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  • Criterion Collection: Red Beard [DVD] [1965] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]
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Criterion Collection: Red Beard [DVD] [1965] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]


Price: £20.10
Only 1 left in stock.
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Region 1 encoding. (requires a North American or multi-region DVD player and NTSC compatible TV. More about DVD formats)
Note: you may purchase only one copy of this product. New Region 1 DVDs are dispatched from the USA or Canada and you may be required to pay import duties and taxes on them (click here for details) Please expect a delivery time of 5-7 days.
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Criterion Collection: Red Beard [DVD] [1965] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC] + Yojimbo [1961] [DVD] + Rashomon [1950] [Special Edition] [DVD]
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Product details

  • Language: Japanese
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 2.35:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: Unrated (US MPAA rating. See details.)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000067IY6
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 139,090 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Customer Reviews

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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Brett Evans on 1 Nov. 2003
Format: VHS Tape
Red Beard (1965) is arguably Kurosawa's most humane film, and his probing of the human condition is at its most thorough. Set at the end of the Tokugawa period, a young man learns that he is to work as an intern at a public clinic in the slums of Edo, instead of the court medical staff to which he had aspired. He rebels by refusing to wear a uniform and by purposely breaking the hospital rules. The head of the clinic, Kyojo Niide (aka Red Beard) played by the great Toshiro Mifune, brings the young intern round after an insane patient attempts to murder him. It is Red Beard's hard-nosed thesis of the patient's condition that impresses him, and it is from here that he begins to take up his duties with sincerity, and face the degredation of the city's slums.
Laced with three-dimensional characters, and dialogue that eschews sentimentality, this is an epic concerning the human condition, and was sadly the last film that Kurosawa and Mifune would make together.
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34 of 36 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 26 Dec. 2003
Format: DVD
This is not, of course, the “Chinese” version (meaning the cheap Hong Kong version of the film, which is a sub-standard English translation of a Chinese translation of the original Japanese). This BFI edition of Red Beard comes with an excellent English subtitle translation, though minus the informative Stephen Prince commentary that graced the US Criterion release.
The film? Red Beard belongs in the short-list of Kurosawa masterpieces alongside Seven Samurai, Rashomon, Throne of Blood and Ikiru. In many ways it is the crowning achievement of one of the most fruitful director-star partnerships in cinema history. The great Toshiro Mifune plays the eponymous hero: a humanitarian doctor managing a clinic committed to the treatment of the poor. His charge becomes the education of a freshly graduated doctor, initially drawn to the wealthy, in whom he instils an understanding of the limits of medical knowledge and the importance of compassion. Thus it is another Kurosawa film about a master and pupil, this time with Death itself as the adversary against which the heroes battle. Astonishing attention to detail, – the period setting is fastidiously recreated – first-rate performances, and a director working at the peak of his powers. Strange to think that the breaking of the partnership would usher in a long period of doubt and artistic uncertainty for the master.
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Trevor Willsmer HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on 18 Jun. 2006
Format: DVD
Red Beard was Kurosawa and Mifune's last collaboration, and it's not hard to see why the actor parted ways with his sensei even if the shoot hadn't dragged on for two years (during which time Kurosawa insisted he keep his beard, preventing him from taking other roles). Although it's not a bad film, Mifune is required more as a presence than an actor. Instead the focus is on Yuzo Kayama's arrogant young doctor furious at being assigned to a slum area hospital and his journey from pride to service.

In many ways it feels remarkably similar to The Cardinal, with even Masaru Sato's excellent score sharing much of the flavor of Jerome Moross' score for the Preminger film, albeit with a much more strident counterpoint in the final cue that stakes the films claim to militance over reverence. It's a heartfelt and humane film, but it tends to wander more towards soap opera as it moves unhurriedly to its foregone conclusion. That said, the totally gratuitous fight scene IS fun.

The BFI's DVD release offers nothin substantial in the way of special features, but does offer a good 2.35:1 transfer, although it is irritating that the subtitles are laid over the picture rather than set against the black border.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Robhin on 17 Feb. 2011
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Watching Red Beard is a deep meditating experience about human fragility, solidarity, commitment without naïveté. It shows an existentialistic view on the human condition through zen-buddhistic eyes without being complex. It 's made in a fascinating cinematographic formula they don 't create anymore, using a very 'patient' camera wich makes you observe people in detail. The sets and the environmental elements (light, darkness, rain, snow, water, dust, ...) 'colour' what happens. The acting is very convincing. If you 're looking for a movie to boost you mental, human battery watch Read Beard!
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7 of 10 people found the following review helpful By "howellzuk" on 1 July 2004
Format: DVD
I had doubts about buying this before some of his other works as I(stupidly) doubted whether this was one of his best purely because it's nowhere near as talked about as such Kurasawa classics as Seven Samurai or Yojimbo. I can safely say though to anyone who has the same doubts that I had that this along with Throne of Blood and Ikiru is, in their own ways every bit as strong as the former and in my opinion better than the latter, which is still brilliant. OK, admittedly Seven Samurai is probably the most special of the Kurasawa films I've seen(only 7 thus far) but the director was also at the peak of his powers with the three I just mentioned. It's so poetic in it's vision that I'd certainly say it's the most beautiful film I've seen by Kurasawa. Favourite bit has to be the part where Sahachi in flashback mode explains the skeleton buried by his workshop. Cinema at it's most beautiful. Probably the most surprising thing of all though is the picture quality. I mean lord it's a miracle. BFI have actually realeased a classic with a good picture, unlike the other films I have bought by their company, especially Yojimbo which is treated shockingly bad. One of the masters definitive masterpieces.
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