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on 6 November 2012
It is encouraging that the Cryengine 3 was used to make actual successful games, like the Crysis series. This helps validate the book's appeal to a newcomer. But be aware that the book is not a quick read. Yes, much effort has been expended by the package's developers to streamline the steps you need to do within it to make various and many effects. The reality is that game development has so much in the way of details and coding that is indispensible.

Specifically, you need a pre-existing background in programming. This book is not akin to one on, say, webpage design (like this one I recently reviewed, Learning Adobe Muse). Game development is far more complex. Many details cannot be swept under the rug of an SDK GUI. Consequently, the book has snippets of C++ code that demonstrate certain points of functionality. Oh, and that means you need to know C++. By the way, the choice of C++ is accurate. Serious game programming tends to fall back on C++ as the underlying language of choice, or necessity, to be more pragmatic. C++ and its core originating subset, C, gets close to the silicon, for maximum performance.

The book has many recommendations germane to the practicalities of game development. One keen aspect is the use of white boxing. Where you model some object with a simpler geometrical object, in the interests of rapid prototyping. The idea is to get quickly to a baseline functionality so that your testers and you can get feedback on how the game plays. Later, you can go back and build the final object.

While I mentioned the need to know C++, it turns out that Cryengine has alternatives. You can do scripting. Here the design flow is more rapid than having to wait for your machine to compile and link in C++ changes. The scripting language is Lua, (see Programming in Lua, Second Edition for a text devoted to it). But Cryengine proffers another and very different scripting approach. The use of visual scripting via what it calls a Flow Graph. This is a graphical drag and drop method of hooking up various entities, from the output of one to the input of another. Very intuitive and akin to chip layout software, if you have that background. Again, to do rapid development, either scripting approach may benefit you.
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on 4 November 2012
any reference for cryengine is great and the style of the authors is very good, however this book has many identical chapters to the cookbook by the same authors, so it's too expensive if you get both. I think the cookbook is the better book of the two.
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on 21 April 2015
Very much out of date so most of the functions you try to produce aren't supported anymore, plus the UI has changed lots since this book was released not to mention UE4 is now free to the public
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