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Danger's Hour: The Story of the USS Bunker Hill and the Kamikaze Pilot Who Crippled Her
 
 

Danger's Hour: The Story of the USS Bunker Hill and the Kamikaze Pilot Who Crippled Her [Kindle Edition]

Maxwell Taylor Kennedy
3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)

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In the closing months of World War II, Americans found themselves facing a new and terrifying weapon: kamikazes -- the first men to use airplanes as suicide weapons.

By the beginning of 1945, American pilots were shooting down Japanese planes more than ten to one. The Japanese had so few metals left that the military had begun using wooden coins and clay pots for hand grenades. For the first time in 800 years, Japan faced imminent invasion. As Germany faltered, the combined strength of every warring nation gathered at Japan's door. Desperate, Japan turned to its most idealistic young men -- the best and brightest college students -- and demanded of them the greatest sacrifice.

On the morning of May 11, 1945, days after the Nazi surrender, the USS Bunker Hill -- a magnificent vessel that held thousands of crewmen and the most sophisticated naval technology available -- was holding at the Pacific Theater, 70 miles off the coast of Okinawa.

At precisely 9:58 a.m., Kiyoshi Ogawa radioed in to his base at Kanoya, 350 miles from the Bunker Hill, "I found the enemy vessels." After eighteen months of training, Kiyoshi tucked a comrade's poem into his breast pocket and flew his Zero five hours across the Pacific. Now the young Japanese pilot had located his target and was on the verge of fulfilling his destiny. At 10:02.30 a.m., as he hovered above the Bunker Hill, hidden in a mass of clouds, Kiyoshi spoke his last words: "Now, I am nose-diving into the ship."

The attack killed 393 Americans and was the worst suicide attack against America until September 11. Juxtaposing Kiyoshi's story with the stories of untold heroism of the men aboard the Bunker Hill, Maxwell Taylor Kennedy details how American sailors and airmen worked together, risking their own lives to save their fellows and ultimately triumphing in their efforts to save their ship.

Drawing on years of research and firsthand interviews with both American and Japanese survivors, Maxwell Taylor Kennedy draws a gripping portrait of men bravely serving their countries in war and the advent of a terrifying new weapon, suicide bombing, that nearly halted the most powerful nation in the world.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1609 KB
  • Print Length: 513 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster (11 Nov 2008)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B003YUCGIC
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  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,061,979 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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By Darth Maciek TOP 500 REVIEWER
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
This thing is amongst the WORST military history books I read in my life - and I read certainly more than a thousand of them!

Maxwell Taylor Kennedy, son of Robert Kennedy, wrote a book about the aircraft carrier USS "Bunker Hill", the horrible kamikaze attack which devastated her on 11 May 1945 and the desperate struggle to save this precious ship from sinking. The good idea was to mix this great tale with the story of life of two kamikaze pilots, Kiyoshi Ogawa and Yasunori Seizo, who made this attack. This could have been a great book about a great tragedy in which 373 US sailors died and 46 more were declared MIA. However, the execution of this good idea was ABYSMALLY BAD! Below, the reasons why I consider this thing as an utter disaster.

1. ERRORS, ERRORS, ERRORS - on every single page! And on 463 pages, that it is A LOT! Here are some examples:

- Lt John Powers "crash-dived" INTO Japanese carrier "Shokaku". Sorry - he didn't! He hit the "Shokaku" with a bomb and then was downed by Japanese anti-aircraft guns and his plane crashed into the ocean. He was awarded Medal of Honor for this and those facts are therefore matter of public record.

- "the dogged resistance of Bataan and Corregidor played an important role in the Solomons fight" !! No, it didn't. The Solomon's campaign began on 7 August 1942, THREE months after the fight for Corregidor was over (Bataan surrendered even before).

- "Mustang and Lightning fighters couldn't land on carriers and therefore were of little utility in Pacific War" - is this guy for real? Lightnings operating from Henderson Field were crucially important in Guadalcanal campaign and they were also the planes which intercepted and killed Yamamoto himself!
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5.0 out of 5 stars In Dangers Hour !! 24 Oct 2010
Format:Hardcover
This transaction from Amazon was its normal faultless experience. The book arrived well within the timeline and was exactly as described. Superb read !!!!!!. I well remember seeing a documentary on the story on History Channel. It is always nice to read the story as well as there were so many hero's that saved that carrier that should have been lost. Well recommended. 5 Stars
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Amazon.com: 4.0 out of 5 stars  104 reviews
73 of 82 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Worthy Kamikaze Project Crashes & Burns from Fatal Errors 8 Dec 2008
By Check Six - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
Where "Danger's Hour" succeeds is wholly in the human element, describing relationships among Americans and Japanese combatants. Undoubtedly that aspect will find favor among generalist readers and reviewers who care little about ships, aircraft, or history.

Sailors, aviators and historians: stand by to be repelled.

Mr. Kennedy knows almost nothing of his core subject: naval aviation. There are literally scores of errors that would have been avoided by competent fact checkers. For instance, we are told that Admiral Marc Mitscher learned to fly "soon after graduating from Annapolis" and became Naval Aviator Number 17. Actually, he was No. 33 six years after graduating. That information is readily available in a casual Internet search.

Basic chronology of the Pacific War is too often muffed, with overlapping accounts of events 1942-43 and again in 1944-45. The Guadalcanal campaign is especially convoluted.

Kennedy's attempts at describing aviation matters inevitably fail. He has bombs attached to Corsairs' landing gear (!) and his description of the Mitsubishi Zero defies explanation. His effort to explain aerodynamics becomes unfathomable.

Nor is he better with nautical subjects. Throughout, the book refers to a ship's "tunnels" (presumably passageways), "ceilings", and "hanger decks." The naval term "head" is properly used once amid "bathrooms," "restrooms," and "lavatories."

Historical facts take repeated hits. Allegedly Vice Admiral Ozawa took four carriers to Leyte Gulf without aircraft or escorts. We are told that Maj. Gen. Curtis LeMay refused to send B-29s against kamikaze bases, then we read multiple accounts that state otherwise. (In truth, XXI Bomber Command diverted from Japanese industrial targets to airfields in support of the Okinawa invasion.) A Marine pilot, then-Captain James Swett, is repeatedly cited as "Colonel" when in fact he gained that rank 20 years later.

The final manuscript still requires editing. Grammatical errors abound, especially mixing subjects and pronouns. ("Japan was devastated; they had almost no fuel.") Furthermore, the author unnecessarily inserts himself into the narrative: "Mr. X told me" rather than merely "Mr. X said..."

The publicity promoting "Danger's Hour" often descends into puffery. A noted scholar proclaims that kamikazes remain "one of the little known aspects of WW II." Another statement says that VE-Day in Europe, five weeks previously, has overshadowed Bunker Hill's story for 65 years. (Actually, the Navy released the news a month later.) The promotional material even states that Bunker Hill's survival "proved crucial to Allied victory" though she never returned to service.

This is pretty poor stuff, especially since the story has stood on its own merit since 1945. Yet 21st century values sometimes are imposed upon WW II subjects. No better example exists than the assertion that all Bunker Hill fliers were "challenged by the guilt of homicide." Not some, not most--all of them. (This reviewer has known many Bunker Hill aviators and not one ever expressed such maudlin sentiments.)

The debrief: though "Danger's Hour" receives credit for an innovative, ambitious approach, it may charitably be characterized as inadequate. That's a shame: properly executed, it could have been magnificent.

Two stars.
23 of 28 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Excellent subject, appallingly bad writing and absolutely no editing 26 April 2009
By J. Biallas - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
The story of the Essex class fast carriers of TF58/TF38 is one that deserves telling. That the ships of the Big Blue Team bore the brunt of combat at sea in the Pacific War is unquestioned. Books like the "Big E" and the "Little Giants" are well-written expositions of fact combined with personal stories that illuminate the subject and are timeless. Telling the whole story of the Essex class in general, and the tragic story of the USS Bunker Hill in particular, would be a welcome addition to the available literature .

Unfortunately, this is not that book.

It is a disorganized mass of inaccurate, convoluted, virtually unreadable gibberish.

The most mundane facts regarding the US Navy, its ships and aircraft as well as those of the Japanese Empire are unknown to this author.

The editors, fact checkers and other support staff at Simon and Schuster who allowed this incredibly bad imitation of a history to be published should be fired, now.

I have read the 5 star reviews of this book on this site and have concluded that they must have read a different book than I did, or did not read it at all. I did read it all, and wished I had not done so.
27 of 34 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars One of the worst books ever written about WWII 15 Dec 2008
By George Setzer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
This book takes a major hit on the facts. I'm not sure if it was poor research, bad fact checking or just plain old fashioned bad editing.

It seemed that there was a major fact error every other page....It got so bad that I only read the first 180 pages, had to put it down and then returned it to the bookstore and got a refund.

I'll just site 4 very bad mistakes. There were so many that I can not list all of them in just this short review.

1. He attributes the Japanese loss of 4 carriers at Midway to mistakes made by Yamamoto the commander Combined Fleet. Any person with even a modest amount of knowledge about WWII knows that Nagumo had tactical command of the carrier task force at Midway and it was his decisions about ordinance that delayed the 2nd strike and therefore the carriers were caught with their CAP chasing the US torpedo attack surviviors.

2. He refers to a pilot named John Dixon (or Hixon?) as an Avenger pilot while describing the Battle of Coral Sea. The Avenger's debut was at Midway a month later and only in small numbers as part of the Island defense force.

3. He stated that the Bunker Hill was sold for scrap in 1989 and was the last of the Essex Class carriers. He was wrong on 2 points with that statement. It was sold for scrap in 1973 after being decomissioned in 1966 (source is Danfs). The last Essex Class carrier was to my knowledge the Lexington and was either deactivated or sold for scrap in 1991!!!!

4. The most egregious was that he stated the Japanese had forknowledge of the amphibious operation against Leyte because they were warned by......wait for it......The Soviet Union!!!!!! Japan's traditional enemy.

Regarding #4...there is a problem with this statement and many statements throughout the book, there are no notes citing the source!!! Did he just decide to make up facts on the fly to get the book out for the Holidays?

He can't even get the 1st commander of the Bunker Hill correct. It was not George Seitz but J.J. Ballentine. I may be spelling his last name incorrectly.

This was without question one of the worst books I have ever read on a WWII subject.

I returned this thing to the store and got my [...] bucks back and bought a movie.
12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars WHERE IS, REPEAT WHERE IS THE EDITOR...THE WORLD WONDERS 1 May 2010
By Mr. B - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
Maxwell Taylor Kennedy, billed as an Associate Scholar with an interest in maritime history at the John Carter Brown Library, a Center for Advanced Research in History and the Humanities at Brown University, has an interesting idea in DANGER'S HOUR, to juxtapose the parallel stories of an Essex-class aircraft carrier, the USS Bunker Hill, with that of Kiyoshi Ogawa, a Japanese student conscript who is ultimately 'volunteered' for the kamikaze corps. These parallel stories intersect on May 11, 1945, when Ogawa and his wingman crashed into the USS Bunker Hill, killing and injuring over 700 men, and knocking the Bunker Hill out of the war for the duration.

There is only one major problem: Kennedy isn't much of an historian and, if anything, a worse writer.

Other reviewers have already detailed the many factual gaffes sprinkled throughout the book's pages. There are plenty others--the two typhoons that saved Japan from the Mongols were in 1274 and 1281, not 1281 and 1284. Equally disturbing, the book is replete with numerous seeming inconsistencies. For example, on page 337, two aviators are described as "crawl[ing] across the deck, trying to keep their heads and bodies below the level of flying debris" to get to two nearby planes. Yet on the very next page the same two pilots "together leapt up from the catwalk and sprinted to the Avengers. After retrieving both raft containers, they raced back across the flight deck...." Crawl or sprint--which is it? On page 205 Kennedy describes the final aerial assault on Japan's super battleship, the Yamato, as the approaching torpedo pilots skim above the water. As they close in, antiaircraft fire lights up the sky. Every enemy ship is firing "their AA guns flashing white as the antiaircraft fire hurled skyward." How will this prevent the attack when the enemy is approaching, as Kennedy states, at 60 feet above the waves?

These kinds of flaws and inconsistencies could have (and should have) been caught by a good editor, or any editor. What is perhaps harder to fix is Kennedy's writing style--it is not simply bad--it is awful. The tortured circumlocutions, the fractured phraseology, are the verbal equivalent of nails being scratched across a chalkboard. In one Japanese attack, the nearby USS Enterprise "was near-missed four times." (p. 214). Because the Japanese government was leery of "obliterating all freedom of thought," college students "were given more freedom of thought than any other group in Japan." (p. 86). One can only wonder how freedom of thought is 'given' to anyone (or obliterated for that matter), let alone how a ship is 'near-missed.' After student conscripts are told they will become kamikazes, they blow off their frustration by rampaging through town, "cutting their way through the...doors of frail restaurants...." (p. 186). A door may be frail, but an entire restaurant? Burning badly, the Bunker Hill's captain attempts to clear the decks: "Seitz would use what was then called centrifugal force to tip the ship, and push everything out." (p. 351). What is centrifugal force now called, pray tell? The author even manages to take a simple idea, and convolute the sentence until it yields up an entirely unexpected meaning: "They made their way twenty-five feet below the waterline of a vessel that many thought was sinking into one of the engineering rooms." (p. 378). Where was the vessel heading? Again, where was the editor? I could go on, but you get the idea.

Kennedy's prose is often the purplish/overwrought style more typical of a junior high school term paper. Nights are "unimaginably dark," beaches are "staggeringly beautiful," blasts are "impossibly loud," flare-ups are of "staggering brightness," one suicide crash dive is described as "sibylline," the meaning of which wholly escaped this reviewer. Kennedy's favorite action words, however, are 'annihilate,' and especially 'obliterate.' Domestic political freedoms are 'annihilated' by the military junta during the Taisho dynasty (p. 30). The Bunker Hill's pilots annihilate the Japanese in every confrontation (p. 165). Better yet, the Yamato isn't simply sunk, it is obliterated (all 70,000 tons of it); freedom of thought itself is in danger of being obliterated (as noted above); indeed, within a nine-page span (pp. 292-301), Kennedy describes a kamikaze pilot, a mule tractor, the two men operating it, the deck edge elevator, and a hapless sailor closing down a hatch, as all having been obliterated. (Since obliterate typically means to destroy completely, leaving no trace, it is somewhat oxymoronic for Kennedy to caption one of his photos "note the obliterated mule tractor....") As a final example of the clumsy wording (and dubious historical analysis), which epitomizes the entire book, consider Kennedy's final judgment on the Japanese war effort: "One reason that Japanese imperialism failed so severely [?] is probably that the Japanese, perhaps more than any other nationality, intensely dislike living outside their home country." (p. 258). Try telling that to the inhabitants of Tinian and Saipan and those of Manchuria, who had been living under Japanese overlords since the 1920s and the 1930s, respectively.

As some other reviewers have suggested, many of the five-star reviews follow a suspiciously similar story line. In the interests of full disclosure, some of these reviewers (at least 12 by my count---Caslin, Gillespie, Campbell, Riva, Idler, Reiss, Meyer, Wilcox, Falanga, Soll, Freeman, Ward and Binder (twice)) should have mentioned that they all received a shout-out from Kennedy in his acknowledgements section --some for having "helped,"---hardly the source of a disinterested review (all, not surprising, gave the book five stars). What is harder to fathom, however, is what influenced people like Doris Kearns Goodwin and others to lavish their praises on this book---clearly they did not read the same book I did.

One hopes that the next time Kennedy has a good idea and an urge to write US history, he will hire not one, but two, editors---one to clean up the factual errors and another to eliminate (or, obliterate, if you will) the writing faux pas that he seems prone to. Perhaps then a worthy book will emerge. I'll take a pass.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars "Noblesse oblige" - and here this obligation was NOT fullfilled! 13 Aug 2013
By Darth Maciek - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This thing is amongst the WORST military history books I read in my life - and I read certainly more than a thousand of them!

Maxwell Taylor Kennedy, son of Robert Kennedy, wrote a book about the aircraft carrier USS "Bunker Hill", the horrible kamikaze attack which devastated her on 11 May 1945 and the desperate struggle to save this precious ship from sinking. The good idea was to mix this great tale with the story of life of two kamikaze pilots, Kiyoshi Ogawa and Yasunori Seizo, who made this attack. This could have been a great book about a great tragedy in which 373 US sailors died and 46 more were declared MIA. However, the execution of this good idea was ABYSMALLY BAD! Below, the reasons why I consider this thing as an utter disaster.

