Tess of the D'Urbervilles and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more

Buy New

or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
Buy Used
Used - Good See details
Price: 2.78

or
 
   
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Start reading Tess of the D'Urbervilles on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Tess of the D'Urbervilles (Penguin Classics) [Paperback]

Thomas Hardy , Margaret Higonnet
4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (128 customer reviews)
Price: 6.99 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over 10. Details
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Want it tomorrow, 26 July? Choose Express delivery at checkout. Details

Book Description

30 Jan 2003 Penguin Classics

A heartaching portrayal of a woman faced by an impossible choice in the pursuit of happiness, Thomas Hardy's Tess of the D'Urbervilles is edited with notes by Tim Dolin and an introduction by Margaret R. Higonnet in Penguin Classics.

When Tess Durbeyfield is driven by family poverty to claim kinship with the wealthy D'Urbervilles and seek a portion of their family fortune, meeting her 'cousin' Alec proves to be her downfall. A very different man, Angel Clare, seems to offer her love and salvation, but Tess must choose whether to reveal her past or remain silent in the hope of a peaceful future. With its sensitive depiction of the wronged Tess and powerful criticism of social convention, Tess of the D'Urbervilles, subtitled 'A Pure Woman', is one of the most moving and poetic of Hardy's novels.

Based on the three-volume first edition that shocked readers when first published in 1891, this edition includes as appendices: Hardy's Prefaces, the Landscapes of Tess, episodes originally censored from the Graphic periodical version and a selection of the Graphic illustrations.

Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), born Higher Brockhampton, near Dorchester, originally trained as an architect before earning his living as a writer. Though he saw himself primarily as a poet, Hardy was the author of some of the late eighteenth century's major novels: The Mayor of Casterbridge (1886), Tess of the D'Urbervilles (1891), Far from the Madding Crowd (1874), and Jude the Obscure (1895). Amidst the controversy caused by Jude the Obscure, he turned to the poetry he had been writing all his life. In the next thirty years he published over nine hundred poems and his epic drama in verse, The Dynasts.

If you enjoyed Tess of the D'Urbervilles, you might like Daniel Defoe's Moll Flanders, also available in Penguin Classics.

'The greatest tragic writer among the English novelists'

Virginia Woolf


Frequently Bought Together

Tess of the D'Urbervilles (Penguin Classics) + Rapture
Buy the selected items together
  • Rapture 6.99


Product details

  • Paperback: 592 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Classics; Rev Ed edition (30 Jan 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0141439599
  • ISBN-13: 978-0141439594
  • Product Dimensions: 19.9 x 2.6 x 12.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (128 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 19,963 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

""Audie Award winner Simon Vance's reading is straightforward, well paced, and clear."" ---Library Journal Audio Review --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Book Description

OCR-endorsed edition of this popular classic text, for use with the new OCR English GCE specifications --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
On an evening in the latter part of May a middle-aged man was walking homeward from Shaston to the village of Marlott, in the adjoining Vale of Blakemore or Blackmoor. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:


Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
31 of 34 people found the following review helpful
Format:Mass Market Paperback
This is a novel so saturated with emotion it is almost too much just to read it. The plot revolves around the eponymous heroine, Tess Durbeyfield, a young and innocent girl who plunges headfirst into adulthood by giving birth to an illegitimate child. Tess is immediately condemned by a cruel society and her unavoidable fate is dragged out in heart wrenching detail by Hardy. What is most interesting about the novel is the author's obvious love for his character, and it is fascinating to imagine Hardy wishing for a happy ending just like the reader, yet at the same time knowing that he is unable to help Tess, his own creation. Everyone should read this novel, it has romance, murder, tragedy, injustice, intricate social commentary, and an intoxicating melancholia. The character of Tess is so well conceived by Hardy, she appears so realistic that the reader finds themselves weeping tears for her as if she were a loved one. Persevere with Hardy's somewhat lengthy descriptions of the surrounding landscape and you will find this novel to be as beautifully perfect as I did.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
55 of 62 people found the following review helpful
Format:Paperback
I have to give Tess five stars because no book I have read before or since has moved me to such a degree. Thirty years later I still have my original copy, entirely disintegrated, the glue dissolved, in part I'm sure by my hot adolescent tears. It simply tore me apart - I remember in particular strugggling to finish Tess's letter from Flintcomb-Ash through eyes fogged with grief and that after finishing the book I was well-nigh inconsolable for days. I spent the following summer touring the Dorset locations on my bicycle as a kind of pilgrimage, and remember those cruel hills pretty well too.

But having said that, I was sixteen at the time and emotionally wide open. Reading it five years later, I could hardly get past the clumsiness and infelicities in the writing and the crude manipulation and melodrama of the plot. How could I have fallen for this? Reading it again another ten years further on I better understood the theatricality of it - it should be read in some ways like the old ballads with which Hardy was very familiar, with their highly exaggerated representations of good and evil - but the magic had gone.

Maybe the key is that Tess is a book written by an emotional adolescent - Hardy was a writer who arguably never really grew up, and his own relationships seem to bear this out - which speaks most forcefully to other adolescents. The melodrama and the suffering, the torment and the injustice which Tess is put through really are meat and drink to the average sensitive sixteen year old, but seem perhaps a bit foolish in retrospect.

But this isn't really a criticism.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
Tess of the D'Urbevilles, by Thomas Hardy, is a wonderful novel, which tragically and poignantly follows the ill-fated life of its heroine, Tess Durbeyfield. Through his exquisite use of imagery, his reflection of Tess in nature, and the continuing thread of tragedy which he weaves throughout the novel, Hardy is able to present to us one of the most memorable figures in English literature. Despite her sincerity and integrity, Tess is forever destined for disappointment, and Hardy's immensely lucid and descriptive writing allows the reader to appreciate this. I would recommend this tremendous piece of fiction to any readers interested in reading the work of a brilliant Victorian author, or for those who appreciate the paradox of sadness and beauty represented in the figure of a strong protagonist.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Tragic force 8 Mar 1999
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
'Tess' is a tragedy of sheer power - the reader at once becomes a companion to her plight and a friend in her solitude. A powerful emotional bond is created by Hardy; he leaves the reader totally alone at the end of the novel, sparing no emotion. The clarity, at times, is disturbed by the time period and slight linguistic idiosyncrasies, but the story remains completely unscathed: a tale of a young woman, corrupted, ruined, and left with nothing by fate.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
By Nadia
Format:Paperback
I really enjoyed this book. I had previously read The Mayor Of Casterbridge at school (15 years ago) and it has always stayed with me so I thought I would give Tess a try to see if Thomas Hardy could move me with another of his books and he sure did! I love the fact that even though his books were written a long long time ago the subject matter is still applicable today. I could really empathise with Tess, her independance, high morals & sheer stubborness reminds me of me. I could tell that Hardy genuinely cared about Tess to the point where I could easily think she was actually a real person.
I like how Hardy's novels are not happy endings, they are tragic but true to life.
I am going to read Jude of the obscure next and hope it measures up against these two.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
Format:Paperback
I have to give Tess five stars because no other book I have ever read has moved me to such a degree. Thirty years later I still have my original copy, entirely disintegrated, the glue dissolved, very possibly by my hot adolescent tears. It simply tore me apart - I remember in particular struggling to finish Tess's letter from Flintcomb-Ash through eyes blurred with grief, and that after finishing the book I was well-nigh inconsolable for days. I spent the following summer touring the Dorset locations on my bicycle as a kind of pilgrimage, and remember those cruel hills pretty well too.

But having said that, I was sixteen at the time and emotionally wide open. Reading it just five years later, I could hardly get past the clumsiness and infelicities in the writing and the crude manipulation and melodrama of the plot. How could I have fallen for this? Reading it again another ten years further on I better understood the theatricality of it - it should be read in some ways like the old ballads with which Hardy was very familiar, with their highly exaggerated representations of good and evil - but the magic had gone.

Maybe the key is that Tess is a book written by an emotional adolescent - Hardy was a writer who arguably never really grew up, and his own relationships seem to bear this out - which speaks most forcefully to other adolescents. The melodrama and the suffering, the torment and the injustice which Tess is put through really are meat and drink to the average sensitive adolescent, but seem perhaps a bit foolish in retrospect.

But this isn't really a criticism.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Would you like to see more reviews about this item?
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Most Recent Customer Reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars persevere, but no book has captured the essence of romantic love as...
I would give this novel between 4 and 5 stars. Hardy was a poet, but also a writer. This novel therefore explores everything about love, from the intoxicating highs to the brutal... Read more
Published 1 month ago by Creaker
5.0 out of 5 stars Perfection
Arguably my favourite book ever.

It's as dark and as wrenchingly tragic as you'd expect from Thomas Hardy.

The final chapters are unbelievably poignant. Read more
Published 2 months ago by Jonathan
5.0 out of 5 stars A tragedy in love.
Tess of the D'Ubervilles is very much a tale of tragic romance. Having been raped as a young girl by the evil Mr D'Uberville and having given birth to, and buried his illegitimate... Read more
Published 2 months ago by Miss H
5.0 out of 5 stars Great read
I read this book on my Kindle and it gives me so many memories of the first time I read it.
Published 3 months ago by Country Music Fan
5.0 out of 5 stars Great
Bought this for my English course. It was in perfect condition. Perfect for what I needed to use it for.
Published 3 months ago by Kimberley xx
5.0 out of 5 stars Love it
Only a chapter in but it's already great. Plus the book came in really good time and looks perfect, would definitely recommend :)
Published 3 months ago by Asha Carsmith
4.0 out of 5 stars A very good classic tale
An absorbing read and tragic tale. I had seen a dramatization of the story some years ago but had forgotten how it ended so it held my attention throughout. Read more
Published 3 months ago by annag
3.0 out of 5 stars Storyline is fine but without the depth of the book
I read the first 3 first chapters of the book and listened to rest on the CD. I really enjoyed the nice English language in the book and the slow development of the story. Read more
Published 4 months ago by Bert
5.0 out of 5 stars Eff Me O'Reilly
Poor Tess, cruelly raped by one of them nasty D'Urbevilles I don't know what's the world coming to I ask you
Published 4 months ago by PETER MATHER
5.0 out of 5 stars Classic
Of course we all know this is a classic, but I hadn't read it until now. Wow, why did I wait so long. A must read by all.
Published 5 months ago by sailingdudette
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback