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Darcy's Story Paperback – 1 Jul 1996


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Product details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Copperfield Books; paperback / softback edition (1 July 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0952821028
  • ISBN-13: 978-0952821021
  • Product Dimensions: 19.6 x 1.7 x 12.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 812,161 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Biography

Janet Aylmer married John and lived in the beautiful city of Bath in the west of England for nearly 30 years. Janet and John have four children and three grandchildren.

Janet was born in Peterborough, England. She was brought up in the county of Surrey before moving to London to go to college.

Interests and Hobbies

Janet enjoys Regency romance and other novels, particularly those by Georgette Heyer and Jane Austen, and likes most books about history and the way the world works. She enjoys visiting the theatre and cinema, and listening to music.

She enjoys travel and meeting new people, and she has visited (in no particular order) ten states in the USA, as well as France, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Raratonga, Japan, Hongkong, Malta, Sweden, Singapore, Norway, the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxembourg, Monaco, Austria, Switzerland, Spain, Italy, Portugal, Madeira, the Canary Islands, Martinique and St Lucia.

Memberships

Janet is a member of the Jane Austen Society, the Society of Authors and the Historical Novels Society

Product Description

Synopsis

A novel which retells the story of "Pride and Prejudice" from Darcy's point of view. Jane Austen had little to say about how Mr Darcy changed from a "haughty, reserved and fastidious" young man to the ardent and humble suitor of Elizabeth Bennett. This is his story.

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Customer Reviews

3.0 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 29 Mar. 2000
Format: Paperback
"What a great idea!" I thought. "Pride and Prejudice from Darcy's point of view!" It is a great idea, but Aylmer wastes the numerous opportunities to tell us more about Darcy as a person, to flesh out the character we meet all too briefly in Austen's novel.
Instead, we are given nearly all the text, verbatim, from the original novel with a few editorial comments on what Darcy was thinking. Nothing significant about his life outside of Pride and Prejudice. Nothing about his past, his childhood, his friends, his experiences that made him the man Elizabeth met at the Assembly Ball. Almost nothing about the torment he must have felt after his first proposal was refused. Nothing about the tremendous changes he went through to make himself into the man Elizabeth could admire. No passion! No creativity!
Here's an example: Can you imagine the conversation Lady Catherine has with Darcy after she visits Elizabeth at Longbourne? The way Aylmer depicts it, Lady Catherine simply shows up and repeats, word-for-word, every piece of dialog between her and Elizabeth. "Then she said..." (Austen's text). "Then I said..." (Austen's text). "Then she said..." (Austen's text again). This is a sad, sad effort and a terrible waste of a great idea!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 24 Jun. 1999
Format: Paperback
After reading a number of books attempting to write a sequal of Pride and Prejudice, I do not have high hopes on reading anymore books relating to Elizabeth and Darcy, believing that their lives together should be left in the imagination of both Jane Austen and her readers. Perhaps this is the reason why I bought Darcy's Story, and I am glad that Janet Aylmer does not let me down. Darcy's Story is not the sequel of Pride and Prejudice; rather, Aylmer attempts to look at the same story in Darcy's point of view. I admire Aylmer's sympathey towards Darcy as a human being only. Aylmer makes me believe why Darcy could not adapt the open manner as Bingley did, why he could not be less conceit when he chose his words for his first proposel of marriage, and, after all, why he should not be viewed, as he is viewed in Pride and Prejudice, as a mysterious but wish-fulfilment figure. I think Aylmer wants us to believe that Darcy is only a man who cares the one whom he loves, and who wants to be loved; I think Aylmer has successfully created Darcy with these humane qualities in her book. Rather, Elizabeth becomes a different creature in Aylmer's book. I cannot think of Elizabeth so "dark" in Darcy's Story, as I would think of her in Pride and Prejudice. She is, I would rather say, quite heavenly in Darcy's story. I do not have any problem with that image of Elizabeth. For Darcy, I think, Elizabeth always seems to be some rare beautiful creature who would inspire him to become a better person. I am gald that Aylmer had done that in her book. The only complain that I have for this novel is what Aylmer has written in Part 2. In this part, the story brings the readers to Netherfield, when Elizabeth had to stay at Netherfield and to take care of her sister, Jane.Read more ›
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Maria Barrett on 1 April 2004
Format: Paperback
I was really looking forward to reading this book, being totally in love with the original and the series. I couldn't wait to receive it when I finally ordered it, and read it in one afternoon. I have to say, I've never read a more disappointing and pointless book. Any new paragraphs or indeed chapters could be fitted whithin two pages, the rest is taken verbatim out of the original book. The ammount of "she then said.." and "to that he said.." followed by text from the original drives you to distraction. Moreover, it doesn't even offer any real insight to Darcy's thoughts and feelings apart for pointless stupid comments like "He found that charming" or " He couldn't agree more" after passages from the original. The account is hurried and in a style that resembles a ten year old's essay. All in all, you'll learn just as much about Darcy's feelings from the original book. The two stars are for filling in a couple of gaps in the story when Darcy is away for periods, but even this chapters are dismal. Won't be reading it twice!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 9 Jan. 2000
Format: Paperback
I have read a lot of the comments on this page, and on other web sites, and I have found that there seems to be mixed results. I agree with those who do not like this book on the point that it seems to be a reproduction of the original P&P. That is, a huge majority (80%) is paraphrased from the original P&P. However, I felt this book helped you better understand Darcy. The readers could see what he was thinking when he first saw Elizabeth, how he felt when Lizzie stayed at Netherfield, or when he saw Wickham and Lizzie talking. The book also goes into what emotions he felt after being rejected by Lizzie and how he tried to cope. Overall, I believe it was a good book. If you are a true fan of Jane Austen, I recommend that you read this book so you could get a better understanding of Darcy's charcater. It can be a quick read if you did what I did . . .I just simply skip the parts of the book that were exactly like P&P, and just read the parts that were different. This way it is a quick read, and you now have a better understanding of Mr. Darcy's character.
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