Cycling in the French Alps: Selected Cycle Tours and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more

Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Start reading Cycling in the French Alps on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Cycling in the French Alps: Selected Cycle Tours (Cicerone Cycling) [Paperback]

Paul Henderson
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)

Available from these sellers.


Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition 7.21  
Paperback 12.00  
Paperback, 17 Nov 2005 --  
There is a newer edition of this item:
Cycling in the French Alps: Selected Cycle Tours (Cicerone Guide) (Cicerone Guides) Cycling in the French Alps: Selected Cycle Tours (Cicerone Guide) (Cicerone Guides) 4.0 out of 5 stars (4)
12.00
In stock.

Book Description

17 Nov 2005 Cicerone Cycling
"Cycle Touring in the French Alps" presents a personal selection of the most picturesque cycling routes through the mountains of Southeast France. The eight tours - seven circuits plus the "Grand Traverse" from Geneva to Nice - include the "classic" high passes of the French Alps (Galibier, Iseran, Izoard, etc) as well as many lesser known areas of the pre-Alps and Southern Jura. Although all of the tours are in mountain areas, the scenery - from the rolling hills of the Bugey to the dramatic limestone gorges of the Chartreuse or the snowy peaks of the Ecrins - is extremely varied. Without neglecting the "must-see" places, the tours have been designed to take you through the secret corners and forgotten backwaters of the regions described; even amongst the most awe-inspiring mountains, it is often the more discreet facets of the countryside that reveal an area's true charm.

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • From mountain bikes to cycle computers, find 1000s of products in our bikes store.



Product details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Cicerone Press (17 Nov 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1852844450
  • ISBN-13: 978-1852844455
  • Product Dimensions: 21.2 x 13.8 x 1.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,173,063 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

About the Author

Most peoples' lives contain at least one significant turning point. Mine came in 1995 - on my 32nd birthday - when I moved to France to join my wife, Alice, who had found a job at the University of Savoie in Chambery. For the previous fourteen years, my love for the outdoors had found its outlet almost exclusively in rock-climbing, mostly in the UK. The change of address very quickly led to a change of focus with, at first, mountain biking, and then ski touring and road cycling taking up ever greater amounts of my free time. With the whole of the French Alps on my doorstep, I had a whole new playground to explore and, working as an English teacher, I had the time to make the best of it. Over the last ten years, I have come to know many of the Alpine massifs extremely well but, at the same time, I feel I have hardly scratched the surface of what my adopted home has to offer. The guides I have put together for Cicerone were motivated by a desire to share the joy I have found ski touring and cycling in the French Alps.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:


Customer Reviews

4 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
4.0 out of 5 stars
4.0 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Format:Paperback
I took this book along on my solo cycling trip in the French Alps, loaded with 90lbs of bike and bags. My itinerary was:
Col de la Ramaz
Col de la Savolière
Col du Ran Folly
Col de Joux Plane
Col de la Colombiere
Col de la Forclaz (Annecy)
Col du Marais
Col de la Croix Fry
Col des Aravis
Col des Saisies
Col de Méraillet
Cormet de Roselend
La Plagne
Col de la Madeleine
Col du Glandon
Col de la Croix de Fer
Col du Télégraphe
Col du Galibier
Col du Lauteret
Les Deux Alpes
Alpe d'Huez
Col d'Izoard
Col de Montgenèvre
Sestriere (Italy)
Colle delle Finestre (Italy)
Col du Mont Cenis
Col de l'Iseran
I found this book a great source for nice photos of the areas covered, and turn-by-turn directions to reach the Cols, but it had some major problems.
The turn-by-turn directions are not really needed! Any map will show how to reach the areas, as the French Alps are a deceptively small geographical area.
Another problem is a lack of an index for the cols. The book has a table of contents with the author's loop configuration for various tours of his devising, but you can't directly find "La Plagne" for instance. You have to look at a map of the loops, figure out which loop has the pass you're looking for, then page through the chapter until you find a reference in the description. His maps are simply awful, a sort of "connect the dots" drawing, with no geography or topography, and the scale of the distances on the maps appears distorted.
There are elevation charts to give one a general idea of the undulations of his routes from day to day.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Potentially good, but depends on your plans 12 Sep 2013
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Well written and put together, but seems to focus on bike touring over larger distances going from point to point, and as a result there aren't any 'day rides' which loop together. Given we didn't have panniers and were based in one place, in the end we didn't really get much use from it.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Extremely useful and informative 20 Jun 2013
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
I bought this book when I was considering a first lightweight long weekend cycle tour in the Alps. It was extremely useful in helping me decide where to go (mostly followed tour 5, with a couple of changes and added a day from tour 6). The guide is very well written with a general description of the route (usually a few pages). Each suggested day is then described with some ideas for sightseeing along the way. Each day also has turn by turn instructions with all the information you need (including length and gradient of each climb). Each day also have a table of towns and facilities which allows you to plan where you could pick up food, water, accommodation, (including a list of useful websites), etc. Finally, each tour has a profile running along the bottom of the pages (to the same relative scale). The authors photographs illustrate the guide well, but do not really do justice to the views on offer. I cannot recommend this book highly enough if you are planning to ride some of the cols and passes in the French Alps. I can't wait to go back to try another couple.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars very good 16 Jan 2013
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
I bought this book for my son who will be cycling in France this year, and he says it will be very useful, and informative
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.0 out of 5 stars  2 reviews
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars It was the best of sources, it was the worst of sources 7 Mar 2012
By Dennis Ketterling - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I took this book along on my solo cycling trip in the French Alps, loaded with 90lbs of bike and bags. My itinerary was:
Col de la Ramaz
Col de la Savolière
Col du Ran Folly
Col de Joux Plane
Col de la Colombiere
Col de la Forclaz (Annecy)
Col du Marais
Col de la Croix Fry
Col des Aravis
Col des Saisies
Col de Méraillet
Cormet de Roselend
La Plagne
Col de la Madeleine
Col du Glandon
Col de la Croix de Fer
Col du Télégraphe
Col du Galibier
Col du Lauteret
Les Deux Alpes
Alpe d'Huez
Col d'Izoard
Col de Montgènèvre
Sestriere (Italy)
Colle delle Finestre (Italy)
Col du Mont Cenis
Col de l'Iseran
I found this book a great source for nice photos of the areas covered, and turn-by-turn directions to reach the Cols, but it had some major problems.
The turn-by-turn directions are not really needed! Any map will show how to reach the areas, as the French Alps are a deceptively small geographical area.
Another problem is a lack of an index for the cols. The book has a table of contents with the author's loop configuration for various tours of his devising, but you can't directly find "La Plagne" for instance. You have to look at a map of the loops, figure out which loop has the pass you're looking for, then page through the chapter until you find a reference in the description. His maps are simply awful, a sort of "connect the dots" drawing, with no geography or topography, and the scale of the distances on the maps appears distorted.
There are elevation charts to give one a general idea of the undulations of his routes from day to day. If you take his planned routes, they are continuous, along the bottom of the page, over the number of days each route takes. I don't think most people on a once-in-a-lifetime trip will follow his routes exactly. You'll find yourself jumping from chapter to chapter to map your own route.
Unfortunately, the descriptions of the great climbs of the Alps are prosaic and uninformative. His description of the Col de la Colombiere? "The first part of the ascent, to le Reposoir,is a mere warm-up for the serious work ahead: over the last 8km to the summit the average gradient is almost 9%!" That's it, the entire description of the climb. The Col de la Madeleine? "The climb to the Madeleine is long (25km), but the gradient is quite variable and every few kilometres there are flatter sections where your legs can relax a little." The Col du Galibier? "Whether or not you have the road to yourself, cycling over the Galibier is always a challenge: there are a few easy sections and the last kilometre is the steepest."
I found the book useful for general information on the area, with nice photography, a listing of available facilities and services such as water, as well as shops, cafes, campsites, B&Bs, banks and bike shops (always iffy, as these things change on a continuous basis), but as for good, hard information on the daunting physical challenges of cycling in the Alps, not so good.
However, it is a testament to the lack of any other comprehensive guide to cycling in the Alps, that I have to say this book is almost indispensible if you want to take a cycling trip in the area. I have to give kudos for his effort, but in many frustrating ways, the book is a huge disappointment; but buy it. There is more specific information on many websites, but you won't find anything better in conventional book form.
3.0 out of 5 stars Good - could be better 2 Oct 2013
By B Browne - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
Useful but could be better.
The first section of the grand traverse contains a long narrative for the whole trip between Geneva and Nice; the next section is a description of each days route.
This leaves you flicking between the long narrative and the each days route section . It would be better if the long narrative section was disposed of the information contained in it was included in the description to each days route.

Great route / cycle by the way.
Newer guides should somehow try to give sat nav file.
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback