Dana Fuchs

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At a Glance

Nationality: American
Born: Jan 10 1976


Biography

Hailed as the new Janis Joplin, even before she played the legendary rock icon in an off- Broadway musical, Dana Fuchs is a raspyvoiced blues-rock singer/songwriter whose versatile career has embraced music, theater, and film. Born in New Jersey in 1976, she later moved to the small rural town of Wildwood, Florida with her musically oriented family, where, at age 12, she began singing in the First Baptist Gospel Choir. Inspired by her parents'
Ray Charles and Hank Williams record collection, she moved to New York to sing the blues after leaving high school, where she teamed up with Jon ... Read more

Hailed as the new Janis Joplin, even before she played the legendary rock icon in an off- Broadway musical, Dana Fuchs is a raspyvoiced blues-rock singer/songwriter whose versatile career has embraced music, theater, and film. Born in New Jersey in 1976, she later moved to the small rural town of Wildwood, Florida with her musically oriented family, where, at age 12, she began singing in the First Baptist Gospel Choir. Inspired by her parents'
Ray Charles and Hank Williams record collection, she moved to New York to sing the blues after leaving high school, where she teamed up with Jon Diamond, a seasoned guitarist who had previously performed with Joan Osborne. Together, they formed the Dana Fuchs Band, which built up a reputation as one of the best live acts on the city's blues circuit,
leading to Fuchs landing the lead role in the Eric Nederlander production of Randall Myler's Janis Joplin musical, Love, Janis. In 2003, they released their first album, Lonely for a Lifetime, through Antler King Records, but Fuchs put the band on the back burner in order to concentrate on other commitments. She starred as Sadie in Julie Taymor's Beatlesbased musical romantic drama Across The Universe, delivering two memorable solos ("Helter Skelter" and "Why Don't We Do It in the Road"), made a brief cameo in the
ensemble piece New York, I Love You, and wrote and performed on the soundtrack to the Maggie Gyllenhaal movie Sherrybaby. After 2008's Live in NYC, recorded at B.B. King's,
she toured with Ray Davies and Dickey Betts before releasing her second studio album,
Love to Beg, via Ruf Records in 2011. The world awaits the Ruf Records release of her
third studio album Bliss Avenue this July.

* * * * *
There are some of us born with an insatiable inquisitiveness about the world beyond our doors. Such is the story of Dana Fuchs. A vagabond soul weaned on “Mama Music” in the black Baptist churches on the “wrong” side of the tracks in her small Florida Panhandle hometown. Fuchs soon outgrew small town living and realized a life in music was all she wanted. At 19 she hitchhiked North with one beat up suitcase and $460 in the pocket of her jeans.

“I arrived in Fort Lee, NJ, as close to New York City as I could get,” she recalls, “and took a job in a sandwich shop working 50+ hours a week and on off days taking a bus into the city to hear music. In about a year, I saved enough money to move to the Lower East Side.”

“Around the corner from my new pad was a blues club,” she continues, “and one night I was lured in by the most woeful, powerful guitar playing I’d ever heard. On stage was my soon-to-be best friend, music partner and co-writer, Jon Diamond.”

“Within a year we were playing the NYC scene with a vengeance and selling out all the popular blues clubs. I was also battling some serious demons, some I brought from home and some I inherited along the way, and they led me down a long, dark path as I struggled to keep the music going.”

One fateful day around this time, Dana received a call with news that her older sister Donna had taken her own life.

“My sister went up North long before I did to live the very dream I’m finally living. After her death, I knew I had no choice but to get help and take the music to the next level – a spiritual one – and I don’t mean religion!”

The universe agreed. Soon thereafter, Dana was awarded the role of a lifetime, playing Janis Joplin every night off Broadway in the play, “Love, Janis.” “I‘ve always drawn comparisons to Janis,” Dana recounts, “but I’d never studied or listened to her before this
play.” She continues, “Only by doing this role did I learn how otherworldly her talent was. I also learned that we had exactly the same influences, as by now, I had been immersing myself in all the great singers, Mavis Staples, Otis Redding, Etta James, Esther
Philips, and on and on…”

“By then, I was singing everyday and night, either playing Janis Joplin in the theater, or doing my thing in the nearby clubs. This really shaped me as a singer and performer and now I was ready to hit the road!”

As fate would have it, Dana was contacted out of the blue by director Julie Taymor. Julie had seen Dana perform in the West Village and she had an idea to write a leading role for Dana in her film “Across The Universe.”

“Rehearsing, recording the soundtrack and filming “Across The Universe” became one of the most extraordinary 18 months of my life.” Dana recalls. “Meeting and working with two of my favorite singers in the world, Bono & Joe Cocker, was a dream I kept thinking I’d awaken from.” She continues, “It wasn’t until June 2011, when I shared the stage with Joe Cocker in Bonn, Germany that I knew it was all way too real!”

On the heels of the her critically acclaimed sophomore album, “Love To Beg” on Ruf Records, Dana is poised to release her next offering, due out in June 2013, again on Ruf Records, entitled “Bliss Avenue.”

“Bliss Avenue” marks an inflection point in the evolution of Dana Fuchs as an artist. It’s not a direction change but is it perhaps a reinvestment of sorts in her musical and human roots. In her own words, Dana describes, “Beginning with the album title and title track “Bliss Avenue,” this record is a collection of songs based on the human condition of suffering as we are all struggling to find a bit of peace and our own little slice of happiness. However, we often try to find this relief in temporary fixes, like too much alcohol, drugs, food, attachment to other people, religious ideologies, addiction to technology and so on. None of these things from their own side are “bad” per se but when we believe they are a true source of happiness then we end up quite disappointed, to say the least and at times downright depressed or mentally ill. Hence the songs, “Living On Sunday,” & “Bliss Avenue,” “Rodents In The Attic,” “Handful Too Many,” How Did Things Get This Way,” “Keep on Walkin’,” actually pretty much every damn song on the CD!”

Perhaps a distinction from “Love To Beg” which was a kind of musical mosaic, “Bliss Avenue” charges forward, lyrically determined to assemble tales of lives loaded with suffering but always with a hand on the relief valve at all times. Dana offers some perspective on where these stories came from and why the new album seems different, maybe more mature, than her past work. “I suppose the growth of my writing started with canceling a tour for the first time in my life to be at my dying brother’s bedside and holding his hand as he passed away. That’s what the song, “So Hard To Move” is about. Every song is about the experience of finding peace when you realize there is nothing externally that can bring you joy OR grief. For my brother, who was a tortured soul, it was not until he fell asleep for good that peace seemed to come. It’s really all in the mind. We have the power to change our entire world simply by changing our perception of it. Much easier said then done, but we won’t usually get there until we’ve exhausted all possibilities and learned for ourselves that comfort through escape using external means, as mentioned above, is not only fleeting, but almost always damaging.

Also a point of departure for Dana was hand-picking top musicians to support her on “Bliss Avenue.” Dana explains, “I realized that you have to hire the best musicians (who are also experienced in the studio) to help you reach your vision. It’s such a collaborative effort. I’ve had many great players on all my CDs, but this time I went with studio veterans and it really added so much. The line up is: Shawn Pelton on drums, Jack Daley on bass, Glenn Patscha on keys, of course Jon Diamond playing his ass off on guitar, and we
added Tabitha Fair and Nicki Richards on background vocals, plus we have Tim Hatfield engineering and co-producing with me and Jon.”

“Bliss Avenue” is certainly a pinnacle for Dana Fuchs and it’s also the album where she admits she’s happy and feels more than ever that it must be heard! She says, “I’m excited for people, especially those fans who have stuck so close with me, to hear “Bliss
Avenue,” because I really purged my soul in a starker more naked way, both lyrically and musically. I got so emotional (to the point of tears) singing several of these tunes that are so close to home like, “So Hard to Move,” “Bliss Avenue,” Long, Long Game,” & “Vagabond Wind.” She continues, “I want this album to reach people in a way that’s meant to be inclusive. Not like, ‘here’s MY world and MY story,’ but rather, ‘here’s my story, can you relate?’” Dana Fuchs is brimming with gratitude, eager to carry forth her Humanist message of unity and connection to audiences that is the hallmark of her live shows. Dana erupts, “I’m so raring to go for this tour! I’m ready to connect to every soul out there who wants to come on board! I’m ready to spill my guts and my sweat on them and cover myself in their guts and sweat! As always, I will give all my heart and soul to every show and hope the audience will continue to give me theirs.“

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

Hailed as the new Janis Joplin, even before she played the legendary rock icon in an off- Broadway musical, Dana Fuchs is a raspyvoiced blues-rock singer/songwriter whose versatile career has embraced music, theater, and film. Born in New Jersey in 1976, she later moved to the small rural town of Wildwood, Florida with her musically oriented family, where, at age 12, she began singing in the First Baptist Gospel Choir. Inspired by her parents'
Ray Charles and Hank Williams record collection, she moved to New York to sing the blues after leaving high school, where she teamed up with Jon Diamond, a seasoned guitarist who had previously performed with Joan Osborne. Together, they formed the Dana Fuchs Band, which built up a reputation as one of the best live acts on the city's blues circuit,
leading to Fuchs landing the lead role in the Eric Nederlander production of Randall Myler's Janis Joplin musical, Love, Janis. In 2003, they released their first album, Lonely for a Lifetime, through Antler King Records, but Fuchs put the band on the back burner in order to concentrate on other commitments. She starred as Sadie in Julie Taymor's Beatlesbased musical romantic drama Across The Universe, delivering two memorable solos ("Helter Skelter" and "Why Don't We Do It in the Road"), made a brief cameo in the
ensemble piece New York, I Love You, and wrote and performed on the soundtrack to the Maggie Gyllenhaal movie Sherrybaby. After 2008's Live in NYC, recorded at B.B. King's,
she toured with Ray Davies and Dickey Betts before releasing her second studio album,
Love to Beg, via Ruf Records in 2011. The world awaits the Ruf Records release of her
third studio album Bliss Avenue this July.

* * * * *
There are some of us born with an insatiable inquisitiveness about the world beyond our doors. Such is the story of Dana Fuchs. A vagabond soul weaned on “Mama Music” in the black Baptist churches on the “wrong” side of the tracks in her small Florida Panhandle hometown. Fuchs soon outgrew small town living and realized a life in music was all she wanted. At 19 she hitchhiked North with one beat up suitcase and $460 in the pocket of her jeans.

“I arrived in Fort Lee, NJ, as close to New York City as I could get,” she recalls, “and took a job in a sandwich shop working 50+ hours a week and on off days taking a bus into the city to hear music. In about a year, I saved enough money to move to the Lower East Side.”

“Around the corner from my new pad was a blues club,” she continues, “and one night I was lured in by the most woeful, powerful guitar playing I’d ever heard. On stage was my soon-to-be best friend, music partner and co-writer, Jon Diamond.”

“Within a year we were playing the NYC scene with a vengeance and selling out all the popular blues clubs. I was also battling some serious demons, some I brought from home and some I inherited along the way, and they led me down a long, dark path as I struggled to keep the music going.”

One fateful day around this time, Dana received a call with news that her older sister Donna had taken her own life.

“My sister went up North long before I did to live the very dream I’m finally living. After her death, I knew I had no choice but to get help and take the music to the next level – a spiritual one – and I don’t mean religion!”

The universe agreed. Soon thereafter, Dana was awarded the role of a lifetime, playing Janis Joplin every night off Broadway in the play, “Love, Janis.” “I‘ve always drawn comparisons to Janis,” Dana recounts, “but I’d never studied or listened to her before this
play.” She continues, “Only by doing this role did I learn how otherworldly her talent was. I also learned that we had exactly the same influences, as by now, I had been immersing myself in all the great singers, Mavis Staples, Otis Redding, Etta James, Esther
Philips, and on and on…”

“By then, I was singing everyday and night, either playing Janis Joplin in the theater, or doing my thing in the nearby clubs. This really shaped me as a singer and performer and now I was ready to hit the road!”

As fate would have it, Dana was contacted out of the blue by director Julie Taymor. Julie had seen Dana perform in the West Village and she had an idea to write a leading role for Dana in her film “Across The Universe.”

“Rehearsing, recording the soundtrack and filming “Across The Universe” became one of the most extraordinary 18 months of my life.” Dana recalls. “Meeting and working with two of my favorite singers in the world, Bono & Joe Cocker, was a dream I kept thinking I’d awaken from.” She continues, “It wasn’t until June 2011, when I shared the stage with Joe Cocker in Bonn, Germany that I knew it was all way too real!”

On the heels of the her critically acclaimed sophomore album, “Love To Beg” on Ruf Records, Dana is poised to release her next offering, due out in June 2013, again on Ruf Records, entitled “Bliss Avenue.”

“Bliss Avenue” marks an inflection point in the evolution of Dana Fuchs as an artist. It’s not a direction change but is it perhaps a reinvestment of sorts in her musical and human roots. In her own words, Dana describes, “Beginning with the album title and title track “Bliss Avenue,” this record is a collection of songs based on the human condition of suffering as we are all struggling to find a bit of peace and our own little slice of happiness. However, we often try to find this relief in temporary fixes, like too much alcohol, drugs, food, attachment to other people, religious ideologies, addiction to technology and so on. None of these things from their own side are “bad” per se but when we believe they are a true source of happiness then we end up quite disappointed, to say the least and at times downright depressed or mentally ill. Hence the songs, “Living On Sunday,” & “Bliss Avenue,” “Rodents In The Attic,” “Handful Too Many,” How Did Things Get This Way,” “Keep on Walkin’,” actually pretty much every damn song on the CD!”

Perhaps a distinction from “Love To Beg” which was a kind of musical mosaic, “Bliss Avenue” charges forward, lyrically determined to assemble tales of lives loaded with suffering but always with a hand on the relief valve at all times. Dana offers some perspective on where these stories came from and why the new album seems different, maybe more mature, than her past work. “I suppose the growth of my writing started with canceling a tour for the first time in my life to be at my dying brother’s bedside and holding his hand as he passed away. That’s what the song, “So Hard To Move” is about. Every song is about the experience of finding peace when you realize there is nothing externally that can bring you joy OR grief. For my brother, who was a tortured soul, it was not until he fell asleep for good that peace seemed to come. It’s really all in the mind. We have the power to change our entire world simply by changing our perception of it. Much easier said then done, but we won’t usually get there until we’ve exhausted all possibilities and learned for ourselves that comfort through escape using external means, as mentioned above, is not only fleeting, but almost always damaging.

Also a point of departure for Dana was hand-picking top musicians to support her on “Bliss Avenue.” Dana explains, “I realized that you have to hire the best musicians (who are also experienced in the studio) to help you reach your vision. It’s such a collaborative effort. I’ve had many great players on all my CDs, but this time I went with studio veterans and it really added so much. The line up is: Shawn Pelton on drums, Jack Daley on bass, Glenn Patscha on keys, of course Jon Diamond playing his ass off on guitar, and we
added Tabitha Fair and Nicki Richards on background vocals, plus we have Tim Hatfield engineering and co-producing with me and Jon.”

“Bliss Avenue” is certainly a pinnacle for Dana Fuchs and it’s also the album where she admits she’s happy and feels more than ever that it must be heard! She says, “I’m excited for people, especially those fans who have stuck so close with me, to hear “Bliss
Avenue,” because I really purged my soul in a starker more naked way, both lyrically and musically. I got so emotional (to the point of tears) singing several of these tunes that are so close to home like, “So Hard to Move,” “Bliss Avenue,” Long, Long Game,” & “Vagabond Wind.” She continues, “I want this album to reach people in a way that’s meant to be inclusive. Not like, ‘here’s MY world and MY story,’ but rather, ‘here’s my story, can you relate?’” Dana Fuchs is brimming with gratitude, eager to carry forth her Humanist message of unity and connection to audiences that is the hallmark of her live shows. Dana erupts, “I’m so raring to go for this tour! I’m ready to connect to every soul out there who wants to come on board! I’m ready to spill my guts and my sweat on them and cover myself in their guts and sweat! As always, I will give all my heart and soul to every show and hope the audience will continue to give me theirs.“

