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Crusader Archaeology: The Material Culture of the Latin East Hardcover – 24 Jun 1999

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 290 pages
  • Publisher: Routledge; Ill edition (24 Jun. 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0415173612
  • ISBN-13: 978-0415173612
  • Product Dimensions: 3.2 x 17.1 x 25.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,321,685 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Review

"The book concentrates on archaeological material from modern Israel, which covers much of the Kingdom of Jerusalem...and material from the island of Cyprus..."Crusader Archaeologyis an eloquent contribution to the field and the first of its kind since Meiron Benvesti's 1970 volume"The Crusaders in the Holy Land."-Journal of Anthropological Research "This exceptionally well illustrated book offers a splendid addition to understanding the history of the Middle Ages and particularly the Crusades....[T]his book is an invaluable guide to the extensive material culture and society of Crusader times....The author has succeeded in producing a study of fundamental importance to readers interested in the Middle Ages."-"Choice "This exceptionally well illustrated book offers a splendid addition to understanding the history of the Middle Ages and particularly the Crusades. In combining history and archaeology (with emphasis in this book on the latter), the author has succeeded in producing a study of fundamental importance to readers interested in the Middle Ages at all levels."-"Choice, 3/00

About the Author

Adrian J.Boas is Lecturer in medieval archaeology at the Hebrew University, Jerusalem, and at haifa University. He has directed excavations at a crusader village and a number of castles near Jerusalem.

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On 27 November 1095 at Clermont in the Auvergne Pope Urban II spoke before a crowded audience of clerics and laymen. Read the first page
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I appreciate the author's view point to survey and analyse the crusader sites in the Middle East. Although I found it a bit semplice and sometimes its study lacks of depth. Probably, this is intentional in order to capture a broader audience.
What I appreciate is the many maps and pictures (but only in B&W that is not what a broad audience wants!) and its systematic approach to review each single site.
Finally, there is no mention for castles and ruins in Turkey (i.e. the county of Edessa) nor about Armenian fortifications and cities that are really remarkable. For example Rumkale on the Euphrates or Biredjik or Urfa (Edessa) or Cursat etc.
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By A. Evans on 3 April 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The archaeology of the crusades is a surprisingly under-researched topic, largely owing to the political and cultural difficulties in assessing much of the material outside Israel. This text (now 15 years old) is a rather authoritative overview of the topic.

If one is studying Levantine castles, however, as I was - there isn't a great deal of material here one couldn't find elsewhere.

A fully updated edition would be a useful undertaking for the author.
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Format: Hardcover
An excellently written account of Crusader archaeology, and a perfect source for Undergraduates studying the topic. The text is intelligently written, yet accessible.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 2 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
A Goldmine of Information -- Especially for Historical Novelists of the Period 21 Sept. 2014
By Helena P. Schrader - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Crusader Archaeology by Adrian J. Boas is a well-organized and comprehensive summary of key archaeological finds from the crusader period in the Holy Land. It provides the layman with an overview of the archaeological evidence from the crusader states uncovered to date and the bibliography provides the reader with a large number of sources that can be consulted for greater detail about any specific topic. Boas writes in a fluid and clear style that makes his often highly specialized subject matter comprehensible even for those not familiar with archeological and architectural jargon. This is a good starting point for anyone interested in the archeology of the crusader states.

As Boas demonstrates, modern archeology increasingly provides evidence to challenge many presumptions and prejudices about crusader “barbarity” — or decadence. The exquisite quality of crusader sculpture, frescoes, manuscripts, and glass-work, the evidence of glass-panes in sacred and secular buildings, the bright and wide-range of colors of the textiles, paintings and glass are all evidence of a culture that was anything but primitive. Equally important, the artifacts that have come to light demonstrate the unique and distinctive nature of crusader arts, crafts and, indeed, lifestyle. As Boas underlines with respect to a variety of fields, far from simply adopting the allegedly more civilized life-style of their enemies or predecessors, the crusaders blended familiar styles, particularly Romanesque art and architecture, with Byzantine traditions in mosaics, wall-painting and sculpture. On a more mundane level, textiles in the crusader states were not simply made of the wide range of materials from goat’s and sheep’s wool and linen to cotton and silk, they also included hybrid fabrics using silk and one of the other kinds of thread.

For the historical novelist, this is a gold-mine of useful information! Boas provides photos, sketches and descriptions that enable a novelist to picture the rural and urban dwellings of both rich and poor. His descriptions and photos of objections in daily use such as pottery, lamps, and textiles are equally valuable. The book is also filled with gems of information which can be used to give a novel greater color — such as the street in Jerusalem known as the “Street of Evil Cooking,” which was lined with the crusader equivalent of “fast-food” stands catering to pilgrims. Now that’s the kind of fact that any novelist can use to enliven a description of the Holy City in the age of the Leper King!
World class seller and reknown Crusade historian. 7 April 2015
By Sam - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The author is a world class historian and I look forward to the read, however, the Seller's book was a surprise it was new old stock, a bargain shipped quickly and perfectly thank you.
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