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Cook's Journey to Japan: 100 Homestyle Recipes from Japanese Kitchens Paperback – 24 Apr 2014


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More About the Author

http://www.sarahmarxfeldner.com

Sarah Marx Feldner has been in the food business for over 15 years. She started as the early-morning baker at a co-op and is currently Executive Editor for tasteofhome.com.

She obtained a master's in Library and Information Science from the University of Illinois with an emphasis on Culinary Collections and Food Research. While in graduate school, she wrote food reviews for the local weekly and co-hosted a morning radio show.

In addition, Sarah has apprenticed with the nationally known spice family, the Penzey's, and served as Associate Editor for Cuisine at home magazine--where she developed recipes, wrote articles, and assisted with photo shoots. She also worked as a pastry chef and writes a regular food feature for the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.

Sarah has eaten her way through more than ten countries...and counting.

Product Description

Review

"This inviting book is the warmest introduction to Japanese cuisine you could hope to find. Sarah Marx Feldner worked in Japan as an English teacher, but it was the country's food (everyday home-cooked fare, in particular) that captured her attention. Here, she shares her discoveries through charming stories and 100 appealing recipes, such as Crispy Rice Snacks, Soy-Glazed Chicken Wings, Braised Spare Ribs, and Cold Sesame Noodle Salad. Each hunger-inducing recipe is thoughtfully written and most are tantalizingly photographed. And nothing seems too foreign or difficult, which was Feldner's goal. She hoped readers would say, "I can make that!" And you will." --Fine Cooking

"Filled with step-by-step photos to help novices master essential skills, A Cook's Journey to Japan will give readers the courage to try new recipes. Classic dishes include; tori karaage, (Japanese-style fried chicken), age-dashi dofu (deep-fried tofu), and tonjiru (pork miso soup). But it's the non-traditional recipes that really catch the eye, like Japanese "cocktail peanuts" (nuts baked in a sweet miso coating), ginger fried soybeans and daikon salad with a spicy karashi-mentaiko dressing. A Cook's Journey to Japan gathers some of the country's best recipes, and will be a treat for anyone looking to expand their repertoire of Japanese cuisine." --Metropolis

Dozo, meshiagare! (Go ahead, dig in!) Sarah will guide you well." --Elizabeth Andoh

"Filled with step-by-step photos to help novices master essential skills, A Cook's Journey to Japan will give readers the courage to try new recipes. Classic dishes include; tori karaage, (Japanese-style fried chicken), age-dashi dofu (deep-fried tofu), and tonjiru (pork miso soup). But it's the non-traditional recipes that really catch the eye, like Japanese "cocktail peanuts" (nuts baked in a sweet miso coating), ginger fried soybeans and daikon salad with a spicy karashi-mentaiko dressing. A Cook's Journey to Japan gathers some of the country's best recipes, and will be a treat for anyone looking to expand their repertoire of Japanese cuisine." --Metropolis

Dozo, meshiagare! (Go ahead, dig in!) Sarah will guide you well." --Elizabeth Andoh --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Book Description

This book is a user–friendly language guide for basic spoken Japanese.

To effectively learn Japanese and communicate in another culture you need more than the bare bones of the language. You need to understand the given norms of that society, how people interact, how things work, what the system is, how to navigate and manipulate those systems—in short, how to use the language in context. More than a Japanese phrase book, Conversational Japanese provides basic material for practical day-to-day communication. Through hundreds of example sentences and dialogs, as well as thorough explanations of the customs involved, learners will know what to say and do when:
  • Meeting new people.
  • Reserving a hotel room.
  • Buying a train ticket.
  • Offering a gift.
  • Writing emails, business letters, cards and thank-you notes.
This book aims to prepare you for situations you are likely to find yourself in if you go to Japan to visit or to work. Every chapter starts with a short introduction giving background knowledge for that topic; then there are dialogues based on real–life situations which give you you the words and phrases you need to manage a wide range of daily tasks from getting on with the neighbors, to buying a phone, shopping on the internet, sightseeing, visiting clients or giving a speech.

The Japanese language is kept simple and clear and strikes a balance between Japanese textbook language and colloquial Japanese language. Real life Japanese conversations are untidy and elliptical. Unlike most language books, Conversational Japanese does not restrict the use of kanji (Chinese characters), and the sentences are written in the usual Japanese combination of kana (hiragana and katakana) and kanji. Since learning kanji is a difficult task, Conversational Japanese includes romanji (Romanized Japanese) for each word or phrase. As you progress, using kanji and kana will become easier to remember and you should be able to pick up new kanji over time. Soon you your abilities to speak Japanese, comprehend Japanese, read Japanese and write Japanese will be improved.

