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Danse Macabre MP3 CD – Audiobook, Aug 2013


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Product details

  • MP3 CD
  • Publisher: Brilliance Audio; MP3 Una edition (Aug 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1480541842
  • ISBN-13: 978-1480541849
  • Product Dimensions: 13.3 x 1.7 x 17.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 3,480,530 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Stephen King is the author of more than fifty books, all of them worldwide bestsellers. Among his most recent are the Dark Tower novels, Cell, From a Buick 8, Everything's Eventual, Hearts in Atlantis, The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon, and Bag of Bones. His acclaimed nonfiction book, On Writing, was also a bestseller. He is the recipient of the 2003 National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. He lives in Bangor, Maine, with his wife, novelist Tabitha King.

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Review

The indisputable king of horror (TIME)

One of the few horror writers who can truly make the flesh creep (SUNDAY EXPRESS) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Book Description

*Unique combination of fantasy and autobiography by the world's premier writer of horror fiction. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Davey Boy on 31 Aug 2000
Format: Paperback
This book is King's dissection of the horror genre between the years 1950-80. Do not read this book if you expect it to be a horror novel, it is really an in-depth look at horror books, films, and TV. King does use autobiographical elements to make the book interesting, and most of his views and interpretations are interesting as well. However, it does tend to drag in a few places as he covers the same ground too often. If you are a new horror fan, use this book as a stepping stone to great horror novels. If you are a hardcore horror reader, I recommend this book to you as well, because King's opinions are very interesting.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Jane Aland VINE VOICE on 9 Mar 2008
Format: Paperback
In this non-fiction book Stephen King examines the horror genre, primarily between the years 1950-1980, although with a quick look at the roots of the genre with Frankenstein, Dracula and Jekyll and Hyde.

King doesnt' really offer any amazing new insights into the genre, but this is a readable enough work, enlivened by odd moments of autobiographical details. Strangely for a writer King focuses as much on movies as novels, though it's interesting to read his various takes on Kubrick's version of 'The Shining' (King maligns it once, then praises Kubrick on other occasions, before indicating the film as a personal favourite in the index!).

The book as a whole can get rather repetetive, as most of it seems to consist of King running through various book/film plots, but at worst this can be seen as a primer for the horror genre, and I suspect most readers will come out of this on the lookout for a handful of books and films that they had not previously experienced.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By j.r on 11 Aug 2011
Format: Paperback
Danse Macabre is Stephen Kings study on Horror. He doesn't go that in depth but keeps it an easy read about Horror entertainment. He writes to try to explain why the genre is poular and why it appeals to him. He refers to many books, films, T.V. shows and radio plays, many of which I was aware of, some not.
The book is well organised but I found the book for its length to be a little too on the surface of the subject and repetative. The book is still a good study on horror but is now unfortunately quite dated as the book came out in 1981. As a horror fan I found Stephen kings take on the genre interesting and mostly I agreed with him. The trouble with the book is in 1981 alot of horror fans probably would have found the insights in this book quite revelatory but now I think modern horror fans are more self aware of why the genre is what it is and why they like it. Therefore I can't reccomend this book to non-horror fans(that would be pointless) but I can't really reccomend to modern horror fans either, as despite it being well written it's too long and out dated. For instance King talks abot George Romero(refering to Night and Dawn) and Steven Spielberg(refering to Duel), little knowing in 1981 that King himself would go on to work with Romero(Creepshow) and that Romero would direct his book adaption The Dark half. Equally King couldn't have predicted that Spielberg would become known after E.T. to be known as film maker of family block busters and not famous for well made thrillers and horrors in the style of Duel and Jaws.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Steve Fincham on 27 Dec 2003
Format: Paperback
I mistakenly purchased this book believing it to be another piece of horror writing in the same vein as many other great King novels. I was at first disappointed to find it is King's personal comprehensive look at the horror genre (film, radio, novels etc) from post WW2 to 1980. It was written as a response to all those who have ever asked why somone should want to write this type of material - and some equally facinating concepts as to why we buy it!
Despite not being a big movie fan or knowing much else about horror apart from King's work I found the book largely enjoyable. King analyses many examples of classic good and bad horror writing and explains what he believes constitutes a quality horror story and why it actually works for the reader. Occasionally the chapters can drag a little too long; but largely the subject keeps moving to maintain interest.

Even if you are not a big-horror buff the titles quoted and referrred to are described in such a way that even those who have not seen / read the material can enjoy and benefit from King's criticism.
Many readers will be inspired to go and find new horror material which is highly recommended after the analysis in this book. Films and radio are similarly delt with - not just well known horror but the obscure and sometimes little-discovered gems waiting to be re-discovered.
Not too heavy or academic; interspersed with King's dry humour and oberservation, an approachable way to learn more about how horror really works and why we people are drawn to this subject.
Overall worth reading as a change from just fiction.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By John M. Ford TOP 500 REVIEWER on 5 Jun 2011
Format: Paperback
This book, written using the author's notes from a college course he taught, explores the techniques that horror writers, filmmakers, and television producers use to scare us, entertain us, and keep us coming back for more. Along the way, King explores the horror genre from the 1950's through the 1980's and traces several key influences on his development as a horror fan, then author.

The author finds the roots of modern horror in three "tarot cards" or character archetypes, each represented by a key literary work. Our expectations about "The Vampire" were formed by Bram Stoker's Dracula; we see the essence of "The Werewolf" in the protagonist of Robert Lewis Stevenson's Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde; and experience "The Thing Without a Name" as recurring versions of Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley's Frankenstein. He traces the influence of these themes in written fiction, radio, movies, television and in popular culture.

Most interesting is King's three-level taxonomy of fear reactions. The most refined is "terror" as the suspenseful anticipation of fright which can be induced by a skilful writer with the monsters off-stage. He believes that finely-tuned terror is best achieved through books and radio because they require more active engagement by their audiences. "Horror" is secondary, as we recoil from the hidden monster as it is revealed.
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