1. ERRORS, ERRORS, ERRORS - on every single page! And on 528 pages, that it is A LOT! Here are some examples:

- Lt John Powers "crash-dived" INTO Japanese carrier "Shokaku". Sorry - he didn't! He hit the "Shokaku" with a bomb and then was downed by Japanese anti-aircraft guns and his plane crashed into the ocean. He was awarded Medal of Honor for this and those facts are therefore matter of public record.

- "the dogged resistance of Bataan and Corregidor played an important role in the Solomons fight" !! No, it didn't. The Solomon's campaign began on 7 August 1942, THREE months after the fight for Corregidor was over (Bataan surrendered even before).

- "Mustang and Lightning fighters couldn't land on carriers and therefore were of little utility in Pacific War" - is this guy for real? Lightnings operating from Henderson Field were crucially important in Guadalcanal campaign and they were also the planes which intercepted and killed Yamamoto himself! As for land based Mustangs, they were crucial especially in 1944-45, when escorting the bombers attacking Japan!

- "Zero fighter carried a single 7,5mm gun which could do considerable damage but its 20-mm machine guns were ineffective". So... the heavier guns were ineffective, but the little one could do more damage!? I can't believe how it is possible to let such an obvious idiocy in the text! In fact the Zero carried two 7,5mm machine guns and two 20-mm guns - and the latter were indeed more efficient than the former...

- "on 20 October 1944 the first kamikaze pilot, Yukio Seki, attacked USS "Kitkun Bay" and damaged her heavily killing 16 men". NO, HE DIDN'T! He crashed into USS "St.Lo" and sunk her. USS "Kitkun Bay" suffered only a near miss by a kamikaze that day, losing one man killed... This 20 October 1944 fight is a famous episode - how on Earth could somebody make a mistake there??

- Vice-Admiral Ozawa took four carriers to Leyte Gulf without aircraft or escorts. FALSE! He had 108 planes on his carriers and his screen was composed of two battleships, three cruisers and nine destroyers. This is an information available on the internet - it takes like 30 seconds to find it.

- Maj. Gen. Curtis LeMay refused to send B-29s against kamikaze bases during Okinawa campaign. BULL****! Later in the SAME BOOK it is repeated many times the he actually DID SEND B-29s against kamikaze bases!

- "by 1945 Japan manufactured almost nothing". Absolutely - except for HUNDREDS of tanks, planes, anti-tank guns and special weapons (Ohka flying bomb, Kaiten human torpedo, etc.) and DOZENS of warships (Tachibana class destroyers, Ukuru, Type C and Type D class escorts, Sentoku class giant submarines, I-201 class medium submarines, Kairyu class midget submarines, suicide motor boats, etc.) EVERY MONTH UNTIL SEPTEMBER!

- the loss of four carriers at Midway is attributed to the mistakes committed during the battle by Yamamoto. But he was not in tactical command and was NOT EVEN PRESENT at the battle - it was Vice-Admiral Nagumo who commanded this day!

- we are told that Grumman Avengers were used at Coral Sea. FALSE! Their operational debut was Midway - and even then there was only six of them available at that moment.

- we are told that Soviet Union warned Japan about Leyte Gulf landings! That is sheer LUNACY! Soviets had no way to know it, had no interest in sharing it with the Japanese and last but not least, in REAL HISTORY the Japanese were actually SURPRISED by Leyte Gulf landings and therefore didn't react immediately!

- when air operations are described we are told that bombs were attached to Corsair's - wait, hold it, here it goes... LANDING GEAR...))) I almost died laughing at that moment!

- according to this book "all students at the top Japanese universities were gathered together and became kamikaze". Not some, not even a majority - ALL! Well, this is just another obvious case of BULL****! In reality there were about 4000 kamikazes who took off and died in those missions in 1944 and 1945. Most of them were already in aviation in 1944 or earlier - the number of university students more or less pressed into kamikaze units was in fact very limited (hundreds rather than thousands) and even amongst those who trained to become kamikaze pilots, many didn't go for a mission because the war ended

- it is said that "Yamato" was armed with 18-inch guns (that is correct) which could fire shells "the size of a VW". Well, author is welcome to try to fit a Volkswagen (any model of it) into an 18-inch (457mm) hole...))) And I want to watch it with popcorn and a beer...)))

