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Dangerous Visions (S.F. Masterworks)
 
 

Dangerous Visions (S.F. Masterworks) [Kindle Edition]

Harlan Ellison
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)

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Review

Dangerous Visions is a landmark in science fiction, one that can proudly stand against those literary snobs who look down their nose at the genre (Antony Jones SFBOOKREVIEWS blog 2012-03-09)

Book Description

One of the most influential anthologies of all time returns to print, as relevant now as when it was first published.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
24 of 25 people found the following review helpful
Format:Paperback
.....make sure its this one. Originally published in 1967 and now reissued by IBooks in three different covers, this is one of the landmark works in science fiction, an essential read for anyone interested in the field, and a kick in the intellectuals for those who demean the world of SF for its lack of ‘quality writing’. Here are 33 stories with not a bad one among them.Certainly some are better than others, and some will leave you wondering what on earth they were meant to be about. But some will stimulate, some will thrill and a few, just a few, may change the way you view life. And that’s a few more than in most anthologies available nowadays. Honourable mentions go to Theodore Sturgeon’s “If all Men Were Brothers Would You Let One Marry Your Sister?”, Larry Niven’s “Jigsaw Man”, Fritz Leiber’s “Gonna Roll the Bones”, Spinrad’s “Carcinoma Angels”, and Philip Jose Farmer’s wild and weird ‘Riders of the Purple Wage’. Even the UK gets included with fine stories by Brian Aldiss and J G Ballard. Ellison provides a useful introduction to each story. It’s obvious from these short pieces that he’s passionately enthusiastic about both the writers and their subject matter. Allowing each writer an afterword to their story is an interesting device which works on some occasions and not others. Apparently this book has been in print ever since it was published but this is the first time I’ve been able to get hold of a copy . I suggest you take advantage of this opportunity to do the same.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It was 45 years ago today... 11 Jun 2012
By Runmentionable TOP 1000 REVIEWER
Format:Paperback
"Dangerous Visions" is the Sgt Pepper of science fiction - the most famous symbol of the achievement and ambition of its artform in the 1960s (to the extent it even came out around the same time). And like Sgt Pepper, it's not necessarily the best work in that particular artform in the 1960s, but no-one's arguing about landmark status.

Ellison's intention was to create the first wholly original SF anthology, and one which, by dropping the censorship restrictions of the magazine market, would show the maturity and daring in both form and content which the genre had achieved by the mid-sixties. This was partly done because it was a good idea, and partly as a thumbed nose to the serious literary world, which then as now had a rather disdainful view of genre fiction. The full story is told in Ellison's introduction, which also explains why it all ended up being way, way bigger than anyone had originally expected.

That's partly because it's not just full of stories. Ellison's copious editorial material, the afterwords to each story by the authors, not one but two why-the-hell-not prefaces from Isaac Asimov (and Ellison's response), and the excellent illustrations all add to the book's length. They also create its rollicking, carnivalesque feel and uniquely sixties sense of optimism. For a book that prides itself on "danger", it's a remarkably upbeat read.

The stories themselves vary widely in style, content and quality: there are no stinkers, a few classics, several award-winners and a few that don't stay in your memory. Some, inevitably, have dated a bit, but not as many or as much as you might think.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great to see this re-issued. 19 Sep 2012
Format:Paperback
I originally bought this superb anthology when it was originally released (in two volumes) during the early 1970's.
I treasured it and re-read it many times and so I was delighted to see a one volume re-issue here on Amazon.
The contents are;

FOREWORD: YEAR 2002

by Michael Moorcock
Introduction to
EVENSONG:

EVENSONG

by Lester del Rey
Introduction to
FLIES:

FLIES

by Robert Silverberg
Introduction to
THE DAY AFTER THE DAY THE MARTIANS CAME:

THE DAY AFTER THE DAY THE MARTIANS CAME

by Frederik Pohl
Introduction to
RIDERS OF THE PURPLE WAGE:

RIDERS OF THE PURPLE WAGE
or The Great Gavage

by Philip José Farmer
Introduction to
THE MALLEY SYSTEM:

THE MALLEY SYSTEM

by Miriam Allen deFord
Introduction to
A TOY FOR JULIETTE:

A TOY FOR JULIETTE

by Robert Bloch
Introduction to
THE PROWLER IN THE CITY AT THE EDGE OF THE WORLD:

THE PROWLER IN THE CITY AT THE EDGE OF THE WORLD

by Harlan Ellison
Introduction to
THE NIGHT THAT ALL TIME BROKE OUT:

THE NIGHT THAT ALL TIME BROKE OUT

by Brian W. Aldiss
Introduction to
THE MAN WHO WENT TO THE MOON--TWICE:

THE MAN WHO WENT TO THE MOON--TWICE

by Howard Rodman
Introduction to
FAITH OF OUR FATHERS:

FAITH OF OUR FATHERS

by Philip K.
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars THE classic anthology, with new forewords
This review is of the Kindle SFMasterworks edition.

Anyone who reads SF has heard of this anthology. Read more
Published 2 months ago by Chris Worth
4.0 out of 5 stars Hair Down
Harlan Ellison collected these thirty-two stories to familiarize readers with the "new" voice in 1960's science fiction which broke taboos, flouted conventions, and challenged... Read more
Published 7 months ago by John M. Ford
4.0 out of 5 stars tremendous collection
Ground breaking short stories from the mid 60s group of new wave speculative fiction writers. A must read for all fans of the genre.
Published 9 months ago by Ruth Wilkinson
3.0 out of 5 stars Too Self Indulgent, Mr Ellison!
Prepared by the editor with the intention of making Science Fiction (SF - NOT Sci Fi) intellectually on a par with any other form of classical literature, which it is anyway, the... Read more
Published 13 months ago by l powell
5.0 out of 5 stars Blast from the past
I originally bought this book when it was first published in 1967, back when many of these stories were actually considered dangerous - dealing with such "controversial" subjects... Read more
Published 13 months ago by Steve Gardiner
5.0 out of 5 stars Refresh your memory
Ellison presents a skilful selection of short stories by authors who should be brought to the notice of another generation of readers. Read more
Published 13 months ago by M Poole
1.0 out of 5 stars pretentious
The worst SF story collection I have ever read. I tried every story but it was like wading through porridge. Read more
Published 14 months ago by meryon
4.0 out of 5 stars Introductions to introductions
The short stories themselves are of course excellent, but I am less than keen on the large number of mutual back-slapping introductions which add considerably to the weight of the... Read more
Published 16 months ago by RichardAlibon
2.0 out of 5 stars Not so dangerous.
Okay, so there's a few good stories in here, but after reading an intro which is nothing more than pages of drivel explaining the trials and tribulations of compiling and editing... Read more
Published 23 months ago by R. Harkness
3.0 out of 5 stars Of its time
A generous and eclectic selection from a mixture of well remembered and now forgotten authors. As you might expect the stories which seemed most groundbreaking and zeitgeisty when... Read more
Published on 11 July 2012 by Dudleian
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