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Dark Night Of The Soul [12" VINYL] Single

4.4 out of 5 stars 14 customer reviews

Price: £72.05 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
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£72.05 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details Only 4 left in stock. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.


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Product details

  • Audio CD (12 July 2010)
  • Number of Discs: 4
  • Format: Single
  • Label: Mute
  • ASIN: B003K2SD4U
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 199,879 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Track Listings

Disc: 1

  1. Revenge (Feat. The Flaming Lips)
  2. Just War (Feat. Gruff Rhys)
  3. Jaykub (Feat. Jason Lytle)
  4. Little Girl (Feat. Julian Casablancas)
  5. Angel's Harp (Feat. Black Francis)
  6. Pain (Feat. Iggy Pop)

Disc: 2

  1. Star Eyes (I Can't Catch It) [Feat. David Lynch]
  2. Everytime I'm With You (Feat. Jason Lytle)
  3. Insane Lullaby (Feat. James Mercer)
  4. Daddy's Gone (Feat. Mark Linkous & Nina Persson)
  5. The Man Who Played God (Feat. Suzanne Vega)
  6. Grim Augury (Feat. Vic Chesnutt)
  7. Dark Night Of The Soul (Feat. David Lynch)

Disc: 3

  1. Revenge (Feat. The Flaming Lips)
  2. Just War (Feat. Gruff Rhys)
  3. Jaykub (Feat. Jason Lytle)
  4. Little Girl (Feat. Julian Casablancas)
  5. Angel's Harp (Feat. Black Francis)
  6. Pain (Feat. Iggy Pop)
  7. Star Eyes (I Can't Catch It) [Feat. David Lynch]
  8. Everytime I'm With You (Feat. Jason Lytle)
  9. Insane Lullaby (Feat. James Mercer)
  10. Daddy's Gone (Feat. Mark Linkous & Nina Persson)
  11. The Man Who Played God (Feat. Suzanne Vega)
  12. Grim Augury (Feat. Vic Chesnutt)
  13. Dark Night Of The Soul (Feat. David Lynch)

Disc: 4

  1. Revenge (Feat. The Flaming Lips) [Instrumental]
  2. Just War (Feat. Gruff Rhys) [Instrumental]
  3. Jaykub (Feat. Jason Lytle) [Instrumental]
  4. Little Girl (Feat. Julian Casablancas) [Instrumental]
  5. Angel's Harp (Feat. Black Francis) [Instrumental]
  6. Pain (Feat. Iggy Pop) [Instrumental]
  7. Star Eyes (I Can't Catch It) [Feat. David Lynch] {Instrumental}
  8. Everytime I'm With You (Feat. Jason Lytle) [Instrumental]
  9. Insane Lullaby (Feat. James Mercer) [Instrumental]
  10. Daddy's Gone (Feat. Mark Linkous & Nina Persson) [Instrumental]
  11. The Man Who Played God (Feat. Suzanne Vega) [Instrumental]
  12. Grim Augury (Feat. Vic Chesnutt) [Instrumental]
  13. Dark Night Of The Soul (Feat. David Lynch) [Instrumental]

Product Description

BBC Review

No Danger Mouse project arrives without at least some slight commotion. In the case of Dark Night of the Soul, it involves a familiar-sounding dust up with EMI that recalls the dispute that ultimately led to the producer's Grey Album of 2004 never being officially released. When Sparklehorse lynchpin Mark Linkous committed suicide in March of this year, it only added to the flustering state of this collaborative affair.

Copies of Dark Night... went on sale, online, last year with a limited-edition booklet featuring photographs by David Lynch (also one of the on-record contributors here) and a CD with no music. In the hands of a more pretentious artist it'd have seemed like some sort of postmodern joke. But now, finally, the music is allowed to speak for itself.

With its core creators no strangers to grand designs, Dark Night... plays host to a revolving cast of vocalists. These guests guide the listener through the veins of the album, following what feels like a loose but unshakeable narrative. The fact that it's essentially a lo-fi rock album is the most surprising thing about it.

As you'd expect from artists of this pedigree, its guests are always made to sound like more like co-conspirators. Frank Black–appearing here under his Black Francis alias–and Iggy Pop get to howl and snarl, while former Grandaddy frontman Jason Lytle gets to skilfully slow the momentum with a couple of satisfyingly woozy comedowns. Don't expect many rousing moments; in fact, Suzanne Vega's contribution on Man Who Played God is so crisp and coherent that it sounds weirdly intrusive.

Picked apart and put back together again, Dark Night of the Soul might not take a hammer and some beats to musical boundaries as Danger Mouse has done in the past, but it boasts enough of his curious attitude to making music to keep fans happy. At the same time, it boasts the best in the dusty, scratchy balladry undoubtedly guided by Linkous's much-missed hands. It's a complex, winding late-night soundtrack that doesn't move too fast, but never stops to question the judgement of its own unique outsider logic.

