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  • Darby O'Gill & Little People [DVD] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]
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Darby O'Gill & Little People [DVD] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]

117 customer reviews

Price: £6.58
Only 4 left in stock.
Dispatched from and sold by RAREWAVES USA.
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Region 1 encoding. (requires a North American or multi-region DVD player and NTSC compatible TV. More about DVD formats)
Note: you may purchase only one copy of this product. New Region 1 DVDs are dispatched from the USA or Canada and you may be required to pay import duties and taxes on them (click here for details) Please expect a delivery time of 5-7 days.
£6.58 Only 4 left in stock. Dispatched from and sold by RAREWAVES USA.

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Darby O'Gill & Little People [DVD] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC] + The Quiet Man [DVD] [1952]
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Product details

  • Language: English, French
  • Subtitles: Spanish, French
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 4:3 - 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: G (General Audience) (US MPAA rating. See details.)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (117 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0001I55SI
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 60,863 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By James on 16 Jan. 2013
Format: DVD
I didn't buy this film from Amazon, but I would like to add some extra information for those who have read Liam Byrne's review ("DISNEY DISAPPOINTS WITH THIS DVD"), regarding the dubbed version of the film.

The UK DVD I own seems to contain the original soundtrack intact. (For example, when King Brian orders for the Stradivarius, it is in Gaelic, which I understand was replaced with English in the dubbed release).

Looking at the disc on my PC, the files are dated 08/06/2004 (8th June - Liam's review is dated April 2004), so it looks like Disney made a second run at some point to replace the proper track.

Obviously if buying online it's not a sure thing which version you get, but just some assurance that the original version is out there in R2, in case anyone was put off.
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80 of 86 people found the following review helpful By Liam Byrne on 19 April 2004
Format: DVD
Somebody in the Disney Organisation should be absolutely ashamed of themselves.
DARBY O'GILL and THE LITTLE PEOPLE must rank as one of the very best Disney feature films ever. It was one of the top grossing movies of 1959, with stunning special effects, long before computer technology, that are amazing to watch even today. The Director of LORD OF THE RINGS has publicly stated that he got his inspiration for many of his special effects from this Disney Classic.
It was Sean Connery's first Hollywood movie, and the part that led to his career as 007 in the Bond movies.
Although thought by the public to be generally a "Children's Movie" , it is anything but, and the Banshee sequence is guaranteed to chill the spine of the most hardened Horror fan.
So why is the long overdue DVD disappointing..?.. Because Disney missed a golden opportunity to capitalise on this magnificent feature by failing to include a single Special Feature. No commentary (and Sean Connery or Kieron Moore, both would have been excellent choices), No Stills, No Lobby Cards, No posters, No Cinema Trailer, ...in fact..No Nothing..JUST the basic movie...
Another gripe.....is the tampered with sound track...The original voices of Albert Sharpe (Darby), Estelle Winwood (The Widow Sugrue), Jimmy O'Dea (King Brian of Knocknasheega) and Jack MacGowan (Padraig Og) have all been dubbed with replacement voices..and badly so. Even in the opening scene Estelle Winwoods "old Hag" voice has been replaced by one that sounds like the Queen of England's cousin.....too posh. And in this scene the "dubbed voice" refers to her son Pony Sugrue as TONY Sugrue.
The dubbing takes away much of the charm and originality of the the 1959 cinema released DARBY O'GILL.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Maciej TOP 500 REVIEWER on 25 Jun. 2014
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Both me and my then 10 years old daughter we liked this 1959 Disney classic A LOT! Below, more of my impressions, with some limited SPOILERS.

Darby O'Gill (Albert Sharpe) is an aged widower, living with his adorable daughter Katie (Janet Munro) on a farm near the town of Rathcullen. For a very long time he was the caretaker of Lord Fitzpatrick's (Walter Fitzgerald) estate - but he is now retiring and his replacement is a young guy from Dublin, a certain Michael McBride (Sean Connery).

Darby is also a kind of local celebrity, as since like always during all his pub visits he regals his friends with tales of his battle of wits with the leprechauns and in particular of his long standing rivalry with their king, Brian Connors (Jimmy O'Dea). Almost everybody loves Darby O'Gill but nobody believes his tall tales - which in fact are all very much real... This film tells the story of the ultimate and the most dramatic episode in this "Darby O'Gill vs. Leprechauns" match of century...

This is a lovely, charming, adorable family film exploring in detail and with great care Irish folk legends. The two main actors, Albert Sharpe and Jimmy O'Dea, are absolutely splendid as two old (one is in fact 5000 years old) "frenemies" who enjoy a lot their rivalry, which they interrupt only occasionally to get drunk together...)))

Janet Munro is cute like a button in this film and she gives a great show - it is really heartbreaking that she was taken away by a deadly disease so early (she died in 1972, aged only 38). Young Sean Connery is of course a pleasure to watch in one of his first real roles (his earlier appearances were frequently not even credited) - this film certainly helped him a lot, even if his great break didn't come before 1962...
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By David A. Edwards on 9 Oct. 2011
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This film as, others have said, is enchanting and brilliantly made.

A couple of extra points for discussion:

I read somewhere that Cyril Cusack turned it down because it portrayed the Irish and Ireland in a stereotypical and condescending way. Surely we are mature enough now to accept that this is a mythologized Ireland, with little connection to reality. It is highly puritanical to regard it as an insult to the true history of Ireland with all its political struggles and horrors. It is just a fantasy setting for a delightful story. Just as the Kent of "Darling Buds of May" is a long way from the reality.

The plot of Darby has a delightful conceit: whether or not the Little People really exist (for the purposes of the story) is kept ambiguous throughout. Only Darby ever sees anything, and then usually only when drunk. Only we, the viewers, get to see them too. Are we being shown his visions? Just as we think Darby's visions have been shown to be all in his mind, the film offers an ingenious explanation which allows us (and Darby) to keep believing in what we saw. Is it just a rabbit in the bag? If so, how does the glass pop out? This ambiguity is maintained to the end, when hero Michael McBride, who clearly doesn't really believe in the Little People, defends Darby's right to do so. But Michael McBride is from the modern world, and doesn't need to believe. It's therefore a film full of dramatic irony. We, the real viewers, suspend our disbelief, while the fictional hero doesn't. Very nice that they left that unresolved at the end.
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