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Daniel: The Niv Application Commentary from Biblical Text...to Contemporary Life (The NIV Application Commentary) Hardcover – 1 Apr 1999

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Zondervan (1 April 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0310206081
  • ISBN-13: 978-0310206088
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 2.5 x 24.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 696,297 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

From the Back Cover

Most Bible commentaries take us on a one-way trip from the twentieth century to the first century. But they leave us there, assuming that we can somehow make the return journey on our own. In other words, they focus on the original meaning of the passage but don't discuss its contemporary application. The information they offer is valuable--but the job is only half done! The NIV Application Commentary Series helps us with both halves of the interpretive task. This new and unique series shows readers how to bring an ancient message into modern context. It explains not only what the Bible means but also how it can speak powerfully today.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Daniel 1:1 — 21
In the third year of the reign of Jehoiakim king of Judah, Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon came to Jerusalem and besieged it. And the Lord delivered Jehoiakim king of Judah into his hand, along with some of the articles from the temple of God. These he carried off to the temple of his god in Babylonia and put in the treasure house of his god.
Then the king ordered Ashpenaz, chief of his court officials, to bring in some of the Israelites from the royal family and the nobility – young men without any physical defect, handsome, showing aptitude for every kind of learning, well informed, quick to understand, and qualified to serve in the king’s palace. He was to teach them the language and literature of the Babylonians. The king assigned them a daily amount of food and wine from the king’s table. They were to be trained for three years, and after that they were to enter the king’s service.
Among these were some from Judah: Daniel, Hananiah, Mishael and Azariah. The chief official gave them new names: to Daniel, the name Belteshazzar; to Hananiah, Shadrach; to Mishael, Meshach; and to Azariah, Abednego.
But Daniel resolved not to defile himself with the royal food and wine, and he asked the chief official for permission not to defile himself this way. Now God had caused the official to show favor and sympathy to Daniel, but the official told Daniel, "I am afraid of my lord the king, who has assigned your food and drink. Why should he see you looking worse than the other young men your age? The king would then have my head because of you."
Daniel then said to the guard whom the chief official had appointed over Daniel, Hananiah, Mishael and Azariah, "Please test your servants for ten days: Give us nothing but vegetables to eat and water to drink. Then compare our appearance with that of the young men who eat the royal food, and treat your servants in accordance with what you see." So he agreed to this and tested them for ten days.
At the end of the ten days they looked healthier and better nourished than any of the young men who ate the royal food. So the guard took away their choice food and the wine they were to drink and gave them vegetables instead.
To these four young men God gave knowledge and understanding of all kinds of literature and learning. And Daniel could understand visions and dreams of all kinds.
At the end of the time set by the king to bring them in, the chief official presented them to Nebuchadnezzar. The king talked with them, and he found none equal to Daniel, Hananiah, Mishael and Azariah; so they entered the king’s service. In every matter of wisdom and understanding about which the king questioned them, he found them ten times better than all the magicians and enchanters in his whole kingdom.
And Daniel remained there until the first year of King Cyrus.
The first chapter of the book of Daniel is a distinct unit. It begins and ends with a chronological marker that identifies the beginning and end of Daniel’s career ("the third year of the reign of Jehoiakim" [v. 1] and "the first year of King Cyrus" [v. 21]). In terms of our dating system, this places Daniel’s career from 605 to 539 b.c.1
Daniel 1 provides an introduction for the whole book, plunging us quickly into the action and introducing the main characters of the book. It also illustrates the overarching theme of the book: In spite of present appearances, God is in control. In keeping with the court narratives in chapters 1—6, the first chapter narrates an episode from the experience of Daniel and his three friends that models another important lesson: Though in exile, God gives his people the ability to prosper as well as to be faithful. This chapter, and the book as a whole, must have served as a tremendous encouragement to the faith of those devout exiles who felt as if their whole world had come crashing down on their heads.
This first chapter has the following outline: (1) Jehoiakim delivered into Nebuchadnezzar’s hand (1:1—2); (2) training for service (1:3 —7); (3) avoiding defilement (1:8—16); (4) success given to Daniel and his friends (1:17—20); and (5) the extent of Daniel’s ministry (1:21).
Jehoiakim Delivered into Nebuchadnezzar’s Hand (1:1—2)


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Format: Hardcover
This commentary on Daniel reads very well.
The author writes from an eclectic point of view, neither Dispensational nor Reformed, and with "reserve and caution", (though his reformed background is obvious.)
It is written from the conservative evangelical position, eg, from the Introduction, "...in spite of the difficulties, I interpret the book from the conclusion that the prophecies come from the sixth century B.C."

Why 4 stars and not 5? Because the discussion on one very interesting section has been "ommitted", either by intent or on purpose.
Concerning the latter part of chapter 9, Gabriel's message concerning the "seventy sevens", the author gives a brief introduction, then states, "In the next section, we will delve further, but with great caution, into the morass of interpretations of this enigmatic oracle." Search as you may, you won't find any "further" discussion on this section!

It's surprising that the editors and proofreaders never spotted this glaring ommission, and it mars an otherwise excellent introductory-intermediate, narrative style Commentary.

For a short (six page), overview of some interpretations of the "seventy sevens", I would reccommend Joyce G. Baldwin's Commentary in the Tyndale series, although this would be my second choice commentary overall.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I bought this book to accompany a series of studies we had undertaken to find out about Daniel the man of God. I timeline of where Daniel and other named people fit in would be a bonus
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I am enjoying this book, because it bridges the gap between the original readers of Daniel and Christians today.
As with all the books in the bible, Daniel has had its critics!
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
An very good book for gaining deeper insight into the book of Daniel. An excellent tool for preparing Sunday school, preaching or general study.
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Format: Hardcover
Tremper Longman is an excellent author but £194 is a wee bit over priced. You could buy a barrel of oil, although it wouldn't do you much good spiritually, and would ruin your car...

Okay overdue an update. This is a helpful commentary as are many in this series, (interestingly he refers to Harold Campings failed predictions the first time around in the 80's) what I have foundhelpful is how he has thought through many of his applications and like many in this series prove really helpful.
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