(Dark Night... is dedicated to the memory of both Linkous and Vic Chesnutt–the latter, who committed suicide on Christmas Day 2009, appears on the track Grim Augury.)

--Alistair Lawrence

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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
A long overdue release for this excellent work that blurs the boundaries between art and music. Is it a photography book with music or a lavishly illustrated CD? In reality this is a superb package with a dream line up of cult stars of the indie alternative scene. At times its not quite as strong as one would hope but that would be churlish criticism in light of the ambition of the work. The sad thing though, one which will probably always overshadow the release is that two of the artists really did experience the darkest night of the soul between recording this and its final release. Its hard not to feel a deep deep sadness to see the dedication to the two men who took their own lives within about 4 months of each other. The album now stands as tragic prophecy of the dark night of the soul of two extremely talented men.
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By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 14 July 2010
Format: Audio CD
Let us all pause for a moment, and bow our heads for a brilliant musician. Last March, a deeply depressed Mark Linkous aka Sparklehorse committed suicide.

But before he passed away, Linkous finished one last collaboration with Danger Mouse, appropriately entitled "Dark Night of the Soul." Lots of spacefuzz rock'n'roll and colorful psychedelic pop, with countless guest singers/musicians/composers adding their own unique stylings to the music. And sadly, you can hear some foreshading of Linkous' loss in there.

Every song has guest vocalists who also helped produce and composing their songs. It begins with the warm, liquid psychedelica of "Revenge," in which Wayne Coyne croons sadly, "In my mind/I have shot you and stabbed you through your heart/I just didn't understand/The ricochet is the second part..."

Then it switches to the shimmering, glitchy "Just War" with Gruff Rhys, and the fluttering folk-rock of "Jaykub" with Jason Lytle. After those through songs, there's a brief interlude of pure rock'n'roll -- Julian Casablancas slurs through the lean "Little Girl," Black Francis drawls through the half-baked"Angel's Harp," and Iggy Pop... well, he burns through a fiery expanse of dark hard-rock. What else?

Then things sink back into the spacefuzz again, with James Mercer, Jason Lytle, Vic Chestnutt, David Lynch, Suzanne Vega and Nina Persson all contributing. There's the ethereal electronic "Star Eyes (I Can Catch It)," the twinkly chaotic "Insane Lullaby," the bluesy "Daddy's Gone" and "The Man Who Played God," the melancholy folkpop of "Everytime I'm With You," and with bluesy streamers of synth and mats of grimy guitar in the last two songs.
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Format: Audio CD
(A non-existent) g** only knows we are drowning in the choking, swamp-mud of banal, bland, mediocre love songs, thousands of them all produced using the same plug-ins and over-processed beats. So as if I had taken A BLAST OF PURE OXYGEN I listen to this strange, odd mutation of an album. And can I see why they would use the title of a poem written by someone who was tortured and lived a life of distress and agony? Yes I can.

For some reason I cannot work out each track sounds fresh and different to the production I am used to hearing on TV or radio. Each instrument seems "loved", the snare sound distinctive, the guitars are in the room with me, the bass pops. And oh my, the singers, each drips with an individual character instantly unique and melancholy (except perhaps that stripes singer).

Each song hits the senses, some cruelly, but always beautifully. Thanks Dangermouse and Sparklehorse, this hits me (not my soul as I don't have one) more powerfully than the poem by that poor poet. Sublime.
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Format: Audio CD
As unusual pairings go the link up between the uber hot producer and musician Dangermouse (Brian Joseph Burton) and the sorely departed Mark Linkous from Sparklehorse is particularly intriguing. Add into this mix the presence of Twin Peaks producer and mad genius David Lynch (who signed on to the project create a 100-page book of original photography) and a host of the best and brightest in indie pop and "Dark night of the soul" should be a corker?

Before answering that question lets pause. Clearly the gestation of this album is well known, with Linkous a deeply troubled soul who had at one point medically "died" from an overdose in the early 1990s. He returned to work with Dangermouse a few years back and then rumours of a collaboration between the two men turned into a real project which EMI lawyers in all their wisdom (i.e. none) refused to realise. It's actually been available on the web for some time but now we have a full and proper release.

The music on this album ranges from howling rock to gentle acoustics and it does have some coherence problems when you add in the sheer range or artists. That said "Dangersparkle" a name the two men flirted with, have drawn out some incredible performances none more so than the opener "Revenge" with the Flaming Lips, Wayne Coyne on vocals. This seems to this reviewer to be one of Coyne's best performances since the halcyon days of the Soft Bulletin and Yoshami and is a beautifully tender and slow ballad with brilliant vocals. A great start and the highlights continue. The duet between Linkous and the Cardigan's Nina Persson has a Beatles like quality to it and is deeply prophetic as it fades out with the line "I woke up and all my yesterdays were gone".
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