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Danny - The Champion Of The World [DVD] [2005]

53 customer reviews

Price: £14.99 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
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Danny - The Champion Of The World [DVD] [2005] + James And The Giant Peach [DVD] [1996] + The BFG Digitally Restored Edition [DVD]
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Product details

  • Actors: Jeremy Irons, Robbie Coltrane, Samuel Irons
  • Directors: Gavin Miller
  • Writers: Roald Dahl
  • Format: PAL
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles For The Hearing Impaired: English
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 4:3 - 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: U
  • Studio: Warner Home Video
  • DVD Release Date: 18 July 2005
  • Run Time: 94 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (53 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0009W9AB4
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 4,760 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Product Description

Set in the English countryside during the 1950s, this adaptation of Roald Dahl's classic novel tells the story of nine-year-old Danny and his widower father William, a poacher who lives in a caravan on a great estate. The lord of the manor wants to turn the land into a housing development, thus pushing William out, but Danny has other plans. As they battle to save their way of life and refuse to give way to the builders, a strong bond grows between father and son.

Synopsis

Danny's life seems perfect: his home is a gypsy caravan, he's the youngest car mechanic around, and his best friend is his dad, who never runs out of wonderful stories to tell. When Danny discovers his father's secret, he's off on the adventure of a lifetime.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

33 of 34 people found the following review helpful By feverpitch96 on 13 Feb. 2006
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This is a wonderfully-realised television version of Roald Dahl's novel. It evokes a golden age of pastoral 1950s England as Dahl does in his book. The chemistry here between real-life father and son Jeremy and Samuel Irons rings true, and Robbie Coltrane's performance creates a suitably vulgar, nasty and stupid Victor Hazell for the viewer to hate.
I would suggest that the admittedly upsetting bloodsport scenes at the film's opening are an essential part of underlining the stupidity and cruelty of men like Hazell and what they like to do for fun, which was surely one of Dahl's key points for comment in the original novel. These scenes are not enough to take away from the film's appropriateness or enjoyability for a family audience, which scores highly indeed.
Regarding Judy Lewis' comment on the aspect ratio of this transfer, the Internet Movie Database lists the original aspect ratio for this film as 1.33:1 (or 4:3). This was a made-for-television film in 1989, so 4:3 would have indeed been the original aspect ratio for this film, and no widescreen edition could therefore exist without severe cropping. This means you are missing nothing of the film with this transfer.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Jamie Sleeman on 13 April 2009
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The heroes are thieves, the local policeman and doctor are both corrupt and the headmaster is a drunk. And these are the good guys! One could also argue that the bad guy is a victim of classicism.
Yes folks, it can only be a film adaptation of a Roald Dahl book, the biggest stalwart of the few remaining bastions that stand against that oncoming, sanitising tsunami that is political correctness and modern thinking.
Is it possible to administer a knighthood or peerage posthumously? If so, I'd like to recommend Dahl for one.
Samuel Johnson noted that the most truthful people in society are children, and thus it is no surprise when you find that a man who died nineteen years ago and set most of his books in societies of yesteryear, is still one of the most popular authors among kids the world over.
Kids know rubbish when they see and hear it, no matter how much inconvenience it causes adults. As a result, the sort of story that is totally free of PC claptrap and suitably dark in the right places, scores very highly with them.

This particular adaptation is one of those rare creatures that improves over the book in certain places. It's also a rare thing among Dahl stories, because the setting is a very normal, everyday one. There are no child-eating giants, lunatic-run chocolate factories, whizzpopping or the Queen of England anywhere in sight.
For those of you who don't know, the eponymous hero is a nine year old boy who lives an idyllic rural life in the mid-1950's, and who has a rather unusual and amazing father.
They run foul of a new, nouveaux-riche landlord who is trying to buy up all the local land for a nefarious scheme and is frustrated because their small plot lies smack in the middle of all his plans.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Adrian on 7 Nov. 2010
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A nice family film with a good cast and well acted with some lovely countryside.It's watchable and nice if you havn't read the book by Roald Dahl,but i can't honestly say that it's totally faithfull to the original script,probably only halfway there,but covering the basic story.But then i'm quite pedantic about films keeping as close to the book as possible,which is why i havn't been keen on previous adaptations of Dahl's books.The home setting of the caravan and workshop were quite good though and the characters well cast.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Jude 48 on 23 July 2005
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I have been waiting for years for the release on DVD of this delightful and timeless film, based of course on Roald Dahl's book. Set in the 1950s, and featuring excellent performances from three generations of the one family (the great Jeremy Irons, his son Sam and Sam's grandfather Cyril Cusack), it is a charming and often amusing tale of poaching, bullying and revenge. The only disappointment - its aspect ratio is 4:3, something not mentioned in the technical specs.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By no1filmaddict on 23 July 2005
I first read the book 'Danny, The Champion Of The World' by Roald Dahl a good few years ago now and did enjoy reading it, and so when i saw that there was a film version i decided to take a look. On the whole its a nice film, very enjoyable for both children and adults alike, and really does bring the book to life.
As you may know if you have read the book yourself or to your children, that Danny is a nine year old boy who lives with his father in a caravan next to a petrol station and garage that they own. One day, he finds out his fathers deepest, darkest secret - poaching. He doesn't like it at first however soon comes round to the idea and when his father falls into a hole dug by the nasty Victor Hazel to catch the poachers on his land, luckily Danny is on hand to help him out. Wanting revenge on Hazel, together they hatch a plan to steal all seven hundred birds from the woods just before Hazel brings up a shooting party.
The cast as a whole are also pretty good with Jeremy Irons as Danny's father and his real life son Samuel Irons as Danny, the hero of the film. The 'baddie' of the film Victor Hazell is played by Robbie Cultrane, who has since gone on to play Hagrid in the on-screen version of the Harry Potter series. Cyril Cusack plays the old Doc Spencer and Jean Marsh plays Miss Hunter.
Overall, 'Danny, The Champion Of The World' is quite a charming little film adapted of the enjoyable childrens book of the same name. I would recommend, especially for children, but parents and older children twelve onwards will probably enjoy it too.
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