Buy Used
£0.01
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This book is in very good condition and will be shipped within 24 hours of ordering. The cover may have some limited signs of wear but the pages are clean, intact and the spine remains undamaged. This book has clearly been well maintained and looked after thus far. Money back guarantee if you are not satisfied. See more of our deals.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Crash: Ten Easy Ways to Avoid a Computer Disaster Hardcover – 2 Jun 1997


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£125.65 £0.01


Product details

  • Hardcover: 432 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Ltd; 1st ed 1st printg edition (2 Jun. 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0684816881
  • ISBN-13: 978-0684816883
  • Product Dimensions: 23.6 x 16.2 x 4.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 853,540 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Martin P. Alexander on 1 July 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book is still essential reading for anyone interested in where all the money gets wasted in big IT projects. Governments are the best at wasting money this way but I am sure the private sector is happily shoveling cash down the toilet also.

What you learn from this book is this. Don't be over ambitious in project scope. Don't get 'lost in showbiz' and let pride conceal truth, and be very suspicious of proud people who wont listen. Presume nothing, there is no such thing as a stupid question. Suspect anyone who can not provide simple answers to simple questions. Be brave enough to speak out and promote those who are equally as brave. Suspect the worse when the project becomes more like a religion than a good idea. Take nothing said at face value, if it sounds like BS it is BS. Don't use consultants unless you have specific and limited things for them to do and NEVER rely on them to have sole responsibility to deliver the majority of the project. They have no interest in the future of your business. Decide what you want early and stick to it. Limit yourself to what the system can do, don't tailor the requirements excessively to your needs, change your working practices and not the system where at all possible, and have rigid change control. Hide nothing and be open and transparent about everything. Have clear lines of responsibility throughout the project and make sure management is consistent throughout the project. Accept some defeats and don't sack the manager too quickly. And above all else, DON'T INVOLVE LAWYERS. EVER. FOR ANYTHING.

Now if you find a project which has three or more of the above qualities, it is a dead duck. Kill it before it kills your business. You have been warned.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Steve Campbell on 20 Sept. 1999
Format: Hardcover
This book is an entertaining read which manages to demonstrate many of the factors that will lead to a projects failure. Having read it, I can look back at projects I have been involved in, and see how they could have been done better. Now I know what to watch for!
Essential reading.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By R. Holden on 5 Feb. 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
As someone who worked on computer systems from graduation in 1964 until retirement in 2004, I loved this book from the time it was published. My 30 year old son is now involved, as an "involved user" in his first computer project and it is a biggy; so I was pleased that I could source him a 2nd-hand copy via Amazon. It is still highly relevant.
Tony Collins is still an incisive writer here:[...]
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on 15 Mar. 2004
Format: Paperback
I must admit that being in "the industry" is the main reason why I bought this book. I was also pleased to see that someone had finally put down on paper some of the issues which seem to plague the IT business. That said however it did take me two attempts to successfully complete the journey from cover to cover. There are numerous reasons for this.
While the authors break the chapters up, seemingly, according to topic they never seem to actually focus on the intended topic (and in a few cases, spread the "topic" over three or more chapters e.g. the "Lawyers" chapters). In my experience this resulted in a lack of closure on the completion of each chapter (i.e. I found it difficult to answer the question "what have I learned here"). The authors also tend to diverge quite a bit from the points they try to make by going into seemingly extensive discussions regarding the projects reviewed without actually adding any detail (the realtively short bibliography at the back of the book is further testament to this). This is most evident in one of the last chapters which covers 5 steps to follow in order to avoid the common pitfalls - I'm still not sure what the five steps are. In fact, if it wasn't for the fact that the points they were trying to make were in bold, I might have missed them all together.
Being a technical person I also found the format too literary and lacking in detail (i.e. what hardware was used, what software was used - something which the authors themselves acknowledge as being important). I suspect that this may have something to do with the fact that the authors are trade journalists and do not necessarily have first hand experience of what goes into a software development project.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 25 Oct. 1999
Format: Paperback
The book brings to life many of the largest computer project disaters that we read fleetingly in the press. As a systems implementer in a large multi-national business I have seen almost all of the deadly sins enacted in real life, and I'll add, contributed to a few in my naïvity.
The main messages appear to be: do it in stages, make sure end-users have a say but in a controlled way, prototyping is a good way to introduce new concepts, the developers should really understand the business before beginning and the business shoud be re-organised BEFORE IT is concidered.
All the above form the basis of a development methodology called DSDM (Dynamic Systems Development Method) that is gaining in acceptance throughout Britain and Europe. Maybe there is a hope for the future.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
The two authors provide a revealing account of things that have gone wrong in the computer industry. Millions of pounds of public money are wasted on huge IT projects which are sometimes unsuccesful. Nobody is held accountable. David Bicknell, a journalist on a leading British computer magazine, and his co-author ought to lauded for such a lucid and eye-opening book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback