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Daemon Mass Market Paperback – 29 Dec 2009


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Product details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 632 pages
  • Publisher: Signet Book; Reprint edition (29 Dec 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0451228731
  • ISBN-13: 978-0451228734
  • Product Dimensions: 11.4 x 3.5 x 19.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (98 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,711,970 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

DANIEL SUAREZ is the author of the New York Times bestseller Daemon, Freedom (TM), Kill Decision, and Influx. A former systems consultant to Fortune 1000 companies, he has designed and developed software for the defense, finance, and entertainment industries. With a lifelong interest in both IT systems and creative writing, his high-tech and sci-fi thrillers focus on technology-driven change. Suarez is a past speaker at TED Global, MIT Media Lab, NASA Ames, the Long Now Foundation, and the headquarters of Google, Microsoft, and Amazon -- among many others. Self-taught in software development, he is a graduate from the University of Delaware with a BA in English Literature. An avid PC and console gamer, his own world-building skills were bolstered through years as a pen & paper role-playing game moderator. He lives in Los Angeles, California. -- For more information and engagement, please visit: www.daniel-suarez.com -- social: https://plus.google.com/+DanielSuarez/posts

Amazon Q&A:
http://www.omnivoracious.com/2014/02/amazon-asks-daniel-suarez-author-of-influx.html

Product Description

Review

Suarez's riveting debut would be a perfect gift for a favorite computer geek or anyone who appreciates thrills, chills and cyber suspense - Publishers Weekly (starred review).



Greatest. Techno-thriller. Period. Suarez presents a fascinating account of autonomous, logic-based terrorism, incorporating current and anticipated technologies to create a credible and quite clever story. Experts have long feared the Internet doomsday scenario; the Daemon is arguably more terrifying - Billy O'Brien, Director of Cybersecurity and Communications Policy, The White House.



Suarez is the best author of tech fiction since Bruce Sterling and Neal Stephenson - John Robb, author of Brave New War.



Daemon is the real deal - a scary look at what can go wrong as we depend increasingly on computer networks - Craig Newmark, founder of craigslist.



Daemon is better than early Tom Clancy … the tech is invoked with inside knowledge; the writing is better; and deeper issues are explored with greater imagination - Stewart Brand, founder of the Whole Earth Catalog and cofounder of The Long Now Foundation.



Damon is to novels what The Matrix was to movies. It will be how other novels that rely on technology will be judged - Rick Klau, Strategic Partner Development, Google.

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Back Cover

Computer genius Matthew Sobol is dead, but his final creation lives on. An infernal web of autonomous computer programs, Sobol's Daemon feasts on the lifeblood of our hyper-connected society: information. Gathering secrets and stealing identities, it soon has the power to change lives as well as the power to take them. Those who serve the Daemon are rewarded; those who defy it are eliminated. Recruiting acolytes from the dispossessed and disaffected, the Daemon grows stronger with each passing day. We face a start choice: confront a faceless, formless monster or learn to live in a world in which we are no longer in control.

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on 29 Feb 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book is good 80% of the way through. The tech aspect of the book is spot on except for the fps gaming section. It's a really good until the last chapter, it feels like you missed a bit and then it just ends, leaving everything unanswered. Very disappointing end.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Steampunk TOP 500 REVIEWER on 10 April 2009
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
(No Spoilers)

I really wanted to like this book, as it's the kind of story I normally love: Hard-edged, convincing geeky-tech stuff. When it comes to technology, it's clear the writer really knows what he's talking about. In fact, this is sometimes a problem, and the occasional (long) technical descriptions may knock a lot of readers right out of the story.

However, while the writer has a good grip on information technology, it soon becomes painfully clear that this is a first novel, complete with a lot of common first novel flaws.

For me, the biggest problems were with the pacing of the story. A couple of times you turn the page and read something like "Six Months Later".

There are also a lot of places where pruning would have made the story stronger - for example, one wonders what's the point of giving a one-page mini-biography of a character, if their only function in the story is to be killed at the top of the next page.

But worst of all, as the story progresses, it's hard to avoid the feeling that the author has just lost control of where it's going, and things get far-fetched to the point where it's impossible to suspend disbelief any more.

To be honest, if I hadn't been reading this book for review purposes I would have quit somewhere in the last hundred pages.

And when I got the the end... there really wasn't one. The story just (IMO) stopped.

I hate writing a harsh review of this sort of book. I can only hope that Suarez (and his editor!) learns from the experience of writing this one, and that the next will be better.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Sam Tyler on 15 April 2009
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
`Daemon' is a book full of great ideas and poor execution. When a software programming genius dies it seems that his end of his life is only the beginning of his legacy. Before death Matthew Sobel integrated AI into the internet that would trigger on news of his death. This Daemon software interacts with real people found through his own MMORPGs and preys on their greed, working independently these minions act to undermine the super companies that currently dominate the world. It is up to small town Sheriff and a computer genius to destroy the Daemon before it takes over the world.

The idea of an AI controlling big business was a brilliant imo. With today's global markets and a closer connection between state and industry than ever before the use of viruses etc to blackmail a company is becoming increasingly likely. Malware regularly imbeds in people's PCs and goes undiscovered until an anti-virus upgrade some months later. Daniel Suarez has created a book with big ideas, but unfortunately he seems unable to handle them. To start with it appears that `Daemon' will be a thriller, but as the book progresses it becomes increasingly a disaster novel. When the book maintains the smaller aspects of investigation it works, the bigger elements fall flat and feel fanciful.

As the novel progresses the book weakens. The idea of AI controlled SUVs is acceptable, but by the end Suarez takes the idea to a ridiculous level. It became apparent as I rapidly came to the end that there was no conclusion in the book and that it felt like the first of a series. Suarez is too happy to kill off characters and leave the reader with no closure. The last 50 pages in particular were confusing and a little ridiculous. This is a real shame because for the first half I really enjoyed the intense standoff between the alleged AI and the police. The slow and insidious climb of the Daemon is a good read, it's a shame that we never find out who wins in the end.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mr. T. S. James VINE VOICE on 12 April 2009
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I was quite excited to receive this book as I usually love to read tech-thrillers, which is what I would class this book as.

In general the book goes at a good pace and can be a page turner in places. For me it went through stages of wanting to find out what happens next and then it would fall flat for a few chapters and I tended to lose interest. The story is a familiar one, ghost in the machine kinda thing, but seemed to have been refreshed slightly for today's audience.

The book did tend to delve into various character histories, which eventually turned out to be for no reason at all if the character was killed off fairly shortly after. Leaving me wondering what was the point. But on the whole I can't complain. The only let down was the ending, where it was kind of like a bad ending to a film, it just stopped. Normally you would expect a big ending or some big twist to the story line, but I was left disappointed in this instance.

Overall, I can recommend for a light read or if you're into tech-thrillers, but bear in mind that the ending isn't all that if you're expecting something to satisfy.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mr. J W VINE VOICE on 11 April 2009
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I am a bit of a 'techie' so enjoy books of this type. For me, the original classic is 'The Cuckoo's Egg' by Clifford Stoll. In a lot of ways, this is the 'internet enabled' version, updated 20 years after Stoll's. I really enjoyed the concept of the book with a crazy millionaire unleashing a software program that can control lives and corporations despite the death of the creator. I would agree with other comments though, that no single characters really get the space to stand out, and I think the book is worse off for that. The closest is Jon Ross, but he disappears for large periods of time. The final straw to knock this down to 3 stars is the fairly timid ending. I can only assume (and hope, because I would read it) a sequel is in the pipeline.

Overall though worth a read. If you haven't done so though, I would recommend Stoll's book above.
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