Inside This Book

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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Amazon.com: 12 reviews
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
Ichiban 19 Jun. 2010
By wogan - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
For those who are adventurous and interested in Japanese cooking this is your cookbook. It presents Japanese home cooking as done in ordinary Japanese homes today. There are lots of pictures, almost every recipe has one and also smaller pictures to illustrate techniques.

There are menu suggestions, a list of resources with their web sites, a map of Japan, an explanation of Japanese tea- green of course and how to brew it.
These are recipes that a westerner might be interested in and the ingredients would be readily available.
There are appealing recipes such as: Japanese egg salad sandwich, sesame fried chicken, soy-glazed chicken wings, oolong tea chiffon cake.
The book contains 100 recipes, including: the basics (fish stock, white rice, sushi rice, etc.), snacks and salads, soups, rice and noodles, poultry and meat, seafood, vegetables and tofu, desserts and drinks.

This is indeed a beautiful book and beyond that instructive, educational and useful.
14 of 17 people found the following review helpful
A bit pandering 23 Sept. 2010
By Gabriel - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
While the recipes in this book are sound, my largest complaint of this book is that they are all quite bland. They are the kind of foods one gets at Benihana when one orders from the menu instead of the Teppanyaki. Its not bad food, just very white bread and butter. The author's recipe descriptions are more bragging about her travels than anything else, not helpful to the recipes in any way. And I just find the whole book to be rather shallow, albeit nicely photographed. If you are looking for Japanese food recipes of any kind, then let Japanese Cooking: A Simple Art be your bible. As for this book, pick it up in a bargain bin, but pay full price for something else.
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
Beautiful Book 16 Jun. 2010
By M. Carson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
My interest in Japanese food comes from having worked in a Japanese restaurant in college. I wanted a recipe for tonkatsu, yakitori, sukiyaki, and sushi, but being unfamiliar with Japanese techniques I need the extra coaching this book provides. Recipes aside, this book is also visually beautiful and interesting to read.
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Beautiful, Education and Practical 8 July 2010
By K. Conrad - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
As a professional food stylist and chef I have a great appreciation for the hard work that goes into producing quality recipes and images that entice the reader while still honestly depicting the dish in question. This book is loaded with gorgeous, honest images and user-friendly recipes --plus tips and tricks to help you get great results.

Sarah Feldner's text is a warm, friendly voice, guiding you through the recipes and their backgrounds. Her enthusiasm for her subject is infectious. The only thing that kept me from reading "A Cook's Journey.." in one sitting was the need to stop reading and start cooking.

Great for cooks at all levels and anyone interested in a glimpse (or a taste) of home-cooking in Japan.

A Cook's Journey to Japan: Fish Tales and Rice Paddies 100 Homestyle Recipes from Japanese Kitchens
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Powerhouse Cookbook 25 Aug. 2013
By Tiffany Case - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I bought this book after meeting the author at a demo. It was a great demo, and she was so incredibly charming, funny, and self-deprecating that I bought the book to support the author and the store where she did the demo. Then it sat on my shelf for years because I was too intimidated by the idea of jumping into a whole new cuisine full of unfamiliar ingredients and techniques.

Boy, am I glad I finally cracked the cover. I've made at least a dozen recipes out of this cookbook so far, and every one of them has turned out great on the first try. The recipe for sesame fried chicken is a huge, huge hit with my family, and it's now part of our regular, weeknight rotation. Sadly, we have no access to good seafood where we live, so I have not tried the seafood recipes (about 15% of the book, maybe?), but the soups, meat dishes, veggies, and noodle dishes we've tried have all been stellar. I bring one of the cold noodle salads to work for lunch almost every week. I even pack onigiri to bring to the zoo for toddler snacks. It's one of those cookbooks that has food stains on the pages because it spends a lot of time in the kitchen, instead of on the coffee table.

One commenter said that the recipes are bland and not the best of Japanese food. Bland I don't agree with. I'm a bit of a food snob, and I thought they were very tasty. Not big, bold flavors, perhaps, but definitely well-balanced, delicious, and somehow wonderfully "homey". I think the cookbook is very much geared towards the Western home cook who wants to try out some everyday Japanese dishes. A lot of the book is "weeknight food," and all of it can be made with ingredients readily available in the US. There's nothing you can't find in a well-stocked grocery store. If you are already well-versed in Japanese cooking, though, or if you are looking for elaborate dishes to wow a dinner party, you might want to try the other cookbooks that the other commenter suggests.

Oh, and I loved the little stories that went with the recipes. The impression I got was not of someone who wanted to brag, but of someone overflowing with gratitude and recognition for her teachers and hosts in Japan. I thought it painted a picture of someone who fell in love with Japanese cuisine and with the people she met in Japan. Still, there's no reason you have to read the stories to make the dishes. There are also helpful notes with each recipe on finding good ingredients and on possible variations.
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