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Critique Of Pure Reason: Kant : Critique Of Pure Reason (Everyman) Paperback – 7 Dec 1993

4 out of 5 stars 13 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 624 pages
  • Publisher: W&N; New Ed edition (7 Dec. 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 046087358X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0460873581
  • Product Dimensions: 19.8 x 13 x 3.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,084,651 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

Eric Watkins has done a fine job of abridging the Critique to a manageable size while preserving those sections most often assigned in a survey course, including enough of the Analytic to provide a continuous argument. Students will get a good sense of the whole from the parts he includes. I recommend it enthusiastically. --Kenneth R. Winkler, Wellesley College --This text refers to the Library Binding edition.

Book Description

This entirely new translation of Critique of Pure Reason is the most accurate and informative English translation ever produced of this epochal philosophical text. Its simple, direct style will make it suitable for all new readers of Kant, however the translation displays a sophistication that will enlighten Kant scholars as well. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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That all our knowledge begins with experience there can be no doubt. Read the first page
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I don't normally write reviews, but in this case I feel I have to warn other people away from buying this on the mistaken assumption that it contains the full critique of pure reason. The prefaces, transcendental dialetic and transcendental doctrine of method are missing entirely. If you only want to read the first half of the Critique, then this edition is fine. But if, like me, you wanted the full book, don't waste your money. Go find a different edition.
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Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) is considered one of the giants of philosophy, of his age or any other. It is largely this book that provides the foundation of this assessment. Whether one loves Kant or hates him (philosophically, that is), one cannot really ignore him; even when one isn't directly dealing with Kantian ideas, chances are great that Kant is made an impact.
Kant was a professor of philosophy in the German city of Konigsberg, where he spent his entire life and career. Kant had a very organised and clockwork life - his habits were so regular that it was considered that the people of Konigsberg could set their clocks by his walks. The same regularity was part of his publication history, until 1770, when Kant had a ten-year hiatus in publishing. This was largely because he was working on this book, the 'Critique of Pure Reason'.
Kant as a professor of philosophy was familiar with the Rationalists, such as Descartes, who founded the Enlightenment and in many ways started the phenomenon of modern philosophy. He was also familiar with the Empiricist school (John Locke and David Hume are perhaps the best known names in this), which challenged the rationalist framework. Between Leibniz' monads and Hume's development of Empiricism to its logical (and self-destructive) conclusion, coupled with the Romantic ideals typified by Rousseau, the philosophical edifice of the Enlightenment seemed about to topple.
Kant rode to the rescue, so to speak. He developed an idea that was a synthesis of Empirical and Rationalist ideas. He developed the idea of a priori knowledge (that coming from pure reasoning) and a posterior knowledge (that coming from experience) and put them together into synthetic a priori statements as being possible.
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Format: Paperback
Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) is considered one of the giants of philosophy, of his age or any other. It is largely this book that provides the foundation of this assessment. Whether one loves Kant or hates him (philosophically, that is), one cannot really ignore him; even when one isn't directly dealing with Kantian ideas, chances are great that Kant is made an impact.
Kant was a professor of philosophy in the German city of Konigsberg, where he spent his entire life and career. Kant had a very organised and clockwork life - his habits were so regular that it was considered that the people of Konigsberg could set their clocks by his walks. The same regularity was part of his publication history, until 1770, when Kant had a ten-year hiatus in publishing. This was largely because he was working on this book, the 'Critique of Pure Reason'.
Kant as a professor of philosophy was familiar with the Rationalists, such as Descartes, who founded the Enlightenment and in many ways started the phenomenon of modern philosophy. He was also familiar with the Empiricist school (John Locke and David Hume are perhaps the best known names in this), which challenged the rationalist framework. Between Leibniz' monads and Hume's development of Empiricism to its logical (and self-destructive) conclusion, coupled with the Romantic ideals typified by Rousseau, the philosophical edifice of the Enlightenment seemed about to topple.
Kant rode to the rescue, so to speak. He developed an idea that was a synthesis of Empirical and Rationalist ideas. He developed the idea of a priori knowledge (that coming from pure reasoning) and a posterior knowledge (that coming from experience) and put them together into synthetic a priori statements as being possible.
Read more ›
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If you are going to read this text, you should just get the complete text, because otherwise, you may be missing the one part that will really be of interest to you.
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Reading this book alongside studying philosophy has greatly helped, although some of Kant's ideas are now outdated i.e. his views on space and time with the discovery of Non-Euclidean Geomentry. Kant forms the basis of most philosophy and therefore shouldn't be overlooked just because the text is difficult. Nevertheless an interesting, captivating and rather hard going read. Well worth it if you feel up to the struggle.
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Good translation of a must read book
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Kant is a brilliant systematist. His philosophy is profoundly rooted in an intense inquiry into the way we precieve reality and make judgements upon these impressions. He is a bit off skew but a must read. He is excruciatingly logical; a bit verbose but his logic is a thing of beauty.
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