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Sky Coyote (Company Novel) Paperback – 27 Nov 2007

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Product details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Tor; 1st Trade Pbk. Ed edition (27 Nov. 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0765317486
  • ISBN-13: 978-0765317483
  • Product Dimensions: 14 x 1.8 x 21.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,047,377 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

"Baker's second instalment in her Company series proves a witty match to In the Garden of Iden... [and a] deliciously wicked platform for satirizing past, present and all-too-likely future human frailties.... Baker nails her 20th-century targets: societal, religious and oh-so-personal hypocrisy."-Publishers Weekly on Sky Coyote"

About the Author

Kage Baker lives in Pismo Beach, California.

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YOU'LL UNDERSTAND THIS story better if I tell you a lie. Read the first page
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By John M. Ford TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 4 Jun. 2011
Format: Paperback
Fans of In the Garden of Iden, Kage Baker's previous novel in the Company series, will not be disappointed by Joseph and Mendoza's next assignment together in the new world. Set nearly a half century later, this story finds Joseph newly reassigned to the hidden South American base where Mendoza has been quietly doing botany. After several weeks enjoying the amenities of this Company town, they depart for the field. Their assignment: Relocate the Native American Chumash tribe before their culture is contaminated by colonizing Europeans.

Both the main story and the background stories differ in tone from Baker's previous book. Joseph holds center stage as he impersonates Sky Coyote, a Chumash god who must persuade the commercially sophisticated villagers to prepare for a new life in the Company. There is a great deal of on-the-spot myth-making as Joseph builds a bridge between their current beliefs and the Company setting they must become comfortable with. Humor abounds, from slapstick to subtle digs at our own culture.

This lightness contrasts with the darker discoveries we unearth about the Company. Many questions are raised with few satisfying answers. How can tensions be resolved between experienced, immortal Company operatives and relatively field-inexperienced managers from the future? What has happened to all of those disgruntled operatives who have dropped out of sight? And why is there no information from the future beyond 2355? Some of the characters we meet in this book seem to know more than they say about these issues.
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By A Customer on 11 Feb. 1999
Format: Hardcover
Paul McCartney once said that he didn't know where the idea came from that he and John Lennon were anti-money. The two of them, he said, would sit down and "write ourselves a swimming pool". One hopes that Kage Baker is getting considerably more than a swimming pool out of her "Company" novels. The first one--"In the Garden of Iden"-- had it all: neat premise, historical accuracy, interesting characters and an exciting plot. Baker claims to have taught Elizabethan english as a second language, and it showed.
The second novel (of eight? nine?) has the same neat premise, now somewhat stretched, but a dud of a plot and none of the historical interest of the first installment. The entire book would make an interesting chapter, perhaps some kind of flash-back, in a more satisfying novel. The fishy plot involves moving a village of native Americans out of what will become the San Fernando valley to safety in Canada, just ahead of Spaniards, smallpox and slavery. The villagers are an interesting bunch, but they have all the historical verisimilitude of an ABC After-School Special. (The men all talk like land developers and the girls all talk like valley girls! Get the joke? They're the original Californians, ha ha!)
Furthermore, Baker's premise is getting a little shopworn. Throw-away lines from the first book now are now major plot elements. Remember the crack about the "Great Goat Cult" in the first book? I'm sorry to have to tell you this, but it seems that those Goat Cultists are major players. And it's best not to pay very much attention to the time-travel premise as explained here.
When we look back at this series in about ten years, we'll have trouble remembering what the hell the second book was about. It passed the time on a rainy day, and that's enough. "Sky Coyote" is worth a swimming pool. Hopefully the rest of the series will be worth considerably more.
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By A Customer on 5 Feb. 1999
Format: Hardcover
I thoroughly enjoyed Kage Baker's first novel: dramatic, historical, thought-provoking, romantic, even funny. But "Sky Coyote" is better still. This is a darker, more mature work - as befits a tale told from the viewpoint of Joseph, Facilitator and general all-around slimy little guy. The Company is beginning to show feet of clay, and there are hints of huge and far-reaching plots that are definately not to the benefit of either humanity or the immortal Operatives. Ms. Baker's take on human needs, aspirations and machinations shows a wry, tender realism that is much more refreshing than the usual science fiction despair. I especially enjoyed the detailed portrait of the native Chumash as a real people, and as the prototypical Californians: a culture with spas, entertainment, entrepenuers and all the economic glitz now associated with the Golden State. And the plot simply rocks! The cast of characters spans 20,000 years and at least two species of Homo Sapiens. We get a disturbing hint of the evolution of modern humans in general, and of the feckless Mendoza in particular, as she matures into a sort of ecstatic botanist nun under the shadows of the redwoods. Though there are also hints that her passions are only in abeyance ... as they say of Hollywood, I laughed, I cried, I loved it. Read this right away, and pray for more!
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By A Customer on 17 Feb. 1999
Format: Hardcover
Kage Baker's first novel was very good--well-plotted, with a strong main character and a sense of humor. The humor remains in the sequel, but the other elements have weakened. The main character of this novel, Joseph, is not given much to do. He carries out his Company mission, and that's it. The mission itself is not very exciting; they're packing up a village of Native Americans from California to preserve their culture. All in all, there's very little tension or conflict in this novel--Joseph basically does what he's told, and the tribe's removal progresses relatively smoothly.
A hint of what could be a much more interesting entry in the series is given in Joseph's references to his mentor Budu. He rebelled against the Company and seemingly got away. Hopefully, the next novel will shed more light on this character.
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