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Copper Sun
 
 

Copper Sun [Kindle Edition]

Sharon M. Draper
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)

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Product Description

Product Description

Stolen from her village, sold to the highest bidder,
fifteen-year-old Amari has only one thing left of her own -- hope.


Amari's life was once perfect. Engaged to the handsomest man in her tribe, adored by her family, and living in a beautiful village, she could not have imagined everything could be taken away from her in an instant. But when slave traders invade her village and brutally murder her entire family, Amari finds herself dragged away to a slave ship headed to the Carolinas, where she is bought by a plantation owner and given to his son as a birthday present.

Survival seems all that Amari can hope for. But then an act of unimaginable cruelty provides her with an opportunity to escape, and with an indentured servant named Polly she flees to Fort Mose, Florida, in search of sanctuary at the Spanish colony. Can the illusive dream of freedom sustain Amari and Polly on their arduous journey, fraught with hardship and danger?

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1570 KB
  • Print Length: 340 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1416953485
  • Publisher: Atheneum Books for Young Readers; Reprint edition (19 Jun 2012)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B007QUOGHK
  • Text-to-Speech: Not enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #81,051 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Courtesy of Teens Read Too 10 Aug 2007
By TeensReadToo TOP 500 REVIEWER
Format:Hardcover
I have been a fan of Sharon M. Draper for some time. She is a master at writing realistic fiction. COPPER SUN is her first historical fiction and it is amazing -- as well as frighteningly authentic.

This book follows the trials and tribulations of Amari, a fifteen-year-old African maiden. After witnessing the slaughter of both the old and young in her African village, including her parents and her young brother, she is chained, by feet, hands, and neck, lined up, and herded miles on foot to the ocean by pale skinned visitors with fire sticks. She watches her fellow Africans suffer incomprehensible humiliation and death at the hands of their captors as they are shipped like animal cargo across the ocean. The life that awaits her is nothing like she could have ever imagined.

Amari must adapt to life as a purchased slave on a rice plantation, a life that includes atrocities committed upon her by her white owners. She meets Polly, an indentured servant who has dreams of making it to the big house and being a fine lady of standing. Instead, Polly lives in the slave quarters and finds she's given the chore of civilizing Amari, now called Myna, and teaching her enough English to work. After witnessing murder, the two girls find themselves thrown together in a desperate run for freedom.

This is not just another book about slavery. This is a book about something real and tangible. Ms. Draper's writing is so vivid that you can smell the rank odors beneath ship. You can feel the pain of being lashed with a whip. Your throat will constrict at the heart-wrenching pain of a mother and child being forced apart. You will also celebrate the strength and spirit of Amari and those she inspires.

COPPER SUN won the Coretta Scott King Award. This is a book I will make sure goes on my classroom shelves. I give COPPER SUN a gold star!

Reviewed by: Cana Rensberger
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5.0 out of 5 stars need a good buy 4 Mar 2014
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
A very good read,makes you stop and realise the injustices some had to endure.A good authoress that makes you feel
you,re watching it happen in front of you.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A...mazing 9 Mar 2013
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
I loved this book...I've been after something like this ever since reading roots...this book could easily be made into a film and I would buy a copy without question...gutted now that I've finished it but detox worth five or even six stars..
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5.0 out of 5 stars Sunrise 6 Nov 2010
By BeatleBangs1964 TOP 1000 REVIEWER
Format:Paperback
Amari, 15 and her younger brother Kwasi enjoy their life in a rural village in Africa. Members of the Ewe tribe, Amari and her family describe the fruits, meats and drum culture that is part of their lives in Africa in 1738.

Amari has been betrothed to Besa, a member of a neighboring tribal village. Kwasi enjoys poking good natured fun at Amari for having a crush and being delighted with her impending match.

The lives of the Africans changes the day the "pale faced strangers" with "skin the color of goat's milk" arrive. Amari, fascinated by people who look so different from any she has ever known is all too eager to spread the word about the villagers. Her father, a kind man welcomes the newcomers with a specially prepared meal and a special drum introduction. Amari and Kwasi help their mother prepare the food. Kwasi especially loves darting about in the forest and climbing trees to gather fruits.

Amari's father, a gifted weaver and story teller regales the newcomers with stories of tribal history. Drum music and dancing ensue and Amari is impressed with her father's facility for langugage.

Drum beats are repaced by gunshots; several of the newcomers shoot the villagers. Several Ashanti members signal to the newcomers to make their move and claim people for slaves. Amari is the only surviving member of her family. She flees into the woods, only to be captured and led in a slave chain. The slave march takes several days.

Once the party reaches the coast, Amari sees the ocean for the very first time. That view is short lived as she and the rest of the captives are forced into a locked hut until a slave ship arrives. Once the ship arrives, the surviving members of that Trail of Tears are boarded below decks, wedged into shelf-like bunks.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.6 out of 5 stars  87 reviews
32 of 35 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A painfully honest novel about slavery in America 16 Feb 2006
By Teen Reads - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
Fifteen-year-old Amari loves life in her home village in Africa. She spends her days strolling along the stream, daydreaming about her handsome future husband, teasing her little brother, and avoiding chores. But everything changes the day the pale-faced visitors arrive.

Everyone contributes for the celebration to welcome the strangers. Amari helps her mother arrange the food, her storyteller father shares his tales, her fiancé plays his drum, and everyone dances. But then their world shatters as the strangers begin killing the adults and young children. Amari stands stunned as her parents drop dead from gunfire. Her little brother urges her to run into the jungle for safety; they try, only for Amari to be captured and her brother to be shot dead.

The nightmare continues as Amari and the other young people find themselves chained together and forced to walk for days. At the coast, Amari views the ocean for the first time and most of her friends for the last time. Packed tightly into ships, Amari's people endure horrific conditions: hunger, thirst, sickness, lying in their own waste, and rape. More die and are tossed overboard, but Amari survives with encouragement from a woman named Afi, who tells Amari that she has to live; Amari has a purpose in life and she must find hope. But hope is the last thing to be found on a slave ship, and that is what Amari has become --- a slave.

Upon arrival in America, Amari is sold to the highest bidder, a rice grower wanting a birthday present for his son. Soon Amari meets Polly, a white girl indentured to the same rice grower. The two girls from different ends of the earth bond together in order to survive, and their friendship just might help them fight their way to freedom.

Sharon Draper is the granddaughter of a former slave, so this tale must hold a special place in her heart. She tells the story of Amari with such powerful description that it almost feels as if the reader was right there in the nightmare. It is so hard to comprehend how humans were once bought, sold, owned, and degraded in a country that stands for freedom. This painfully honest novel brings back the past so that people will never forget.

--- Reviewed by Chris Shanley Dillman, author
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars VEEEEEEEEEEERY Good! 30 Mar 2006
By Royal Avid Reader - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
Copper Sun was an exceptional book. I completely fell in love with it. The characters were well developed, the plot wasn't very predictable, and it gave me a sense of awe and wonder when I finished it. The book is under the genre of historical fiction and is about a 15 year old slave girl who was captured and sold into slavery from her native home in Africa. However, this isn't your typical fly-away-to-freedom slavery book. Amari, the main character, was raped and brutally beaten before she escaped to freedom with her white friend and a young boy. Sharon Draper offers two perspectives-that of Amari and of her white comrad Polly. Ironically instead of escaping to the North, they escape to the South where a non-discriminatory fort exists. There all are free and equal which is extremely uncommon during the year 1738. I won't tell anymore-you have to read it for yourself!
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Courtesy of Teens Read Too 10 Aug 2007
By TeensReadToo - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
I have been a fan of Sharon M. Draper for some time. She is a master at writing realistic fiction. COPPER SUN is her first historical fiction and it is amazing -- as well as frighteningly authentic.

This book follows the trials and tribulations of Amari, a fifteen-year-old African maiden. After witnessing the slaughter of both the old and young in her African village, including her parents and her young brother, she is chained, by feet, hands, and neck, lined up, and herded miles on foot to the ocean by pale skinned visitors with fire sticks. She watches her fellow Africans suffer incomprehensible humiliation and death at the hands of their captors as they are shipped like animal cargo across the ocean. The life that awaits her is nothing like she could have ever imagined.

Amari must adapt to life as a purchased slave on a rice plantation, a life that includes atrocities committed upon her by her white owners. She meets Polly, an indentured servant who has dreams of making it to the big house and being a fine lady of standing. Instead, Polly lives in the slave quarters and finds she's given the chore of civilizing Amari, now called Myna, and teaching her enough English to work. After witnessing murder, the two girls find themselves thrown together in a desperate run for freedom.

This is not just another book about slavery. This is a book about something real and tangible. Ms. Draper's writing is so vivid that you can smell the rank odors beneath ship. You can feel the pain of being lashed with a whip. Your throat will constrict at the heart-wrenching pain of a mother and child being forced apart. You will also celebrate the strength and spirit of Amari and those she inspires.

COPPER SUN won the Coretta Scott King Award. This is a book I will make sure goes on my classroom shelves. I give COPPER SUN a gold star!

Reviewed by: Cana Rensberger
9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Fight for Freedom 17 May 2006
By Teen Reviewer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
This book has a very powerful message to it. This made me think about all the things that I take for granted. With Amari being fifteen, I can relate to her. Usually you can not find books like this now a days. This book makes me think more about how lucky I am and how there are kids in the world that aren't as fortunate as I am. Sharon knows how to grab the readers attention. My friends and I are not big readers and we thought this book was good, and it is one of the very few books that we can stand to read. Drapers knows how to catch your wondering eye because when I saw this book on the amazon website I wanted to read it and I was not really interested in reading any other books.

I recommend this book to all of those people out there that do not like to read. Even though this book is a long one you do not get board with it you are interested with in the very first paragraph and Amari talking about her homeland Africa and about her family.

This book is a good one to read and I hope all of you enjoy my review, and reading this book.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I Cried for Her Loss in Innocence 13 Jun 2007
By Cinda B - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
Powerful, life-changing, and a must read, "Copper Sun" gives a vicarious account of what life must have been like during the slave era.
For Amari, her life in Africa was peaceful and happy until she was kidnapped to be sold as a slave. Upon arriving in America, she was bought as a "birthday present" for the plantations sixteen year old son--what an OUTRAGE! She begins life on the plantation helping cook, among her "duties" for Clay. "Copper Sun" gives insight to the hardships that all slaves endured and this books accounts are heart-wrenching.
This story will keep your adrenaline flowing, at times your eyes crying, and renew your belief in the power of the human spirit--I couldn't put it down--I read it from cover to cover.
Sharon Draper has become my "new" favorite author.
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