FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books.
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Dancing in the Streets: A... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Like New | Details
Sold by Wordery
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: This fine as new copy is waiting for you in our UK warehouse and should be with you within 4-5 working days via Royal Mail.
Trade in your item
Get a £0.50
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Dancing in the Streets: A History of Collective Joy Paperback – 5 May 2008


See all 10 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£8.99
£3.99 £4.47
£8.99 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books. Only 4 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Dancing in the Streets: A History of Collective Joy + Keeping Together in Time: Dance and Drill in Human History
Price For Both: £22.63

Buy the selected items together


Trade In this Item for up to £0.50
Trade in Dancing in the Streets: A History of Collective Joy for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £0.50, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Granta Books (5 May 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1847080081
  • ISBN-13: 978-1847080080
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 2.3 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 211,157 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

[A] thought provoking and sober look at a delightfully unsober topic.
-- London Review of Books

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
6
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 8 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By S Wood TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 2 Mar. 2010
Format: Paperback
Starting back at the dawn of time and bringing the reader up to the present, Barbara Ehrenreich charts the history of collective joy in her recently published book "Dancing in the Streets". The book itself isn't one that's easy to pigeon-hole, in part a work of synthesis, it brings into close focus those fragments of information we have from the past that relate to her subject matter. It also reflects, and speculates on, the expressions of collective joy and ecstatic rituals which are broadly defined as festivals, carnivals, holidays and fairs in which the participants actually participate, as opposed to spectacles of where one just gawps and which reached their hellish epitome with the Nazi rallies of the 1930's.

The earlier section of the book which deal with the pre-historic times are necessarily speculative, one activity that appears frequently in cave paintings would appear to be groups of early men and women dancing. Moving onto the ancient world of the Greeks and Romans Ehrenreich has a greater amount of evidence available and looks at the differences between Roman and Greek (and others) attitudes to collective joy. Her reading of Euripides Bacchae reveals an early example of the tension between the rulers and the ruled with regard to over exuberant festivities. In this case the King is torn to pieces during the annual festival in the Greek world where women ran riot, danced, hunted animals with their bare hands and ate them raw. The King was mistaken for a lion.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Dancing Bob on 13 Oct. 2008
Format: Paperback
As someone interested in sociology, and ecstatic dance, I found this very interesting indeed. The writing style is easy to read, although it seems well-researched too. However, the emphasis is on the 'history', and there is nothing about present-day ecstatic dance practices. No mention of the rave movement even - didn't it impact the USA at all? No mention at all of the existence of current trance dance or circle dance culture - or was that dismissed with the reference to 'doped-up hippies'? Perhaps this is because the book focusses on the mainstream, so instead we get a chapter on the 'Carnivalization of Sport', as the author suggests that this is the new cultural expression for communal feeling. She's probably right ... her arguments are convincing that jumping up and down and shouting and singing at football matches is the re-emergent expression of Dionysian desires. I guess a lot of the ancient 'dancing' wasn't much different, really.

This review sounds quite critical, but I do recommend the book.

Little things you say and do
Make them quite afraid of you
Dance is a crazy feelin'
Now you know it's got them reelin'
When you dance then they fear you, rave on
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Angus Bell on 16 May 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is an interesting take on the rise of misery in western culture - the thesis being that it has been the gradual suppression of all outlets to communal celebration that has led to xs individualism and great misery.
The descriptions of the changes in church culture and the place of organised religion as part of communal ecstacy is interesting as is the parallels with older pagan customs and modern night club culture.
A good read but the well researched but simple idea runs out of steam a bit at the end and depression has many more sociocultural roots than the lack of communal ecstacy - eg the breakdown of the family and the increasing divide between rich and poor
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By William Cohen VINE VOICE on 13 Jan. 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have always been drawn to the thrill of communitas or collective effervescence. Although I had never been able to articulate exactly what I was in pursuit of. For over two years I have been salsa dancing, and I love the warm-up and the group dancing. I had felt guilty about it, because, the only analogy I could make was with a Nuremberg rally. The ecstasy of losing myself as a rippling multi-legged beast seemed illicit and dangerous.

Ehrenreich puts the feeling into context. Collective joy has a great tradition, until the politicians and the clergy got involved and declared the pastime sinful and corrupting. I can now understand why dance brings me so much satisfaction. I renounced politics and the church for dance, and I'm delighted that Ehrenreich would thoroughly approve of my choices. In fact, judging what it says in the book, God probably would, too.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback