Cry Of The Newborn: The Ascendants Of Estorea Book 1 and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
Buy Used
£1.91
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Used: Good | Details
Sold by Tree Savers
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: A used book that is in a good, clean condition. Your item will be picked, packed and posted FREE to you within the UK by Amazon, also eligible for free Super Saver delivery.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Cry of the Newborn: The Ascendants of Estorea Book 1 (GOLLANCZ S.F.) Paperback – 14 Sep 2006


See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback, 14 Sep 2006
£3.82 £0.01


Product details

  • Paperback: 832 pages
  • Publisher: Gollancz; paperback / softback edition (14 Sept. 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 057507812X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0575078123
  • Product Dimensions: 12.8 x 5 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 668,348 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

James Barclay was born in Felixstowe, Suffolk, in 1965 and is the third of four children. He gained a BA (Hons) in Communication Studies in Sheffield before heading to London to train as an actor. With acting roles in short supply, he worked in marketing and advertising until 2004 when he became a full time author.

James is the creator of the two Raven trilogies: Chronicles of The Raven and Legends of The Raven, and the epic fantasy duology, The Ascendants of Estorea. Following that, he published the seventh and last Raven novel, Ravensoul. He has written two novellas, Light Stealer and Vault of Deeds. He is currently working on a new fantasy trilogy, the first of which, Once Walked With Gods was published in August 2010.

Away from fantasy, James is writing contemporary young adult fiction, and is collaborating on a TV drama, a comedy sketch show and a very British screenplay. James has recently begun acting again and has a role in a gritty Brit-pic called 'The Estate.' The film will premiere in October 2010.

For his sins, James is a lifelong supporter of Ipswich Town FC and still believes England will win the next major championship they play. He loves watching cricket, rugby, tennis and darts and indeed plays all these sports when he can. He's just not very good at any of them.

Beyond writing and acting, James spends as much time as possible with his son, Oscar, who was three in January 2010, his wife, Clare, and Mollie the Hungarian Vizsla. That's a dog to anyone not in the know. They all live in Teddington, Middlesex.

Product Description

Review

The large scale battles are detailed and exhilarating. Cry of the Newborn is a satisyingly self-contained fantasy blockbuster.. set against a more thoughtful, realistic background. (David Langford SFX)

A novel of staggering scope and skilfull storytelling. The Cry of the Newborn is a massive and epic work and looks likely to (deservedly) cement Barclay's place amongst the UK's very best fantasy storytellers. (John Berlyne SF REVU) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Book Description

A completely new, breakout series from 'the Sergio Leone of the genre'(SFX)

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Walnut47 on 8 Jun. 2006
Format: Paperback
i loved the raven series and was mortified when i finished the last of them, so i was really pleased when i heard about newborn. this was tempered slightly when i saw the size of it, its a monster! and for the first half of it i was

lost in a sea of funny names (for people and places) and alot of administrative detail that i found hard to digest. however i believe its all necessary and totally worth it. when it all 'kicks off' the story flys and the characters are so solid they might as well have been real people. the children are a little plodding as characters but they seem to be picking up with age. all in all i loved it, the battles are exquisite (as Barclay always are) im so looking forward to the sequel, cant believe its not out till september!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Nick Brett TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 12 Jan. 2006
Format: Paperback
After his highly entertaining Raven series, many of us were waiting this new series with eager anticipation.
This is set in a world where a Roman type empire is expanding and funding itself through taxation and the drafting of local armies. Very much the key elements are expansion, tax and religion. Into this world comes the birth of four children with exceptional powers that are at odds with the agreed religion of the empire.
This comes at a time where the empire over-expands and becomes involved in a war that they are on the verge of losing, the future of the empire is at stake! And what of the powers being wielded by the four children…?
This is a brave attempt by the author to move away from his Raven chronicles and to venture into new territories. I loved his Raven stuff and was really looking forward to this….
Initially I was quite depressed and frustrated, the story gets off to a very slow start and some of the hierarchy was confusing and over detailed. For 100 pages or so I thought the author had delivered a stinker but then suddenly it all kicked off and the story sucked me in. The story became exciting, the characters started to flesh out and the action became intense.
In the end I really enjoyed it and all credit to the author, it is another winner.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Mr. James A. Flinders on 5 Mar. 2007
Format: Paperback
I bought this as soon as it came out. I read the Raven novels with great enjoyment, so I had very high hopes for this.

I wasn't disappointed. It is a little slower in pace than Dawntheif at the beginning, but once it builds up the momentum, you cannot put it down. Again James Barclay has created a wonderfully visual and brilliantly imagined magic system, a set of characters beautifully realised, some you will love, others you will hate. Paul Jehred in particular is a blazing character :) utterly brilliant stuff.

I'm currently reading Shout for the Dead, which is continuing the series in excellent fashion.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By R. S. Brar on 19 Nov. 2007
Format: Paperback
The main gripe I have with this book is that it is 800 pages long, the author could have comfortably covered the material needed within 400 pages. It was a struggle to get through, but ultimately it is a diverting story that is told. It slowly builds up and just takes too long to get going.

The 4 ascendants are the main point of the story, and we have to go through how they deal with their powers. This develops from standard fantasy story device to something much more interesting as they are fleshed out into different characters. Also Barclay manages convey a real sense of how their magic works and the toll it takes on the children and the reaction of the rest of the continent.

The war is superbly described, from the small raids on towns to the larger pitched battles between armies. Not only the battles but the consequences the war has on the different countries involved.

The stand out character is Exchequer, the tax-man steals the show with his hard nosed approach to collections and loyalty the Conquard.

If you have the patience, this is an enjoyable book, but be warned there is a second part to trudge through, which will probably be just as long.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By DanT on 23 Jun. 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
i have to agree in part with the poorer reviews, this is not as fast or as witty as the raven books all of which i thought were great. It does take a lot of time for the characters to take shape and few of them grabbed my interest immediately. The roman type empire was a little hard to get a handle on initially, unless of course you already have good roman knowledge. It is worth sticking with it though because it does pick up considerably and by the time you reach the end you really do want to find out what is comming in the second book, which is far more interesting and moves at a much faster pace.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Grant on 27 Jun. 2013
Format: Paperback
This is book has a slow first two hundred or so pages. The author though uses these pages to create vivid characters that don't fit in any one mold. Well except Gorian but every good book needs a megalomaniac or two. The middle of the book begins to pick up pace but suffers from focusing on the supporting military characters too much to the point that non-military characters fail to develop properly with motives becoming that of typical fantasy or non-existent. The last third of the book the pace is there moving the reader page to page but the issues from the middle of the book become prominent in the end with supporting military characters falling into general genre roles. With each military character becoming nearly invincible or suffering some minor non-life threatening injury. The book would have benefited greatly from the deaths of a few more supporting characters and for the characters who at the begining of the book were so broad and life-like to not become stereotypical roles. Chief among them being Jherd who was unique and colorful before falling into a guardian like role by the end of the novel. Also this book (at least the edition i read) had no map which left me at times confused where in Barclays world characters were.

Yes the book has faults and characters becoming genre classics (defender, honest general, star struck lover) but it manages to create a unique and inviting world.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Look for similar items by category


Feedback