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DEEP PURPLE-MACHINE HEAD


Price: £4.07
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Biography

In a world that is constantly changing and where trends and fashions are unforeseeable, Deep Purple are among the few reliable constant factors of music history. For more than 30 years now, they have enriched the spirit of rock music regularly with new albums, fascinating tours, and projects causing quite a stir. Five years after their latest studio album Abandon and three years after the ... Read more in Amazon's Deep Purple Store

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Frequently Bought Together

DEEP PURPLE-MACHINE HEAD + Deep Purple In Rock - Anniversary Edition + Fireball - 25th Anniversary Edition
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Product details

  • Audio CD
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: CD
  • ASIN: B000002KHB
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  DVD Audio  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (90 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 14,989 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

29 of 32 people found the following review helpful By David P TOP 50 REVIEWER on 22 July 2011
Format: Audio CD
... was hearing this for the first time.

I grew up in the 60s/70s with 2 quite older sisters. They were very much in to The Beatles and Elvis, and hence so was I. At school in the mid 70s I was still mad keen on Elvis, and shared my passion with one of my best mates. We were always swapping records and boring other friends rigid with our love and knowledge of Elvis and his music. Then one rainy lunchtime at school, my friend dragged me in to one of the music rooms where there was a record player which a few select pupils were allowed to use so long as they were careful. When we got in there, there were a few other boys from my class, and my mate said to me, "You have just GOT TO HEAR THIS", and then gave a nod.

The needle was carefully cued up over the appropriate track and then gently lowered, and then Smoke On The Water started to wash over us all.

We all know what a stunning track this is, but the effect on me was electrifying and profound. I can still remember that day 37-ish years ago as clearly and vividly as if it were yesterday, quite literally. In my rather sheltered musical exposure up to that moment, I had never heard anything like it before, and I just fell in love with rock, instantly.

Whenever I hear it now, and I hear it a lot, I am transported back to that day that changed my taste in music, and it is no exaggeration to say my life, for ever. I can see all my mates grinning at me, I can smell the rain and my damp blazer, I can hear the gentle hiss and crackle of the vinyl as the track started to play, I can feel the shivers going up my spine.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By D. J. H. Thorn TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 15 Nov 2007
Format: Audio CD
Deep Purple have made several great albums, so there's no absolute consensus on which is their best, but 'Machine Head' gets my vote ahead of 'Made In Japan' and 'In Rock.' The sleek, fast-paced 'Highway Star' and 'Pictures of Home' reveal the band's major qualities. They can do heavy, as on the famous 'Smoke On The Water,' but its the rich quality of musicianship that counts here, allied to their flamboyance. Even the lyrics generally avoid cliches. 'Never Before' wasn't really instant enough to be a hit, but swaggers with class nevertheless. 'Space Truckin'' is the surprise for me, featuring a rawer, basic style, with Ian Gillan barking out the chorus. 'When A Blind Man Cries' is the album's most soulful track, a beautiful way to end the album. Packed with great songs and quality performances, even the album's lesser known tracks are superb. The second disc is interesting enough, but the original album on its own would have been enough. An all-time classic.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By P. G. Harris TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 22 Feb 2008
Format: Audio CD
What is the point of writing a review of an album which already has a place in the elite of all time great hard rock albums?

Well, it's simply this. I've just come back to this album for the third time. Back in the seventies it was the first proper LP I owned, playing both of my vinyl copies to death. In the nineties I bought it on CD. Then, yesterday, wandering around London I played it on my iPod, and was once more struck by the sheer quality.

So thoughts about it. Well Deep Purple are often classified as heavy metal, but this album is just stunningly melodic when compared to what is described as metal today. Also, it seemed to me that Machine Head has more in common with what Pink Floyd were doing around this time than what, say, Sabbath were doing.

Also, the way the Mk2 line up complement each other is just fabulous. Of coure there is the juxtaposition non-pareil of Gillan's voice and Blackmore's guitar, but the rhythm section of Glover and Paice give the whole album a fantastic momentum. Lord's keyboards are almost unique in hard rock.

So down to the tracks themselves. My favourites from my younger days, Highway Star, Pictures of Home and Space Truckin retain their sheer power and are as exciting as ever. Highway Star opening a show must be one of the all time great live moments. But now I find the gentler, blues-ier tracks, Maybe I'm a Leo and Lazy to be the real stand outs. Lazy is probably the best track, even though it feels dangerously like Spinal Tap's experimental jazz period and I guess its not too original to say that Jon Lord must be the prototype for Derek Smalls.

And then we come to THAT TRACK, and THAT RIFF.
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26 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Gavin Wilson on 13 Jun 2006
Format: Audio CD
This is now the fourth version of the album I have bought. As a 13-year-old, I originally bought it on cassette and played it to death on a mono Philips 'cassettecorder' in the summer of 1972. With such lo-fi equipment, it was impossible for my uneducated ears to tell what was guitar and what was organ.

This became a source of some embarrassment when I heard the album at my next school on stereo LP -- Garrard SP25 Mark IV turntable etc -- and discovered that I had been doing air guitar solos during some of Jon Lord's bits.

Since then, I have bought both the bog-standard Machine Head CD and the 25th anniversary remasters. With the release of the SACD, it becomes absolutely clear who plays which part, and also how dependent Jon Lord and Richie Blackmore were upon each other. No wonder, during the 'Who do we think we are' arguments when Purple were deciding who was going to have to leave to restore peace to the band, that Jon Lord realised he had to hold on to Blackmore for as long as possible.

Organists played a very different musical role in the 60s and early 70s, compared to the synth players who would soon follow them. Some, such as Hugh Banton of VdGG, could substitute for a missing bass player via his pedals. Jon Lord, on the other hand, sounds like he could substitute for a guitarist who had had an intoxicant too many. The duetting between Lord and Blackmore, and indeed the passages of note-for-note copying, are brought to the fore in this mix. The drum and bass recording is nothing special, though the mix reveals some percussion (e.g. on Space Truckin') that I hadn't been aware of before.

The inlay notes seem to be the same as for the 25th Remastered version.
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