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Dangerous Women Part 2 Paperback – 23 Oct 2014


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Product details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Voyager (23 Oct. 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0007549431
  • ISBN-13: 978-0007549436
  • Product Dimensions: 19.6 x 1.9 x 13 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 340,561 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

‘Reads like Martin’s outline for a Game of Thrones prequel that never was’ Entertainment Weekly

‘This meaty collection delivers something for nearly every reader’s taste as it explores the heights that brave women can reach and the depths that depraved ones can plumb’ Publisher’s Weekly

About the Author

George R.R. Martin is the author of fifteen novels and novellas, including five volumes of A Song of Ice and Fire, several collections of short stories, as well as screenplays for television and feature films. Dubbed ‘the American Tolkien’, George R.R. Martin has won numerous awards including the World Fantasy Lifetime Achievement Award. He is an Executive Producer on HBO’s Emmy Award-winning Game of Thrones, which is based on his A Song of Ice and Fire series. He lives in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Gardner Dozois is an American science fiction author and editor. He is the founding editor of The Year's Best Science Fiction anthologies. He also edited Asimov's Science Fiction magazine. He has twice won the Nebula Award for Best Short Story.


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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

By Susie Suey on 24 Jan. 2015
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Overall rating: ★★★☆☆ - Sort of liked/OK. Each story is reviewed individually below.

1/7: The Girl in the Mirror by Lev Grossman
★★★★☆ - Really liked

Now this one was right up my alley and I really liked it! I've since read that The Magicians series (of which this was a tale taken out of that world) has been likened to Harry Potter, so a more adult-orientated version, but based on this story I wouldn't necessarily agree (although it does have some direct HP references nestled inside it). You have all the magical goings on, done, perhaps, in a more "grown-up" style, yet I wouldn't directly liken it to any other series I've read. It's done in a very individual way. The writer's style is quite unique too, which takes a little bit of getting used to. In some ways I would say it was more like the writing of Tom Holt or Terry Pratchett, but not completely so. I guess, in a way, you could say it's more realistic, by using "everyday" language. But however anyone else would like to describe it, I'd just describe it as this: "fun"! It is definitely enough for me to want to check out the main works from The Magicians series.

2/7: A Queen in Exile by Sharon Kay Penman
★★★★★ - Loved it/couldn't put it down

What a wonderful story! It is the first I've read of any of SKP's works, but I had already added a couple of her works to my eventual "to read" list. I can say that, based on reading this story, that it is unlikely that I will be disappointed.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mrs Bridget Gillet on 21 Jan. 2015
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Virgins is wonderful.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 8 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
unimaginative, clichéd, victimizing 19 Jan. 2015
By Kazel F Law - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
The authors appear to have all struggled with what makes a woman dangerous. Every author but one has decided that their heroines need to be first raped. This book needs to be renamed 'raped women'. The some are either raped, threatened with rape, or whores. Sometimes the whores get raped too. Sometimes children get raped, the worst was a detailed account of the rape of an eleven year old girl. Seriously disappointed in a book that appears to celebrate women with power but reminds us constantly that nothing is as convenient as a rape to inspire us to seek revenge and find power. George avoided raping his heroines, but raped whole villages of women instead, just because, y'know, raping and looting, right?
Sort of liked/OK 24 Jan. 2015
By Susie Suey - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Overall rating: ★★★☆☆ - Sort of liked/OK. Each story is reviewed individually below.

1/7: The Girl in the Mirror by Lev Grossman
★★★★☆ - Really liked

Now this one was right up my alley and I really liked it! I've since read that The Magicians series (of which this was a tale taken out of that world) has been likened to Harry Potter, so a more adult-orientated version, but based on this story I wouldn't necessarily agree (although it does have some direct HP references nestled inside it). You have all the magical goings on, done, perhaps, in a more "grown-up" style, yet I wouldn't directly liken it to any other series I've read. It's done in a very individual way. The writer's style is quite unique too, which takes a little bit of getting used to. In some ways I would say it was more like the writing of Tom Holt or Terry Pratchett, but not completely so. I guess, in a way, you could say it's more realistic, by using "everyday" language. But however anyone else would like to describe it, I'd just describe it as this: "fun"! It is definitely enough for me to want to check out the main works from The Magicians series.

2/7: A Queen in Exile by Sharon Kay Penman
★★★★★ - Loved it/couldn't put it down

What a wonderful story! It is the first I've read of any of SKP's works, but I had already added a couple of her works to my eventual "to read" list. I can say that, based on reading this story, that it is unlikely that I will be disappointed.

The story focusses around a point in history that I am not familiar with, the battle for the throne of Sicily and the daring of Constance de Hauteville, an aging woman married to the heir to the Holy Roman Empire who's yet to fall pregnant in a time that's not at all friendly for women. Her bravery and courage turn circumstances that could have been disastrous for her into ones that help to secure both her future and the future of her beloved Sicily itself.

Whilst slow to start, it gradually gathered pace into a tremendous finish, by which time I had full sympathy for Constance and her plight. Thus it wins the first full five stars of any of the DW stories I've read so far.

3/7: Pronouncing Doom by S.M. Stirling
★★★☆☆ - Sort of liked/OK

Now I must admit that my opinion of Mr. Stirling is a bit coloured thanks to a collaboration I read of his with Raymond E. Feist, Jimmy the Hand. Now the story felt lose and I felt it could have been a lot better, but apparently Stirling messed up, had written something else than what had been agreed upon and handed it all in late with only two weeks to finalise. So therefore not the best introduction to Stirling, albeit from the part of a collaboration.

So I went into reading this story a bit sceptically, expecting it to not be up to par, especially after the wonderful stories I'd read before this one. And, I have to say... Well, it didn't fall short of my expectations, but failed to fully impress me and change my already dented opinion of the author's work.

Overall I would say that it wasn't a bad story, but there are some fluffed-up bits that irritated me somewhat, so I feel that it's unlikely I'll be able to fully enjoy the main works from this universe. Some of the ideas certainly good ones, and gave a suggestion how man would adapt to survive in a sort of post-apocalyptic world. But the way he draws in the characters and presents them is a bit too ridiculous. And one thing I can't stand in books that are trying to be serious is overly written-out pronunciations. No doubt written for an American audience to describe how the one English guy in the book, of West Country descent, would sound like. Just makes reading it even more ridiculous.

The only thing that keeps it at three stars rather than lower is the fact that the whole seemed to hold together and, once the story was moving, it wasn't hard to imagine or get a feel for the characters.

4/7: Lies My Mother Told Me by Caroline Spector
★☆☆☆☆ - Really disliked/hated/DNF

Eurgh. After my first five star out of all the DW stories, here comes the first one star.

Well, first of all, it's hard to pack a story with multiple POVs into a few pages. But that's what Spector tried to do. And failed. I mean, when you've got less than a page spent on one viewpoint, unless you yourself are a superhero, it makes it incredibly hard to follow.

What probably doesn't help me is that I've never read any of the Wild Cards books. So it may have helped me gain a sympathy for the universe if I had. Yet the way Spector writes her heroes, it just wasn't that believable at all. It made it all sound stupid and ridiculous. It's fantasy, so of course there will be parts that would be unbelievable to our world. Yet the nature of fantasy writing is to make these fantastical ideas believable to the world they're set in. I just didn't get that at all.

As for sympathy for the characters... Well, that was extremely hard to achieve with the too-quick perspective shifting. Plus there wasn't enough in each perspective to really build the characters up into anything more than one-dimensional penny pieces.

And lastly, that ending... I deliberately kept reading, despite my anger and distaste throughout, hoping something that would come along that would redeem the author and the story for me. But with the poor editing, revealing more grammatical errors than any other story I've read thus far, then the pretty stupid ending, I was just glad to have gotten it over and done with.

So, I did my part, I tried my best, I gave the story every chance I could. But ultimately I feel stupid for having carried on with the story when I could have skipped. The only positive is that I now know to avoid this author's works.

5/7: Name the Beast by Sam Sykes
★★★☆☆ - Sort of liked/OK

This was a bizarre story and I wasn't too sure what to make of it. There were two viewpoints that were like two sides of a coin, slowly coming together to complete the story, one side learning from the other. That in and of itself was obvious in parts, each side calling the other "beast" in their fervour to be done with the other.

Yet I guess the bizarreness was to do with the "foreign" nature of the unknown creature's thinking, the species described so individually well yet with so little time to expand upon it.

Overall not a bad story with a warm ending. I guess, once I get used to Syke's style, I could come to like his writing. This story certainly hasn't put me off of trying out this young author's other works.

6/7: Second Arabesque, Very Slowly by Nancy Kress
★★★☆☆ - Sort of liked/OK

Another post-apocalyptic story, except with completely different reasons and consequences. It was interesting, but at the same time quite frustrating.

For one thing, she spends far too much time describing what things were like or why they happened or why things are as they are. The most complicated part about this is that there's a section where she slips from her past-tense narrative into present tense. It makes that section feel awkward and out of place.

The story itself was vaguely interesting. There were times when I was happily following along. But it just could have been written so much better.

7/7: Virgins by Diana Gabaldon
★★★☆☆ - Sort of liked/OK

So, here we go, the final story, the story which many people only picked up this second book part to read...

I have read varying reviews about Gabaldon in the past, mostly scathing, via friends whose opinion I trust. But, I decided, here was my chance to give the author a go, try it all out for myself, being as I was in the process of reading all the other Dangerous Women stories (and, to my credit, I haven't yet skipped one).

And what confronted me was a mixed bag. First of all, you have a historical adventure story, of which I have no idea how accurate it is. The French were allied to Scotland, so perhaps it's not so surprising to see our Scottish "heroes" wind up there. But here's the bit that bothers me - it is one thing, writing out how they are pronouncing words when they are speaking in English. It's quite another when they are speaking in French or even Hebrew or their own tongue. Jamie is supposed to be able to speak French with a flawless Parisian accent. Now, assuming when he speaks to these people time and again, after it already having been noted that he'd spoken to them in French the first time around, what the hell is he doing further along the line speaking French with a Scottish brogue?!

The violence seemed par for the course and not quite to the levels I've heard it appears in some of her other stories. The story itself was readable, made sense, to a degree, and it wasn't too hard to gain sympathy for our "heroes". I can understand why many fall for their charms. But, hmmm... I somewhat enjoyed it, but nowhere near enough.
Five Stars 29 Nov. 2014
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
Really enjoyed these stories
Five Stars 15 Jan. 2015
By Cindy - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
Enjoyed it...
Five Stars 11 Jan. 2015
By tnracer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
Excellent.
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