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DC Universe: The Stories of Alan Moore [Paperback]

Alan Moore , Dave Gibbons , Curt Swan
3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)

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Book Description

24 Feb 2006
Hailed as one of the best and most influential writers in comics today, Alan Moore has penned such important and critically-acclaimed titles as "Watchmen", "V For Vendetta", "Swamp Thing" and "The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen". Now, some of his seminal superhero stories are collected for the first time in a single volume, including classic tales "Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow" (featuring Superman) and "The Killing Joke" (featuring Batman). Illustrated by a host of comic's finest artists, including Dave Gibbons ("Watchmen"), Brian Bolland ("Judge Dredd") and George Perez ("Crisis on Infinite Earths"), these tales are the perfect introduction to the master storyteller!


Product details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Titan Books Ltd (24 Feb 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1845762576
  • ISBN-13: 978-1845762575
  • Product Dimensions: 16.9 x 25.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 607,868 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

"All the ABC comics by Alan Moore are phenomenal," - Joss Whedon (creator of Buffy the Vampire Slayer)."

About the Author

Alan Moore is possibly the most well-known writer in the comics field today. His critically-acclaimed Watchmen, with collaborator Dave Gibbons, is regarded as one of the best graphic novels of all time. His work has appeared in 2000AD, Superman, Batman, Green Lantern and Swamp Thing. He is also the creator of the ABC line of comics that features the League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, Tom Strong and Promethea.

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Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
3.9 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A mixed bag 6 Nov 2010
By The Emperor TOP 1000 REVIEWER
Format:Paperback
Some moments of brilliance and some very average moments.
I am not a huge fan of the killing joke and it appears that Moore isn't either.
Whatever happened to the man of tomorrow was brilliant.
Quite a few of the other stories, especially the Green lantern ones were basically filler.
A couple of the stories involving minor characters turned out to be an unexpectedly pleasurable.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars New views of old characters 3 Feb 2007
By H
Format:Paperback
Over the years Alan Moore has taken a number of established charaters (Swamp Thing, Voodoo, Supreme etc) and revitalised them. But achieving this takes time and usually many months of publication. What this book contains is a collection of Moore one-offs (or two-offs) where he has added new dimensions in a very short time.

Don't expect Watchmen but still plenty of examples of Moore's talent for re-working old concepts and adding something fresh and original (Mr Mxyzptlk being the most outstanding - if you hate Mr Mxyzptlk as a character this is the book for you).

By the end of this book, I even felt sorry for the Joker!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Rookie Alan Moore 24 Dec 2012
Format:Paperback
It's hard to imagine now that, once upon a time, Alan Moore was just a regular old comic book writer, working on superheroes for DC and Marvel Comics like the rest of them. But, even before he reached an almost God-like status within the industry after producing Watchmen with Dave Gibbons, Alan Moore was a big deal at DC, and he could afford to be selective with what he wrote. But that isn't to say that everything he wrote back then was solid gold. As I discovered while reading this collection of all of Alan Moore's short stories for DC Comics, even he began as a rookie getting to grips with his craft. It's certainly not that any of comics reprinted in here are "bad". On the contrary, even the weaker stories in here stand up far better than most of your typical superhero comics from the 1980s, while the best of the bunch are established classics. As a huge Alan Moore fan, I find reading these early stories to be fascinating and informative, as it's great to see how my favourite comic book writer has developed over the years.

But if there's one thing that really struck me about this collection, it's the overwhelming love for the characters that pours through nearly all of these stories. As Alan Moore has been bitterly trying to distance himself from men in tights for the last few years, pouring scorn on DC and Marvel in particular and arguing that they should have ceased publishing superheroes in the 1960s, it's hard to imagine that he was actually once a huge fanboy. Moore has expressed his love for the superheroes he grew up reading many times over the years in his interviews and in the work he's produced, and this collection really shows that.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A mixed bag 17 Nov 2010
By The Emperor TOP 1000 REVIEWER
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Some moments of brilliance and some very average moments.
I am not a huge fan of the killing joke and it appears that Moore isn't either.
Whatever happened to the man of tomorrow was brilliant.
Quite a few of the other stories, especially the Green lantern ones were basically filler.
A couple of the stories involving minor characters turned out to be an unexpectedly pleasurable
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Indispensable 4 Dec 2009
By Paul McNamee TOP 500 REVIEWER VINE VOICE
Format:Paperback
This book collects all of Moore's work for DC barring his extended run on Swamp Thing. Many of the stories in this book are afforded a measure of classic (or cult) status, namely the Batman story The Killing Joke (which takes prominence on the cover) and Whatever Happened To The Man Of Tomorrow (a pre-relaunch 'finale' for Superman). Some would argue these two books alone are worth getting this collection for: I would argue the complete opposite.

I think Killing Joke a little insulting, frankly. In his now-reference origin story for Joker, Moore paints him as a down on his luck loser, a victim of circumstance whose supervillainy is a result of mistreatment and a life in the toilet. Yeah right. Personally, I prefer the notion that Batman (1989) put forward: that he was just a mean guy to begin with- that vat just pushed him over the sanity line. Beyond that (admittedly petty) reason for not liking the book, it's famous ending is not only a cop-out but completely despicable. Read it for yourself, or launch a counter-rant in the comments section if you already have, but as far as I'm concerned, people who laud it as one of the definitive bat-stories are just kissing booty.

As for WHTTMOT?, it's a case of Moore hypothetically wrapping up of of Supes' character's lives (friend and foe) from the perspective of a future journalist. There's a lot of potential in that notion and maybe if it had been granted a longer run (say ten issues) it could have been fully explored and might have been brilliant. As it is, it feels like a series of cameos (Bizarro's sudden change of personality and immediate death is ridiculous)and feels unfairly truncated.

But, what can you do with such limited space? Perhaps his ideas were too big for the amount of pages he was given.
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11 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Indispensable 4 Dec 2009
By Paul McNamee TOP 500 REVIEWER VINE VOICE
Format:Paperback
***NOTE - If you are looking at the new hardback edition of this book (released in 2012) please be aware that it does NOT include The Killing Joke or any of the Superman stories from the previous editions as they are now available in seprarate editions - Amazon has automatically put this review (which is for the paperback edition) on the page for the hardcover edition, and I do apologise for the confusion. As soon as I get a copy of the hardcover I'll update this review to reflect its contents***

This book collects all of Moore's work for DC barring his extended run on Swamp Thing. Many of the stories in this book are afforded a measure of classic (or cult) status, namely the Batman story The Killing Joke (which takes prominence on the cover) and Whatever Happened To The Man Of Tomorrow (a pre-relaunch 'finale' for Superman). Some would argue these two books alone are worth getting this collection for: I would argue the complete opposite.

I think Killing Joke a little insulting, frankly. In his now-reference origin story for Joker, Moore paints him as a down on his luck loser, a victim of circumstance whose supervillainy is a result of mistreatment and a life in the toilet. Yeah right. Personally, I prefer the notion that Batman (1989) put forward: that he was just a mean guy to begin with- that vat just pushed him over the sanity line. Beyond that (admittedly petty) reason for not liking the book, it's famous ending is not only a cop-out but completely despicable. Read it for yourself, or launch a counter-rant in the comments section if you already have, but as far as I'm concerned, people who laud it as one of the definitive bat-stories are just kissing booty.

As for WHTTMOT?
Read more ›
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