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Crime Novels: American Noir of the 1930s and 40s Vol 1 (Library of America) Hardcover – 1 Sep 1997


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Crime Novels: American Noir of the 1930s and 40s Vol 1 (Library of America) + Crime Novels: American Noir of the 1950s Vol 2 (Library of America)
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Product details

  • Hardcover: 990 pages
  • Publisher: The Library of America; First Printing, Slight Moisture Damage edition (Sep 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1883011469
  • ISBN-13: 978-1883011468
  • Product Dimensions: 20.8 x 13.5 x 3.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 725,220 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 30 Nov 1997
Format: Hardcover
Thoroughly enjoyed the collection. Having already read the Cornell Woolrich story I found the others to be very enjoyable. Of the stories listed I would rank The Big Clock as the lesser. Nightmare Alley was probably my favorite. I commend Library of America for publishing these together and giving crime noir it's deserved attention. Can't wait to read the second volume.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 25 May 1999
Format: Hardcover
It's so great to see all these rare crime novels put back into the print they so richly deserve. Most of these novels prove the genre should never die. Cain's THE POSTMAN ALWAYS RINGS TWICE is a masterpiece, and worth the price alone as far as I'm concerned.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 11 Oct 1997
Format: Hardcover
It's nice to see the old masters of noir writing finally getting mainstream recognition, and it's nice to see the respected and literary Library of America come out with a two volume set of classic American crime novels. It's hard to argue with editor Polito's taste: Thompson, Woolrich, McCoy, Highsmith, and Himes all are represented. They even reprint the classic carny novel "Nightmare Alley," out of print for too long. Yet, as wonderful as this collection is, it could have been much better. "I Married a Dead Man" is one of Cornell Woolrich's best books, true, but it's also one of the scant two of his novels that is currently in print, available at bookstores everywhere courtesy of Penguin Books. How about including one of his out of print masterpieces instead, maybe "The Night Has a Thousand Eyes", or "The Bride Wore Black"? And there are dozens of out of print crime novels more worth reprinting then Kenneth Fearing's overrated "The Big Clock." Despite these minor complaints, a solid collection.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 20 reviews
61 of 70 people found the following review helpful
Noir, Baby!!! 9 Nov 2001
By Jeffrey Leach - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
The Library of America is a first-class organization. The LOA is consistently reprinting volumes of literary achievement by the most notable authors in American history. They have reprinted everything from political speeches to poetry to historical works. This volume is the first in a two volume set dedicated to American noir stories. The stories in this book were written in the 1930's and 1940's in what seems to be the golden age of the genre.
The first story is from James Cain, and it's a whiz-bang of a tale. I had heard of "The Postman Always Rings Twice" before, mainly in reference to the two film versions of the story. This is one dark read. Adultery and murder never seem to mix, and it sure doesn't here, either. Told in first person narration, a drifter gets himself mixed up with a washed up beauty queen who is tired of her Greek husband. The result is classic noir: a conspiracy to murder the poor schmuck and run off together. As usual, the murder brings about tragic consequences. This story has more twists and turns than you can imagine. The ending is especially atmospheric. This is certainly one of the best stories in the book. I always like to see a story where the blackmailer gets a good beating.
Horace McCoy's "They Shoot Horses, Don't They?" is next in line. This is another great tale that was made into a film in the 1960's starring Hanoi Jane Fonda and Gig Young. The movie is soul shattering, with depictions of dehumanization in the neighborhood of "Schindler's List." The story is not quite as good, but it still packs a heck of a punch. The story is set in Depression-era America and depicts the horrors of a dance marathon. These marathons were apparently quite popular during the 1930's, until they were ultimately outlawed. Contestants were required to dance for hundreds of hours with only ten minute breaks every two hours. The couple that lasted the longest won a thousand or so dollars. The public would come and pay admission to watch this sorry spectacle. It's like poking sticks at animals in a cage. This story is loaded with dark depression and sexual innuendo. The conclusion is suitably depressing to merit a noir award.
"Thieves Like Us" was pretty substandard when compared to the other stories in this book. This one really didn't seem to have those noir elements that I like so much. Actually, it's more of a Bonnie and Clyde type story. A penitentiary break leads to a crime spree across Texas. Banks are robbed and cops are killed while the gang lives on the lam. A relationship between Bowie, the main character, and a girl named Keechie really doesn't add much interest to the story. There is some good dialogue and a bit of desolate atmosphere, but not enough to lift this to the level of noir. I don't know why this story is included here. Try and guess how the story ends (the clue is "Bonnie and Clyde"). I hope that Edward Anderson's other stories are better.
Kenneth Fearing's "The Big Clock" is excellent, and brings the level of the book back up to where it should be. Set in a magazine publishing house, this tale is sleek and smart. The story is told in first person narration, but Fearing shifts the narration to various characters in the story. These constantly changing viewpoints turn the story into a roller coaster ride of epic proportions. An editor at the company makes the mistake of sleeping with the boss's woman. When this lady turns up dead at the hands of same boss, all heck breaks loose. This story is riveting and has a great ending that is all suspense. A must read.
William Lindsay Gresham wrote "Nightmare Alley" after some discussions he had with some carnival workers. This story is the longest one in the book and is a decent addition to the volume. Full of unpleasant images of murder, swindle, cynicism and downright perversion, you won't be disappointed when this one comes to an end. A scheming magician decides to take his con to the big time by posing as a Spiritualist minister, and as usual, the end result is tragedy all around. This story is downright depressing, and if you don't feel sorry for Gyp, you have got a problem. I didn't really care too much for the (...) addition of the black Communist towards the end of the book. Gresham had a flirtation with the Redski movement, so this apparent insertion makes some sense in that context. It goes nowhere in the story, however. There are some other holes in the plot but overall this is an entertaining story.
The final tale comes from the sumptuous pen of Cornell Woolrich. "I Married a Dead Man" becomes instantly familiar within a few pages, mostly due to the numerous films that have copped the plot. The writing here is far superior to any of the other stories in the book. I'd say it's far superior to most writing in general. The metaphors are extraordinary. Look for the description of Bill lighting his cigarette in the doorway. Wow! The story centers on a case of mistaken identity with a strong dose of blackmail thrown in for good measure. Of course, there's also a murder. This story is outstanding.
Overall, if you are just starting to read noir, start with these two volumes. It is good to see some of the best noir has to offer, and you will find some of it in these pages. The book clocks in at 990 pages, but it reads really fast. There is also a nice summary concerning the careers of each author at the back of the book. Recommended.
17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
Hard Boiled As High Brow Lit? 3 May 2002
By Tribe - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
It's welcome recognition of the rich body of American noir writing that the Library of America has decided to gather these novels and include them in it's collection. This volume, along with it's companion, "Crime Novels: American Noir of the '50s", is perhaps the definitive collection of this genre. While this volume is not as strong as the second volume collecting hard boiled writing from the '50s, it more than makes up for it with the inclusion of two seminal novels from the genre: "The Postman Always Rings Twice" and "They Shoot Horses Don't They?" The themes that would be later expanded on by Jim Thompson, Charles Willeford, et al. are here: the uncertainty of reality, the indifference of fate, the allegories on the disfunction of mercantilist capitalism, the femme fatale as deus ex machina, the erosion of moral standards...themes that are that much more relevant today.
It's comforting in a way that these novels, which were considered (and still considered by some) as trash, disposable items of consumption, are collected along with the novels of Melville, James and Hawthorne...."elevated" to high brow lit.
Perhaps the original authors of these masterworks would disagree on the modern critical re-assessment, but to readers like myself, it's just confirmation of something we've known ever since we first discovered them.
20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
A Real Discovery: 4 or 5 of these make amazing reading 22 Jan 2005
By P. Kufahl - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This is an impressive collection of early and now scarce Noir novels. "The Big Clock" and "Nightmare Alley" are particularly hard to find outside of this volume.

Cain's "The Postman Always Rings Twice" was probably the first crime novel I ever really got into, and it's a stunning departure from Agatha Christie-style mysteries. So much happens in this short book (as turns of plot, but also development of character) that it compares favorably to the first half Camus' "The Stranger." The drifter plumbs the depths of his desperation in a brutal attachment to another man's wife: it's not greed or lust that drives him, but a base need for someone to whom he can anchor himself. A raw and amazing experience, unmatched by anything else of Cain's.

McCoy's "They Shoot Horses, Don't They?" is impressively vivid. I had no idea these dance-hall marathons took place before reading this story. This circus of exploitation of young and apparently desperate people certainly makes for excellent Noir. One of these benefits of reading these novels is the unearthing of buried episodes in America's past.

"Thieves Like Us" has been reviewed here as the weaker end of the collection, and I have to agree. It's still a very capable story of outlaws; and the stoicism of the young people caught up in the criminal's lives is admirably depicted here. I recommend reading Andersen's novel before the others (it's still definitive Noir), so one can more easily avoid expectations built up by the Cain and McCoy.

"The Big Clock" is interesting in the depiction of power relationships between employer and employee, and the shifting first-person style of telling the story works here. I never heard of Fearing before reading this novel, but he evidently had a deep understanding of the motivations of very different kinds of people. This novel has the most suspense of the collection, and is a great and sophisticated read.

The most surprising and bizzare novel is "Nightmare Alley," a strange and memorable journey of an aspiring carnival charlatan. It defines Sleaze. The longest and most complex novel, it feels like a long-lost classic that's been hidden away because of its disturbing content. Some may think of it as too long, but the twisting journey through sweaty farming towns, railroad stations and addled big-city martiarchs required time to establish some crediblity: by the end, I was convinced that such a grotesque collection of stunts actually belonged in the story of this country. "Nightmare Alley" alone is worth the price of the book. Fans of Tarot might be a little offended, but this is especially recommended for understanding fans of Ray Bradbury.

Finally, "I Married a Dead Man" by Woolrich is a suspense novel set up by a tragic accident. The protagonist, literally and figuratively hungry, siezes the opportunity to substitute herself into a more fortunate woman's life. Excellently done, and more grounded in comparison to "Nightmare Alley."

Overall, there's no legitimately weak entry in this collection. The variety of content in these novels is enormous, and acquiring this book will allow the reader to experience the different flavors of American Noir. Most modern crime/suspense movies will seem ridiculous by comparison.
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
Nihilistic Noir: or "In the end, everything turns out bad." 18 July 2001
By David M. Elder - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I was surprised at how modern the themes and writing of this compendium were. I read "Thieves Like Us" just when the Texas 7 episode was happening and was amazed at how little the views of crime and punishment, justice and desperation have changed since that writing, especially in Texas where the story takes place.
"They Shoot Horses..." was my favorite of the bunch for it's depiction of deperate people doing desperate things to survive in the form of a Dance Marathon. But are they doing this out of deperation (even the winner of the prize money, after months of physical torment , will end up having made less than a dollar a day)? Or becuase there is nothing else to do? What is futile and what is meaningfull, the story seems to be asking.
"Nightmare Alley" brought the Tyrone Power movie back home, only the ending seems more poignant. The author organzies each chapter along the 22 minor arcana of the Tarot, a device used by later authors like Robert Anton Wilson and Umberto Eco.
"The big clock", filmed at least twice with variations on themes, uses a unique writing style of shifting narratives from the main characters' points of view and has an awfully modern motive for the murder (probably a little too modern for that period).
"The Postman.." and "I Married a Dead Man" story were also very dood. The Noir theme of "Crime Does Not Pay" runs through most of theses stories, but when you read them, you realize that it's not as simple as that. In the end, who really wins and loses and does it matter?
I don't think one can do better for reading the greats of American Literature than through the Library of America seri
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
A great idea, but could be better 11 Oct 1997
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
It's nice to see the old masters of noir writing finally getting mainstream recognition, and it's nice to see the respected and literary Library of America come out with a two volume set of classic American crime novels. It's hard to argue with editor Polito's taste: Thompson, Woolrich, McCoy, Highsmith, and Himes all are represented. They even reprint the classic carny novel "Nightmare Alley," out of print for too long. Yet, as wonderful as this collection is, it could have been much better. "I Married a Dead Man" is one of Cornell Woolrich's best books, true, but it's also one of the scant two of his novels that is currently in print, available at bookstores everywhere courtesy of Penguin Books. How about including one of his out of print masterpieces instead, maybe "The Night Has a Thousand Eyes", or "The Bride Wore Black"? And there are dozens of out of print crime novels more worth reprinting then Kenneth Fearing's overrated "The Big Clock." Despite these minor complaints, a solid collection.
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