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Cycle of Violence Paperback – 13 Nov 1995


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Product details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins (13 Nov. 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0006479359
  • ISBN-13: 978-0006479352
  • Product Dimensions: 19.7 x 1.7 x 13.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 432,947 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Bateman was a journalist in Northern Ireland before becoming a full-time writer. His first novel, DIVORCING JACK, won the Betty Trask Prize, and all his novels have been critically acclaimed. He wrote the screenplays for the feature films DIVORCING JACK and WILD ABOUT HARRY and the popular TV series MURPHY'S LAW starring James Nesbitt. Bateman lives in Northern Ireland with his family.

Product Description

From the Back Cover

Bicycling journalist Miller is exiled from his big-city paper to small-town Crossmaheart. There, he is to replace another reporter, Jamie Milburn, who has disappeared – to no one's great surprise, since Crossmaheart is a notoriously fatal place in which to ask questions.

Miller aims to keep his head down, but as soon as he gets involved with Jamie's girlfriend Marie, that plan, and much else besides, begins to fall apart.

Darkly funny, romantic, disturbing and suspenseful, 'Cycle of Violence' is the brilliant new novel from the author of the bestselling 'Divorcing Jack'.

"An Ulster Carl Hiaasen"
MAIL ON SUNDAY

'Divorcing Jack:'

"A joy from start to finish…Witty, fast-paced and throbbing with menace, 'Divorcing Jack' reads like 'The Thirty-Nine Steps' rewritten for the '90s by Roddy Doyle"
TIME OUT

"Will do for Belfast and South Armagh what Bram Stoker did for Transylvania"
RTE GUIDE

"As sharp as a pint of snake-bite…manages to say more about the Troubles in 280 vivid pages than reams of earnest reportage ever could"
SUNDAY TIMES

About the Author

Colin Bateman was born in Northern Ireland in 1962 and educated at Bangor Grammar School before joining the ‘County Down Spectator’, where he became the deputy editor until 1996. In 1990 he received a Journalist’s Fellowship to Oxford University for his reports from Uganda and has received a Northern Ireland Press Award for his weekly satirical column. He won the Betty Trask Award in 1994.


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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By P J LINDSAY on 24 Nov. 2002
Format: Paperback
Bateman was a master of satirical humour and black comedy in his writing days at the County Down Spectator, giving readers the cover price enjoyment alone with his witty and unusual insight to local and parochial charachters in and around his fast moving journalistic lifestyle.
His books have a lasting grip which leaves you crying for more as he rips and strips his charachters bare, leaving the tears running down your cheeks.
Dan Starkey is without doubt the typical Belfast boy with a glint in his eye and he has hopped from novel to novel without becoming washed out.
If it says BATEMAN ON THE COVER - BUY IT!!!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By David Dempsey on 11 Aug. 2003
Format: Paperback
This was the firt book Ive read by Bateman, what can really be said about it bar superb, the twists and turns in this book are unexpected and will keep you laughing and in ssense all the way thorugh the book.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 5 Nov. 2000
Format: Paperback
l brought this book l was attracted by its bizzare cover, as it wasn't the usual type of book l would read, but l was going to stay with the family at christmas and was in a rush to find an escape. Well it certainly saved me from the family at xmas, l was in my own world curled up in the chair next to the fire. Colin Bateman style of writing was completly new to me, it constantly had me on edge. l then went on to read all his books after that, but cycle of violence will always be my favourite book, l have forced most of my friends to read it. lf you like a book with a twist and even a turn then it is the book for you, trust me you will be hooked the moment you pick it up.
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By A. Ross TOP 500 REVIEWER on 29 Dec. 2012
Format: Paperback
I saw the film Divorcing Jack (based on a Bateman novel of the same name) many years ago, enjoyed it, then saw this in the store and bought it, and now, some 15 years or so later, I've finally got around to reading it. The good news is that my initial instinct was right -- I love comic fiction, and if it's dark comedy, so much the better. This book fits the bill nicely, with line after line of comic wordplay and nasty humor. Miller is a loose cannon of an investigative journalist who is banished from his Belfast gig after insulting his boss in a drunken tirade, and sent to work at a provincial arm of the paper in a tiny town called Crossmaheart (har har). Unfortunately for him, this being Northern Ireland in the mid-1990s, the town is crawling with IRA and Orangemen looking to off each other, as well as anyone who gets in the way. And one person who might have gotten in the way is Miller's predecessor, who has disappeared. But on the plus side of this banishment, there's the lovely and tempestuous barmaid Marie, with whom Miller quickly becomes besotten. However, since she was Milburn's girlfriend prior to his disappearance, the situation is a little tricky. And thus, darkly wacky antics ensue -- with a body count to rival your typical blockbuster thriller, along with plenty of laughs. Bateman is the kind of writer whose response to a tragic situation is to stare it in the face and point out how absurd it is by milking it for all the dark laughs he can get (the book includes probably the best Holocaust joke I've come across). Definitely worth reading if you like good wordplay and comic writing, and/or have an interest in Ireland.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By SW on 15 Oct. 2010
Format: Paperback
This book was a present, and it took me a few years to get around to reading it. The opening appealed to me as the lead feels orphaned at 28 when is Da dies. I loved the dark humour and throw away comments. A very clever and funny book.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Mike P on 7 April 2006
Format: Paperback
After reading the first couple of pages, I laughed so hard I followed through, but seeing as I was reading it on the toilet at the time, it wasn't so bad.
Bateman incorporates black and un-pc humour in an excellent novel. Prepare for a journey among the odd folk of Crossmaheart, where prejudice exists with a capital P. From the Police to the old folk, no-one gives a damn (or even has one to give for that matter).
Read it and laugh, then lend it to your family - marvellous stuff!!
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