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Crazy Horse: The Strange Man of the Oglalas (Bison Book) Paperback – 1 Jun 1992


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Product details

  • Paperback: 428 pages
  • Publisher: Bison Books; New edition edition (1 Jun. 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0803292112
  • ISBN-13: 978-0803292116
  • Product Dimensions: 20.2 x 13.5 x 2.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 242,455 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

"Here is a glorious hero tale told with beauty and power ... the story of a great American."--John G. Neihardt, New York Times. "[One] of the great stories of the West, and written...in the spirit of the sages, with a scrupulous regard for truth and history."--Atlantic Monthly. "This history of the Oglala Indian Crazy Horse is a splendidly done thing. [Sandoz] gives a magnificent picture of the Plains Indian civilization."--Washington Star.

About the Author

This edition, published on the fiftieth anniversary of the book's original publication, carries an introduction by Stephen B. Oates, the well-known biographer of Abraham Lincoln, Martin Luther King Jr., and others.

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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 17 Sept. 1998
Format: Paperback
This is probably the most comprehensive biography of an Indian leader that I have ever read. The research is painstaking. The book was written in novel form and makes for an excellent read. Although there are no pictures of Crazy Horse, Ms Sandoz' first hand information from people who knew him creates an indelible snapshot of the man. He was a mystic, a visionary, a defender of his people, a modest man, who wore no fancy regalia, who never bragged after he had accomplished something great. His own people were ambivalent about him, and called him the Strange One or the Silent One. Moreover, he had fair complexion with light hair and brown eyes. He wanted desperately for his people to speak with one mind and with one heart. But the divisions within the Lakota people were simply too strong. What is most interesting is the tension between Crazy Horse and Red Cloud. Red Cloud is not painted in a positive light in this book. He is shown as petty, jealous and desperate to show up Crazy Horse. Wherein Crazy Horse was a 'natural' at everything he did, it was not so with Red Cloud who was forced to live under the specter of Crazy Horse's natural aptitude, particularly in matters of war. As a matter of fact he was one of the Lakota that held Crazy Horse down when he was fatally stabbed in 1877 by a white guard at Fort Robinson (Crazy Horse's vision as a young boy had prophesized his murder at the hands of his own people). Red Cloud is much lauded for being the only Native American to beat the cavalry soundly (Fetterman fight). In fact, it was the brilliant strategist Crazy Horse that won that fight. He had learned the ways of the white man in terms of war tactics and applied them brilliantly.Read more ›
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 21 Sept. 1998
Format: Paperback
For two years in college, I studied with Stephen B. Oates, who wrote the Foreword to this edition. An award-winning biographer of Lincoln, King, Nat Turner, John Brown, and others, Oates often told his classes that in his opinion, Mari Sandoz's Crazy Horse was the best biography ever written. His chief reason was Ms. Sandoz's ability to make the reader feel as though he or she is in the actual time and place where Crazy Horse lived, and the quality and style of her language, which has the feel of an oral history told by an Oglala elder at a ritual ceremony. I first read the book in Oates' class in 1985 then recently bought the newer edition with his contribution and read it again. Oates is a very wise man (and an extraordinary writer himself!).
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 24 Nov. 1998
Format: Paperback
I read this book some days ago, and I am deeply impressed on both the life of Crazy Horse and the way Ms. Sandoz told it to the reader. Since long I have been reading books about Plains Indians and their wars and had a special interest in the person of Crazy Horse. But I had not expected that this strange man, hardly to be understood by his own people, would have become so vivid to me. Ms. Sandoz book is by far better than that of Stephen E. Ambrose who often quoted her, because unlike him she was able to tell it from the Indian point of view and did not always evaluate what she wrote about. Crazy Horse was an Indian hero as out of a Greek tragedy alway doing the best for his people but condemned to be beaten by unmeasureably stronger forces than those of his people. I think he will keep in my heart and brain.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 10 May 1998
Format: Paperback
as a 50 year old man i was brought up thinking that indians were merely killers who took joy in killing any white man they found for no particular reason. after all that is what our school books ( at least back then ) and the movies said they were like. but after reading this factual book about the greatest warrior of the lakota, i have to say i was suprised to find that these people were not the same as i read about and saw on the movie screen. it gives one some insight into what they were really like. the way they lived, interacted with each other &other indians, fought, and died for what they believed. it tells about a great man who gave all for his people, and how he and the people lived in a time when the white man was pushing west. in my opinion i would say this book is more accurate than most of the books i have read on the subject. it gives one a feeling you are there experiencing what was happening at the time, and the fear and joy crazy horse and his people felt. it also shows that these people were not blood thirsty like we were led to believe, but human beings just like everyone else. with that , one can see why they did some of the things they had to do to survive. if you want to know what it was like to be an indian in the mid 1800"s or want to know what a real warrior was like read this book
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 22 Aug. 1999
Format: Paperback
I am normally the type of person who has no patience for epic tales. When an author gets too long winded, I jump to the end.
However, this book has the rhythm and impact of a well told story. No one can really say how historically accurate the book is, but it as close to hearing the saga Crazy Horse told as his peers would have told it as the English language allows.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 14 Dec. 1998
Format: Paperback
I have lived in Nebraska and Wyoming all of my life and currently enjoy hunting the same lands as Crazy Horse. I first read this book in 1974 during the uprising on the Pine Ridge Reservation. I have since then stood at the site where Fetterman was killed and other areas that Crazy Horse and his people lived and died. I have read the book two more times. The last being this summer.The book moved me as a teen and still today. I have used it as a lesson for myself to be tolerant of other societys. Another book of intrest is The Killing of Custer. In this book it further talks about how Crazy Horse saw the end of his people by accepting hand outs from the goverment.
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