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Culloden And The Last Clansman [Paperback]

James Hunter
4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
RRP: 8.99
Price: 6.91 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over 10. Details
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Book Description

3 Jun 2010

An armed uprising. A conspiracy. An assassination. A hanging. These events, starting with the crushing of Jacobite rebels at Culloden in 1746 and culminating six years later in the so-called Appin Murder, provided Robert Louis Stevenson with the plot of his enduringly popular novel Kidnapped. But truth can be every bit as dramatic as fiction. And never more so than in this account of what lay behind the killing of government officer Colin Campbell by a hidden gunman on a May afternoon in 1752.

Campbell was on his way to evict rebels from the Ardshiel estate near Appin, and Britain's rulers saw in his murder a terrorist act committed by Jacobite survivors of Culloden. When the alleged killer evaded a Scotland-wide manhunt and escaped abroad, politicians insisted someone had to pay for Campbell's death.The sacrificial lamb was James Stewart, a Culloden veteran who had been organising resistance to Campbell's evictions. James was found guilty in the show trial that followed and was hanged close to the murder scene. His body was left suspended there for years as a grim warning to anyone else thinking of challenging the new order the British state had imposed on the Jacobite Highlands.


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Culloden And The Last Clansman + Glencoe and the Indians + Last of the Free: A History of the Highlands and Islands of Scotland
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Product details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Mainstream Publishing (3 Jun 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1845965426
  • ISBN-13: 978-1845965426
  • Product Dimensions: 13.2 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 83,303 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

"A fascinating retelling of the Appin murder" (The Herald)

"A stunning chronicle of the uprising and the subsequent Appin Murder" (Daily Record)

About the Author

James Hunter is the author of a number of books on Scottish history, including Scottish Exodus, A Dance Called America and Skye: The Island. He lives in Beauly, Inverness-shire.

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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Great Scottish Hero And Martyr 9 Mar 2007
Format:Hardcover
James Hunter lays before the reader an inspiring account of the life of James Of The Glen, an unsung hero. Besides his use of documented historical source materials, he makes use of local folklore to give a more rounded portrait of James Stewart. Stewart is revealed as the foster father of the historical Alan Breck. Breck was later incorporated into Robert Lewis Stevenson's best selling novel Kidnapped, in which he rescues David Balfour, the novel's main character. Hunter reveals the barbarity visited upon those Highland Scots who had remained loyal to the deposed Stuart king, James VII. The German prince, The Duke of Cumberland, and a number of his officers are accurately depicted as cruel tyrants. This historical work exposes the genocidal policy of the British State, in regard to the Highland clans. It is shocking, that Scottish school children have been purposely denied a full knowledge of these events, events that could be described as the Scottish holocaust. I thoroughly recommend this excellent book. Anthony Cooper (co-author William Wallace Robin Hood Revealed)
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Culloden and the last clansman 29 Aug 2011
Format:Paperback
This is the best account of culloden, the stewart dynasty and the aftermarth i have ever read. I could not put the book down and devoured every detail.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Brutality of crushing the Jacobite rebellion. 20 May 2012
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
This book explores the Jacobite Rebellion, The reasons for Culloden the bloodbath and subsequent slaughter, by Butcher Cumberland aided by lowland Scots.
It also covers the Appin murder of Colin Campbell an agent for the English government.
The sacrificial lamb, James Stewart, a Culloden veteran who was hanged after a shabby trial (he wasn't the murderer) but it appeased the frightened English. To learn more, buy and read this book, you won't be disappointed.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A great and captivating read. 15 Mar 2011
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
If you can pick up a book and that book sends you out to find things, research them and discover what was previously hidden to you then it gets the thumbs up from me.

I'm in Edinburgh, while the Highlands and the areas mentioned in this book are not exactly on my doorstep they are a mere 3 or 4 hours away. So, there are still signs and landmarks around to be seen today that the characters in this tragic tale saw 250 years ago.

I love RLS' Kidnapped and Catriona so inevitably, they led me to this book. It's a great read and when you're scrabbling about amongst the trees or rocks looking for signs of James Stewart and his past it makes it so much more exciting.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Detailed History of Duror after Culloden 14 Sep 2008
By Mr. Ross Maynard VINE VOICE
Format:Hardcover
It was Robert Louis Stevenson who, in "Kidnapped", romanticised the tale of James of the Glen, Alan Breck and the murder of Colin Campbell, Hanoverian factor of confiscated lands. James of the Glen was hanged as an accessory to the murder in 1752, and Alan Breck fled to France accused of firing the fatal shot. Now a memorial stands at the site of James' hanging, directly under the Ballachulish Bridge (south side); while a mile or two towards Duror the site of the murder is also marked on Forestry Commission land - an atmospheric spot. James Hunter's book takes us as close to the truth of the events in the case as it is possible to get. The book is immensely well researched and very detailed - and it is best read with a map of the area to hand to locate the places involved.

James Hunter is clear that the evidence against James of the Glen was largely trumped up to reinforce the iron fist of Hanoverian rule after Culloden. Mr Hunter is also clear that the evidence against Alan Breck is inconclusive. It would have made an interesting chapter to explore the lives of the other possible suspects in more detail but sadly, at this distance, the evidence does not exist to point any fingers, or even to name all the suspects.

The book will be of most interest to those who want to know the truth of the "Kidnapped" story, and those who know and love Duror. It is well written, though if you have little or no connection to the area you may find it too detailed to be compelling. For lovers of the area, this is a must-read.
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