Country Of My Skull and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
  • RRP: £10.99
  • You Save: £2.20 (20%)
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10.
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Country Of My Skull has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Expedited shipping available on this book. The book has been read but remains in clean condition. All pages are intact and the cover is intact. Some minor wear to the spine.
Trade in your item
Get a £0.50
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Country Of My Skull Paperback – 4 Nov 1999


See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£8.79
£5.77 £1.82
£8.79 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Only 3 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • When you trade in £15 or more you’ll receive an additional £5 Amazon.co.uk Gift Card for the next time you spend £10 or more.

Frequently Bought Together

Country Of My Skull + Disgrace
Price For Both: £15.08

Buy the selected items together


Trade In this Item for up to £0.50
Trade in Country Of My Skull for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £0.50, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Paperback: 464 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage; New Ed edition (4 Nov. 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0099289792
  • ISBN-13: 978-0099289791
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 2.9 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 219,760 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Amazon Review

In the year following South Africa's first democratic elections, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission was established to investigate human rights abuses committed under the apartheid regime. Presided over by God's own diplomat, Archbishop Desmond Tutu, the first hearings of the commission were held in April 1996. During the following two years of hearings, South Africans were daily exposed to traumatic revelations and public testimony about their traumatic past, and--like the world that looked on--continued to discover that the relationship between truth and reconciliation is far more complex than they had ever imagined.

Antjie Krog, a prominent South African poet and journalist, led the South African Broadcasting Corporation team that for two years reported daily on the hearings. Like the Truth Commission itself, Krog's Country of My Skull gives central prominence to the power of the testimony of the victims, combining the reportage skills of the journalist with the poet's ability to let previously unheard voices emerge with their stories. Extreme forms of torture, abuse and state violence were the daily fare of the Truth Commission. Many of those involved with its proceedings, including Krog herself, suffered personal stresses--ill health, mental breakdown, dissolution of relationships--in the face of both the relentless onslaught of the truth, and the continuing subterfuges of unrelenting perpetrators.

Krog's painful but precise account captures the essential character of the Truth Commission; that it was not a court convened to expose and punish culpability, but a forum for the new, still deeply divided, nation to bare its soul. Many, including clinical psychologist Nomfundo Walaza have argued that the creation of guilt was not the real purpose of the commission: "In essence we are dealing here with a definition of humanity…whites with their self-centred, selfish, capitalistic character have never been able to fathom the essence of humanity." Trying to fathom the essence of humanity, the depth of the voices of ordinary people, her country, and her self, is at the core of Krog's remarkable and uniquely challenging account. --Rachel Holmes --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"One of the best books of the year" (The Economist)

"No one will tell us more about the struggle for the Afrikaner's soul; for this book, like the events it reports, is an act of redemption" (Daily Telegraph)

"Krog's account of the hearings, which recorded 20,000 statements from victims and nearly 8,000 applications for amnesty, is vivid and impassioned" (Mail on Sunday)

"Whatever it is that makes a major lasting work of non-fiction, it is here" (Observer)

"Her accounts are so powerful, her resilience, humour and compassion so engaging...to have written this book is heroic" (Sunday Times)

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
9
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 11 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 22 Nov. 2003
Format: Paperback
Although this deals with the South African Truth & Reconciliation Commission and contains harrowing personal testimonies of suffering, it is a surprisingly uplifting book. The author, an Afrikaner woman journalist and poet, writes with such sensitivity, intelligence and integrity about her country’s agony and the ways it is reflected in herself. While one is made all too aware of the capacity for evil in ordinary people, stories of courage, steadfastness and devotion to others (not least from Desmond Tutu) are inspiring. It is interesting to compare this experience with that of post-war Germany or the experiences of the Congolese (told vividly in Adam Hochschild: King Leopold’s Ghost) which have never been resolved.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Conway on 3 Dec. 2005
Format: Paperback
It was only when I read 'Country of my Skull' that I truly understood South Africa and reading it whilst living there made the experience of reading Krog's work all the more powerful. Krog writes using a fluid mixture of journalism, direct testimony from the TRC (which Krog interweaves like poetic verse) and some fiction. The book is much more than a historical documentation of the atrocities of apartheid and one gets a real sense of Krog herself exploring her own complicity and guilt.
'Country of my Skull' grapples with the meaning of truth, guilt, reconciliation and forgiveness and does so in a way that will resonate with anyone who wishes to consider these things in relation to their own personal life and social context.
As soon as you start reading this book - you won't put it down and you'll always remember it!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By mary@totem-consultancy.com on 18 May 2001
Format: Paperback
This book is both revelatory and unsurprising... It takes the reader on an incredible journey through the eyes of one whose life bore little resemblance to those it describes. The writer exposes her own emotional history in order to give the reader some context within which to place this book. She writes in a cathartic and journalistic style which seems to mirror the way in which the testimonies to the Truth and Reconciliation were reported by victims and survivors. This is an outstanding, startling, frightening, moving and motivational book. Antje Krog brings into the public domain that which compassion fatigue, guilt and shame have hidden.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By ge.lloyd@virgin.net on 29 Jan. 2001
Format: Hardcover
Reading this book was like being at the hearings but with the bonus of having Krog explaining how and why things were happening. As a journalist her ability to understand what is really happening amidst all of the delays and burocracy takes the reader into the coutrooms. I don't know whether she intends to make you angry at the flaws in the TRC about the enormous requests for forgiveness for such terrible acts, especially when they come from people clearly part of the procedure to appease their own guilt rather than to make a full submission. The capacity to forgive is often beyond me. At the latter part of the book her explanations of the TRC within South African society also serves to clarify many other topical issues related to justice. Her admiration for Bishop Tutu will be shared by all who read this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
This account of the Truth and Reconciliation hearings, and thus South Africa's recent past, brings tears to the eyes in places and at times, I had to close the book to try and absorb the magnitude of the information being relayed by victims and perpetrators. Running alongside these testimonies are the wise and forever positive words of Tutu, but also the author's own poetic and philosophical exploration of the issues raised. The latter were a bit of a sticking point for me; her story seemed quite disjointed and obscure, sometimes completely confusing. But that aside, I was gripped and it's a hard-hitting account.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I thought I remembered those days pretty well but this book has all the insider information and politicking that didn't always get into the international press. Antjie Krog uses spectacular prose to describe the process of forming the Commission and its duration, how it struggled to bring everyone on board and how it had to define and re-define its objectives in the light of obstacles as they arose. An incredibly powerful account of a country trying to come to terms with its past in order to move forward into an inclusive future and the testimonies of the oppressors and oppressed who helped to shape its history.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback