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No Country for Old Men Paperback – 4 Jan 2008


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Product details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Picador; Film tie-in edition (4 Jan 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9780330454537
  • ISBN-13: 978-0330454537
  • ASIN: 0330454536
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 2 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (130 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 10,570 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Cormac McCarthy was born in Rhode Island. He later went to Chicago, where he worked as an auto mechanic while writing his first novel, The Orchard Keeper. The Orchard Keeper was published by Random House in 1965; McCarthy's editor there was Albert Erskine, William Faulkner's long-time editor. Before publication, McCarthy received a travelling fellowship from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, which he used to travel to Ireland. In 1966 he also received the Rockefeller Foundation Grant, with which he continued to tour Europe, settling on the island of Ibiza. Here, McCarthy completed revisions of his next novel, Outer Dark. In 1967, McCarthy returned to the United States, moving to Tennessee. Outer Dark was published in 1968, and McCarthy received the Guggenheim Fellowship for Creative Writing in 1969. His next novel, Child of God, was published in 1973. From 1974 to 1975, McCarthy worked on the screenplay for a PBS film called The Gardener's Son, which premiered in 1977. A revised version of the screenplay was later published by Ecco Press. In the late 1970s, McCarthy moved to Texas, and in 1979 published his fourth novel, Suttree, a book that had occupied his writing life on and off for twenty years. He received a MacArthur Fellowship in 1981, and published his fifth novel, Blood Meridian, in 1985. All the Pretty Horses, the first volume of The Border Trilogy, was published in 1992. It won both the National Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award and was later turned into a feature film. The Stonemason, a play that McCarthy had written in the mid-1970s and subsequently revised, was published by Ecco Press in 1994. Soon thereafter, the second volume of The Border Trilogy, The Crossing, was published with the third volume, Cities of the Plain, following in 1998. McCarthy's next novel, No Country for Old Men, was published in 2005. This was followed in 2006 by a novel in dramatic form, The Sunset Limited, originally performed by Steppenwolf Theatre Company of Chicago. McCarthy's most recent novel, The Road, was published in 2006 and won the Pulitzer Prize.

Product Description

Review

'...Javier Bardem is an Oscar contender for his chilling performance as an assassin having a very bad hair day' -- Daily Express

'...as a piece of cinema, it is plainly terrific and exactly what the Coen brothers do best.'
-- Evening Standard

'Cormac McCarthy's source novel - first published in 2005 - is so taut and spare and dialogue-centric it's practically a screenplay' -- Evening Standard

'Few writers have captured the grandeur and cruelty of the American frontier more vividly than Cormac McCarthy...' -- The Independent Extra

'It's a taut, thoughtful thriller, with a rampaging psychopath at its dark heart'
-- Sunday Times

'No Country is as close to the much-used word 'masterpiece' as it's possible to get.' -- Daily Mirror

'Rave notices and four Golden globe nominations suggest that the brothers are back in town.' -- Radio Times

'The Coen brothers storm back to form with a nail-bitingly tense adaption of Cormac McCarthy's Tex-Mex thriller' -- Daily Telegraph

'The brothers display their usual visual artistry and sense of rhythm...'
-- Sunday Times

'This outstanding adaptation maturely translates Cormac McCarthy's distinctive, spare, economical prose into its own, absolutely resplendent, cinematic language.' -- Metro

Book Description

Llewelyn Moss, hunting antelope near the Rio Grande, instead finds men shot dead, a load of heroin, and more than $2 million in cash. Taking the money out, he knows, will change everything. But only after two more men are murdered does a victim’s burning car lead Sheriff Bell to the carnage out in the desert, and he soon realizes that Moss and his young wife are in desperate need of protection. One party in the failed transaction hires an ex-Special Forces officer to defend his interests against a mesmerizing freelancer, while on either side are men accustomed to spectacular violence and mayhem. The pursuit stretches along and across the border, each participant seemingly determined to answer what one asks another: How does a man decide in what order to abandon his life? 'This is a monster of a book. Cormac McCarthy achieves monumental results by a kind of drip-by-drip process of ruthless simplicity. It will leave you panting and awestruck' Sam Shepard 'Imagine the Coen brothers doing a self-conscious riff on Sam Peckinpah and filming a fast, violent story about a stone-cold killer, a small-town sheriff and an average Joe who stumbles across a leather case filled with more than $2 million in hot drug money' International Herald Tribune 'A profoundly disturbing and gorgeously rendered novel . . . No Country for Old Men is a page-turner' Washington Post --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Big A on 24 Feb 2008
Format: Paperback
This is a superbly written book with characters that have lives tangibly of their own making. Although a couple of twists are not clearly plotted the story resolves as it should, which may disappoint thrill seekers - but then this book is in part about them and what happens once they crossover into the darkness (for whatever reason) where death reigns supreme. As always I found the author's description of the physical surroundings in which the story unfolds to be peerless, as is his ear for dialog, west Texan though it may be. Highly recommended...
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40 of 42 people found the following review helpful By Mary Whipple HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 19 July 2005
Format: Paperback
Cormac McCarthy's first novel since completing the Border Trilogy in 1998 is a dramatic change of pace. Gone is the focus on the wild Texas plains and the encroachment of civilization. Gone are the lyrical descriptions of wild nature and young love. Gone is the belief that love and hope have a fighting chance in life's mythic struggles. Instead, we have a much darker, more pessimistic vision, set in Texas in the 1980s, a microcosm in which drugs and violence have so changed "civilization" that the local sheriff believes "we're looking at something we really aint even seen before."
Forty-five-year-old Sheriff Ed Tom Bell must deal with the growing amorality affecting his small border town as a result of the drug trade. The old "rules" do not apply, and Bell faces a wave of violence involving at least ten murders. Running parallel with Bell's investigation of these murders is the story of Llewelyn Moss, a resident of Bell's town, who, while hunting in the countryside, has uncovered a bloody massacre and a truck containing a huge shipment of heroin. He has also discovered and stolen a case containing two million dollars of drug money, which results in his frantic run from hired hitmen. Hunting Moss is Anton Chigurh, a sociopathic cartel avenger, a Satan who will stop at nothing, the antithesis of the thoughtful and kindly Bell. A rival hitman named Wells is, in turn, stalking Chigurh.
By far McCarthy's most exciting and suspenseful novel in recent years, the story speeds along, the body count rising in shocking scenes of depravity.
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71 of 75 people found the following review helpful By A. Ross TOP 500 REVIEWER on 15 Jan 2008
Format: Paperback
I'd never read anything by McCarthy before, but am a huge Coen Brothers fan -- so when I learned that their next project was an adaptation of this book, I made a mental note to check it out. Of course, about a year came and went before I actually read it, and by then the movie was in theaters. So the day after finishing the book, I went out and saw the movie, with the result that my impression of the book and the film are completely intermingled in ways I would have a very hard time untangling. That said, the film version is one of the most faithful adaptations I've come across and a very large portion of its brilliance can be directly credited to McCarthy's novel.

Set in the early 1980s in Texas, the story revolves around three men. First is Llewelyn Moss, a rugged, capable Vietnam vet in his late '30s or so, who lives an honest life, likes a good time, has a sense of humor, and is the kind of handy everyman that makes for a good protagonist. The story opens with him out hunting antelope near the Rio Grande. in the course of which he discovers the aftermath of a heroin deal gone bad: several shot up pickups and a lot of dead Mexicans. He also tracks down a case containing several million dollars, and doesn't hesitate to grab it.

The second main character is Sheriff Bell, a rugged, reflective, weary old-timer in whose county the killings occurred. He speaks to the reader directly in monologues throughout the book, tying the country's history of violence to the violence of the story's events as he tries to figure out just what is going on. These can be rather cheesy and hokey at times, but that's part of the point -- their style established the Sheriff's as a man of the past. The future is embodied by the final man in the trinity, Anton Chigurh.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Drifter on 8 Jan 2008
Format: Paperback
This book, though thrilling, is not really a thriller. There is plenty of action but it is not an action adventure. Set in the west but not a western. It's really a comment on American society, its morals and values.
There are three central characters; Llewelyn Moss, who stumbles across a brief case full of money at a place where a big drug deal has gone wrong. Anton Chigurh, a psychotic killer who has an original way of 'solving problems' for you and the reflective Sheriff Bell who makes some very perceptive observations and asks some very pointed questions.
What really makes the book quite special is the way in which the story is told. MaCarthy's style is utterly absorbing if not to say, at times, harrowing. Lyrical and evocative yet sparse. The characters are outstanding and the few plot holes easily overlooked. I'd be surprised if anyony read this and wasn't left unsettled.
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29 of 32 people found the following review helpful By prisrob TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 14 Aug 2005
Format: Hardcover
'It's a mess, aint it Sheriff?' 'If it aint it'll do till a mess gets here.' "Sheriff Bell's deputy says to him. And, yes, what a hell of a mess. 305 pages of a riveting book that I read in almost one sitting. I could not stop reading. The "old man" of the book if there is one, is Sheriff Bell. And his wife, Loretta, is the calming influence. Bell's voice is heard through out this book, in italicized version; we recognize that his down to earth common sense views are sure to calm down the violence that starts on page 4. The first murder, and then the second on page 5 and...
The setting is Texas, and the title of the book may be a simile for what is happening in our world and in Texas. Llewellyn Moss, a young cowboy, who works hard for a living and is out hunting antelope, stumbles upon millions of dollars, drugs and 8 dead men in the Texas desert and highland. He does what many of us would do, he takes the money. He understands that his life will never be the same, but it is worth it, isn't it? Money is trouble and Moss is in for as much trouble as anyone could imagine. He has his wife move from their trailer to her mom's to keep her safe. And, Moss, well Moss goes looking for that trouble. And, Zagnorch? Well, find out for yourself.
The character that I am intrigued with is Anton Chigurh. We meet him via a murder in which Chigurh goes from being handcuffed by a West Texas county deputy to driving away in his patrol car, splattered with blood. The telling of the murder is so gory, your heart stops but for a second. The heartlessness of Chigurh is burned into our memory, he will allow some of his victims to flip a coin for their life, but that is just as grizzly as the murders.
The dignity and honor of Moss is contrasted with the heartlessness of Chigurh.
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