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

Hailed as the new Janis Joplin, even before she played the legendary rock icon in an off- Broadway musical, Dana Fuchs is a raspyvoiced blues-rock singer/songwriter whose versatile career has embraced music, theater, and film. Born in New Jersey in 1976, she later moved to the small rural town of Wildwood, Florida with her musically oriented family, where, at age 12, she began singing in the First Baptist Gospel Choir. Inspired by her parents'
Ray Charles and Hank Williams record collection, she moved to New York to sing the blues after leaving high school, where she teamed up with Jon Diamond, a seasoned guitarist who had previously performed with Joan Osborne. Together, they formed the Dana Fuchs Band, which built up a reputation as one of the best live acts on the city's blues circuit,
leading to Fuchs landing the lead role in the Eric Nederlander production of Randall Myler's Janis Joplin musical, Love, Janis. In 2003, they released their first album, Lonely for a Lifetime, through Antler King Records, but Fuchs put the band on the back burner in order to concentrate on other commitments. She starred as Sadie in Julie Taymor's Beatlesbased musical romantic drama Across The Universe, delivering two memorable solos ("Helter Skelter" and "Why Don't We Do It in the Road"), made a brief cameo in the
ensemble piece New York, I Love You, and wrote and performed on the soundtrack to the Maggie Gyllenhaal movie Sherrybaby. After 2008's Live in NYC, recorded at B.B. King's,
she toured with Ray Davies and Dickey Betts before releasing her second studio album,
Love to Beg, via Ruf Records in 2011. The world awaits the Ruf Records release of her
third studio album Bliss Avenue this July.

* * * * *
There are some of us born with an insatiable inquisitiveness about the world beyond our doors. Such is the story of Dana Fuchs. A vagabond soul weaned on “Mama Music” in the black Baptist churches on the “wrong” side of the tracks in her small Florida Panhandle hometown. Fuchs soon outgrew small town living and realized a life in music was all she wanted. At 19 she hitchhiked North with one beat up suitcase and $460 in the pocket of her jeans.

“I arrived in Fort Lee, NJ, as close to New York City as I could get,” she recalls, “and took a job in a sandwich shop working 50+ hours a week and on off days taking a bus into the city to hear music. In about a year, I saved enough money to move to the Lower East Side.”

“Around the corner from my new pad was a blues club,” she continues, “and one night I was lured in by the most woeful, powerful guitar playing I’d ever heard. On stage was my soon-to-be best friend, music partner and co-writer, Jon Diamond.”

“Within a year we were playing the NYC scene with a vengeance and selling out all the popular blues clubs. I was also battling some serious demons, some I brought from home and some I inherited along the way, and they led me down a long, dark path as I struggled to keep the music going.”

One fateful day around this time, Dana received a call with news that her older sister Donna had taken her own life.

“My sister went up North long before I did to live the very dream I’m finally living. After her death, I knew I had no choice but to get help and take the music to the next level – a spiritual one – and I don’t mean religion!”

The universe agreed. Soon thereafter, Dana was awarded the role of a lifetime, playing Janis Joplin every night off Broadway in the play, “Love, Janis.” “I‘ve always drawn comparisons to Janis,” Dana recounts, “but I’d never studied or listened to her before this
play.” She continues, “Only by doing this role did I learn how otherworldly her talent was. I also learned that we had exactly the same influences, as by now, I had been immersing myself in all the great singers, Mavis Staples, Otis Redding, Etta James, Esther
Philips, and on and on…”

“By then, I was singing everyday and night, either playing Janis Joplin in the theater, or doing my thing in the nearby clubs. This really shaped me as a singer and performer and now I was ready to hit the road!”

As fate would have it, Dana was contacted out of the blue by director Julie Taymor. Julie had seen Dana perform in the West Village and she had an idea to write a leading role for Dana in her film “Across The Universe.”

“Rehearsing, recording the soundtrack and filming “Across The Universe” became one of the most extraordinary 18 months of my life.” Dana recalls. “Meeting and working with two of my favorite singers in the world, Bono & Joe Cocker, was a dream I kept thinking I’d awaken from.” She continues, “It wasn’t until June 2011, when I shared the stage with Joe Cocker in Bonn, Germany that I knew it was all way too real!”

On the heels of the her critically acclaimed sophomore album, “Love To Beg” on Ruf Records, Dana is poised to release her next offering, due out in June 2013, again on Ruf Records, entitled “Bliss Avenue.”

“Bliss Avenue” marks an inflection point in the evolution of Dana Fuchs as an artist. It’s not a direction change but is it perhaps a reinvestment of sorts in her musical and human roots. In her own words, Dana describes, “Beginning with the album title and title track “Bliss Avenue,” this record is a collection of songs based on the human condition of suffering as we are all struggling to find a bit of peace and our own little slice of happiness. However, we often try to find this relief in temporary fixes, like too much alcohol, drugs, food, attachment to other people, religious ideologies, addiction to technology and so on. None of these things from their own side are “bad” per se but when we believe they are a true source of happiness then we end up quite disappointed, to say the least and at times downright depressed or mentally ill. Hence the songs, “Living On Sunday,” & “Bliss Avenue,” “Rodents In The Attic,” “Handful Too Many,” How Did Things Get This Way,” “Keep on Walkin’,” actually pretty much every damn song on the CD!”

Perhaps a distinction from “Love To Beg” which was a kind of musical mosaic, “Bliss Avenue” charges forward, lyrically determined to assemble tales of lives loaded with suffering but always with a hand on the relief valve at all times. Dana offers some perspective on where these stories came from and why the new album seems different, maybe more mature, than her past work. “I suppose the growth of my writing started with canceling a tour for the first time in my life to be at my dying brother’s bedside and holding his hand as he passed away. That’s what the song, “So Hard To Move” is about. Every song is about the experience of finding peace when you realize there is nothing externally that can bring you joy OR grief. For my brother, who was a tortured soul, it was not until he fell asleep for good that peace seemed to come. It’s really all in the mind. We have the power to change our entire world simply by changing our perception of it. Much easier said then done, but we won’t usually get there until we’ve exhausted all possibilities and learned for ourselves that comfort through escape using external means, as mentioned above, is not only fleeting, but almost always damaging.

Also a point of departure for Dana was hand-picking top musicians to support her on “Bliss Avenue.” Dana explains, “I realized that you have to hire the best musicians (who are also experienced in the studio) to help you reach your vision. It’s such a collaborative effort. I’ve had many great players on all my CDs, but this time I went with studio veterans and it really added so much. The line up is: Shawn Pelton on drums, Jack Daley on bass, Glenn Patscha on keys, of course Jon Diamond playing his ass off on guitar, and we
added Tabitha Fair and Nicki Richards on background vocals, plus we have Tim Hatfield engineering and co-producing with me and Jon.”

“Bliss Avenue” is certainly a pinnacle for Dana Fuchs and it’s also the album where she admits she’s happy and feels more than ever that it must be heard! She says, “I’m excited for people, especially those fans who have stuck so close with me, to hear “Bliss
Avenue,” because I really purged my soul in a starker more naked way, both lyrically and musically. I got so emotional (to the point of tears) singing several of these tunes that are so close to home like, “So Hard to Move,” “Bliss Avenue,” Long, Long Game,” & “Vagabond Wind.” She continues, “I want this album to reach people in a way that’s meant to be inclusive. Not like, ‘here’s MY world and MY story,’ but rather, ‘here’s my story, can you relate?’” Dana Fuchs is brimming with gratitude, eager to carry forth her Humanist message of unity and connection to audiences that is the hallmark of her live shows. Dana erupts, “I’m so raring to go for this tour! I’m ready to connect to every soul out there who wants to come on board! I’m ready to spill my guts and my sweat on them and cover myself in their guts and sweat! As always, I will give all my heart and soul to every show and hope the audience will continue to give me theirs.“

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

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