodwinds of the Netherlands Phil. are pretty good. But why is the tam-tam (large orchestral gong) almost non-existent in the finale? The two loud strokes near the end of the funeral procession in "der Abschied" are fine, but the twenty-something soft strokes - dispersed between the movement's opening, and throughout the funeral procession - are really almost not there. And while Ms. Coote does an adequate job of restraining her dynamics at the climax near the end of "der Abschied" (there's no indication to sing any louder than piano there), the whole ending comes off colorless - as well as restrained - by the almost complete absence of the mandolin. In addition, as another reviewer has pointed out, the upper strings (violins) sound slightly 'glassy' on this otherwise very fine sounding recording.

Just by way of comparison, even the recent Naxos recording is superior to this one, in the sense that conductor Hans Graf is far better attuned as to what's actually in the orchestration of "Das Lied". He's much more keenly aware of textures and balances throughout the work. I prefer the Naxos issue in spite of the fact that it's not as clearly recorded, and the singing isn't nearly as good. But on the whole, it's a better "DLvdE" - it's not just about the mezzo (or contralto), folks.

Better recommendations when considering all elements (including sound) of "DLvdE" are Janet Baker/Haitink/Philips, J. Baker/Kubelik/Audite; Fassbaender/Arazia/Giulini/BPO/DG (a great budget reissue); Ludgwig/Wunderlich/Klemperer/EMI; Forrester/Lewis/Reiner/CSO/RCA (now an sacd remastering exists); Vermillion/Sinopoli/Dresden Staatskapelle/DG (great sound and great playing). Even among older recording, I enjoy the stereo N.Y. Bruno Walter, as well as the underrated Ormandy/Philly one (again, great playing!). If having a recording in mono is somehow I must, I prefer the 1936 K. Thorborg/Watler/VPO to the more famous Ferrier/Walter ones (never been a big fan).

But if having "DLvdE" in the most hi-def sound is the goal, I would rate the Michelle de Young/Eiji Oue/Minnesota Orch./Reference Recordings one over this Pentatone issue. It's almost as well sung, there's no 'glassiness' to the violins, and the tam-tam and mandolin are captured far better. Also, Oue's conducting of the "Abshied" funeral procession is far superior.
Deeply moving and well recorded 2 Oct. 2013
By Frederick Kirchhoff - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
The performance gets to the heart of the work and the SACD sonics are superb. I'd rate it a top choice.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?



Feedback