- author claims that when USS "Franklin" was damaged and was burning, her crew was "locked down the inside of the ship and left there by their comrades to rot until Pearl Harbor". This is a HORRIBLE LIE! Exactly the opposite was true! An enormous effort was made to save every single sailor on USS "Franklin", for 48 hours, amongst raging fires, exploding ordonnance and under Japanese bombs! Why say such a horribly false thing? It is BEYOND my ken!

- etc, etc, etc. ON EVERY SINGLE PAGE!

2. Complete lack of editing. I usually do not consider poor editing as a major problem, but in this book it makes the reading almost impossible, especially for anybody who has even the slightest idea about the Pacific War! Typos are crawling in virtually every place where any kind of military equipement is concerned!

3. Author clearly has a big problem with English language. Being Polish I am not a native speaker and in fact English is only my second foreign language (after French) - but even me I would not make some errors which I found in "Danger's hour". Possibly the worst example: author writes at one moment after the kamikaze attack "in one moment USS "Bunker Hill" and its crew became expendable" - before describing the incredible efforts of other US warships to save her... I really wondered at that moment if author knows what "expendable" means...

4. Author simply invents things. At one moment he writes about US pilots who sunk some Japanese ships and bombed Japanese bases "all Bunker Hill fliers were challenged by the guilt of homicide." Not some, not most - all of them! Well, funny, but he somehow never cites even one real veteran who said such a thing - and I read enough books of Pacific War to know tha American soldiers, fliers, sailors and Marines were very much OK with the war they were fighting!

5. But the CHERRY ON THE CAKE is the conclusion! Author writes: "The challenging lesson of the Pacific War may not so much be that aicraft carriers can extend American foreign policy across the world, but rather that a few determined men, willing ot give their lives for a cause, may block that policy from ever being fullfilled". In my life I read already many things idiotic beyond belief, but that one really takes the cake! EVERYTHING described in this book proves the exact opposite - even the sacrifice of 4000 kamikazes didn't prevent USA from winning the Pacific War and liberating countless millions of Asians from Japanese tyranny.

For all those reasons, I consider this book to be not only a FAILURE, but also an INSULT to the memory of all sailors who fought (and for many died) on board of USS "Bunker Hill" on this fateful 11 May 1945. And I believe author should be ashamed of himself too! When one belongs to a great patrician family and has all the time and money needed to make research and work on such a book, when one is the son of such an eminent man and when one is named after another, even more eminent man (General Maxwell Taylor), well, then "NOBLESSE OBLIGE"!

But author simply didn't care about this obligation and when one looks at his biography, it is not so hard to see why. Born in 1965, educated in history and law, Maxwell T. Kennedy started a career as Assistant District Attorney in Philadelphia in 1992 - but interrupted it after only three years. Since then he never held a real job! He got work as Director of Robert Kennedy Memorial, a NGO owned by Kennedy clan, then he got successive sinecures at Boston College, Georgetown University and Brown University and another NGO, the Pearl Coalition. According to his biography he spend all his life until now travelling around the world and talking to different people about human rights.

All this shows clearly a guy who is rich, connected and has no ambitions nor will to really work. The publication of this book in 2008 was clearly supposed to fill a little bit his rather empty CV - and this thing received some extravagant praise from all kind of prestigious intellectuals conncted to Kennedy clan and Democratic establishment...

Well, no matter how much praise this thing gets from prestigious intellectuals, as a simple military history buff and a simple amateur of good books, I say "STAY AWAY FROM THIS PIECE OF CR@P". And if you want to read an AMAZING book about a US aircraft carrier damaged by the Japanese and saved by the heroism of her crew, read "Inferno" by Joseph A. Springer, about the ordeal of USS "Franklin" - a book which was well researched, well written, carefully edited, all of which took many years of hard work by a REAL historian - not a spoiled, jaded, rich brat...
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