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Corydon Hardcover – Dec 1952


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Hardcover, Dec 1952
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--This text refers to the Paperback edition.


Product details

  • Hardcover: 143 pages
  • Publisher: Martin Secker & Warburg Ltd; First GB Edition edition (Dec. 1952)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0436175002
  • ISBN-13: 978-0436175008
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 3,851,964 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

"Nobel prize winner Gide considered this work his crowning achievement. Published in French in 1925, the book is divided into four 'dialogs' on homosexuality and its place in the world." -- "Classic Returns," Library Journal --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This book consists of four Socratic dialogues on homosexuality. Its name comes from Virgil's pederastic character Corydon. Parts of the text were separately privately printed from 1911 to 1920, and the whole book appeared in its French original in France in May 1924 and in the United States in 1950.

An old school friend visits Corydon, who has become a doctor. He is very slow on the uptake but I suppose that give the author the excuse to go into great detail.

Corydon marshals a range of evidence from naturalists, historians, poets, and philosophers (many from the classics, of which I have virtually no knowledge or interest) to support his contention that homosexuality has pervaded the most culturally and artistically advanced civilizations, that homosexuality is natural, or better not unnatural, and that it pervaded the most culturally and artistically advanced civilizations.

He explains that he was going to marry but fancied her brother who later committed suicide because of his unrequited love for Corydon.

We get lots of information about female animals being on heat and how males can’t help themselves when they smell them whereas human males can choose and the female has to wear make up to attract. Males have more semen that is needed for reproductive purposes so isn’t it natural for them to sow their seed all over the place.
Anti-Semitism dismisses some words of Leon Blum.

Some say that it’s outdated, but the debates contained within it still rage today – is it nature or nurture? So what if animals indulge? Aren’t humans endowed with a higher nature?
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 3 reviews
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
A quick amusing read 23 Aug. 2000
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
A quick, amusing read, but not Gide's best work. The work doesn't have the same subjective character studies I've grown to love, but rather reads like a scientific paper written by a skeptical college student. Nonetheless, it is a landmark work in gay literature and so I gave it 4 stars instead of the 3 it actually earned.
an essentialist view 10 July 2014
By Mr. D. P. Jay - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book consists of four Socratic dialogues on homosexuality. Its name comes from Virgil's pederastic character Corydon. Parts of the text were separately privately printed from 1911 to 1920, and the whole book appeared in its French original in France in May 1924 and in the United States in 1950.

An old school friend visits Corydon, who has become a doctor. He is very slow on the uptake but I suppose that give the author the excuse to go into great detail.

Corydon marshals a range of evidence from naturalists, historians, poets, and philosophers (many from the classics, of which I have virtually no knowledge or interest) to support his contention that homosexuality has pervaded the most culturally and artistically advanced civilizations, that homosexuality is natural, or better not unnatural, and that it pervaded the most culturally and artistically advanced civilizations.

He explains that he was going to marry but fancied her brother who later committed suicide because of his unrequited love for Corydon.

We get lots of information about female animals being on heat and how males can’t help themselves when they smell them whereas human males can choose and the female has to wear make up to attract. Males have more semen that is needed for reproductive purposes so isn’t it natural for them to sow their seed all over the place.
Anti-Semitism dismisses some words of Leon Blum.

Some say that it’s outdated, but the debates contained within it still rage today – is it nature or nurture? So what if animals indulge? Aren’t humans endowed with a higher nature?
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Thesis 21 Mar. 2012
By George Smith - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Two main points in Gide's defense of homosexuality: (1) the sexual instinct is imprecise so the pleasure in coitus is the underlying motivation; (2) homosexuality can be uplifting, capable of virtue, capable of self-denial, courage, chasteness, skill in art.

The moral integrity in Greek art cannot be separate from the Greeks' love for the masculine beauty of man.

220 pages
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