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Cujo Paperback – 10 Nov 2011

4 out of 5 stars 86 customer reviews

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£8.83 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books. Only 14 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

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Product details

  • Paperback: 432 pages
  • Publisher: Hodder Paperbacks (10 Nov. 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1444708120
  • ISBN-13: 978-1444708127
  • Product Dimensions: 13.1 x 2.9 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (86 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 139,251 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Amazon Review

Cujo is so well paced and scary that people tend to read it quickly, so they mostly remember the scene of the mother and son trapped in the hot Pinto and threatened by the rabid Cujo, forgetting the multifaceted story in which that scene is embedded. This is definitely a novel that rewards re-reading. When you read it again, you can pay more attention to the theme of country folk versus city folk; the parallel marriage conflicts of the Cambers versus the Trentons; the poignancy of the amiable St Bernard (yes, the breed choice is just right) infected by a brain-destroying virus that makes it into a monster; and the way the "daylight burial" of the failed ad campaign is reflected in the sunlit Pinto that becomes a coffin. And how significant it is that this horror tale is not supernatural: it's as real as junk food, a failing marriage, a broken-down car, or a fatal virus. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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King is unbeatable (Mirror)

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
There are many commonly held misconceptions in the world, and one of these is that Stephen King is a "Horror" writer. But he's not. He simply writes some bloody good stories that, occasionally, have horrible things happen in them. Cujo is like this. I have been reading this at tea breaks and on the bus over the last few days, occasionally breathless, caught up in the suspense. Forget the film. It's not in the same league as the book. I almost didn't read this because I saw the film a number of years ago and remembered it as ok...ish. But the book was a different story. Different ending too. VERY sad ending and one that had me cursing that SK could DO such a thing! I loved the fact that we could "hear" Cujo's "thoughts". It's how I've always imagined my dog "thinks". Not WHAT i think he thinks (I hope...) but in terms of THE MAN, THE BOY etc.

This book made me remember why I love Stephen King's writing. 1 small criticism which is why 4 instead of 5*'s - There are too many loose ends at the end. Another few pages of an epilogue so I could have closure on the the characters who died, what happened to the bloke who vandalised the house and how everything else settled down. There is one of sorts, but it's too sparse.

Overall, one of Mr. King's best. And you know that his best are very special indeed.
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Format: Paperback
I am (re)reading Stephen King's works in chronological order and this re-read was up next for me. I originally read the book when it was first published in 1981 making me 13yo. It made a big impression on me at the time and I was quite shocked it ended the way it did. The change in the movie ending infuriated me. Re-reading it all these years later, I don't find it anywhere near as good as what King had written to this point, though better than Firestarter. Cujo is a short book compared to the other's but longer than Carrie. I had thought this was going to be pure realistic horror but had forgotten about the boogieman element. King goes about playing this realistic, frighteningly possible story of a rabid dog wandering in a rural backwoods area while adding in just a touch of the paranormal which we could believe is imagination on the part of the participants but King won't let us off that easily. Cujo has a small cast of characters and King does something different here for the first time (disregarding the Bachman books) by spending a lot of time on character development of the main handful of major players. There is not even any threat until well over 100 pages in which is 1/3 of the book. King also chooses to write from the dog's point of view occasionally; this is a tricky thing to do and pull off well. But The King does it! Cujo's thoughts come much less frequently than any others, and his passages are always short lending great credibility and success to Cujo never becoming personified. He is always an animal, even though the reader is party to his brief canine thoughts. A good quick read.Read more ›
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Format: Paperback
Unless you've been living under a rock (Or some kind of creepy hiding place), you will know by now that Stephen King's Cujo, is a classic horror tale about a Saint Bernard dog, that gets bitten by a rabid bat and goes on a rampage more violent than Marvin Hagler versus Tommy Hearns.

What you wont know is that this book is a slow building page turner, that is tense, brutal and extremely violent in places. King takes no prisoners with this dark and gory tale.
Cujo has a slow start, but it creatively builds to a crescendo of violence and dread.

The book starts off peacefully enough. Cujo, a giant friendly Saint Bernard is out adventuring on his family farm and he ends up chasing a rabbit into a small hole/cave. This is all a bit of fun for the big friendly giant, but unfortunately for Cujo (And the residents of Castle Rock) the small hole doesn't just hold a scared little rabbit. It is also the home to a swarm of rabid bats. And these blood suckers, do not take kindly to the 200 pound dog invading on their turf. One bite and Cujo's life is changed forever. As each day goes by, he is transformed from a friendly loveable household pet, into a 200 pound juggernaut of death and destruction.

One thing that really works about this book is the fact that king lets you inside Cujo's head. You hear every one of his thoughts and its an idea that really works. It makes the character more human and you understand why the dog acts so psychotic towards the end of the book. You are brought along for his whole transformation. You will despise Cujo in places, but at the same time, you understand that his mind is only reacting to the poisonous rage that is flowing through his veins.
When the dog's mind is finally corrupted, he hates everything and everyone.
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Format: Paperback
CUJO is the famous story of the huge great St.Bernard dog, who having contracted rabies from some poorly bats who bit his nose, lays siege to Donna and Tad Trenton in their broken down car. The story is simple, but King develops his characters well, and the supporting cast get full histories, outlooks and characterisations. Donna and Vic Trenton are married but in trouble - Vic has work problems and Donna has just ended a messy affair, which the other party gleefully informs Vic about. Tad, their four year old son, is scared of monsters in his closet, and isn't happy about Daddy having to go away on a business trip. Their car, a knackered old Pinto, is giving up the ghost and in dire need of some tinkering. Old Joe Camber lives on the outskirts of Castle Rock; he's a cheap but reliable mechanic. His wife is scared of him, and when she unexpectedly wins a packet on the lottery she takes her son on a little family interstate trip. Joe is left alone with his drunken pervert friend Gary from next door, and his sons huge dog Cujo to keep him company. Events conspire to that final simple occurrence; Donna and Tad trapped in a dead Pinto, outside Joe's garage while a disoriented, pained and very confused dog is getting very angry at everything.

Its not just the human characters that King draws well but Cujo himself is painted in a very sympathetic manner; before the disease Cujo is a big loveable furry heap of a dog, a huge gentle giant, but illness makes him hurt, makes his head pound, makes him confused. Cujo is not the villain here, the villain is rabies, and the villain is fate; the day-to-day living with the card you were dealt, and how twists and turns of fate can affect many others inextricably linked with your destiny.
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