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Contemporary Library Architecture: A Planning and Design Guide Paperback – 17 Apr 2013

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Product details

  • Paperback: 216 pages
  • Publisher: Routledge (17 April 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0415592305
  • ISBN-13: 978-0415592307
  • Product Dimensions: 27.4 x 21.8 x 1.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 77,924 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

More About the Author

Ken Worpole is the author of many books and studies on architecture, landscape and urban design, and adviser on public policy to the UK government, the Commission for Architecture and the Built Environment, and the Heritage Lottery Fund. He is a Senior Professor at The Cities Institute, London Metropolitan University. The Independent newspaper wrote that, 'For many years Ken Worpole has been one of the shrewdest and sharpest observers of the English social landscape.'

Product Description

About the Author

Ken Worpole is Emeritus Professor at the Cities Institute, London Metropolitan University, and adviser on public policy to the UK government, the Commission for Architecture and the Built Environment, and the Heritage Lottery Fund. He is also the author of many books and studies on architecture, landscape and urban design. The Independent newspaper wrote that ‘for many years Ken Worpole has been one of the shrewdest and sharpest observers of the English social landscape.'


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Viennese on 14 Nov. 2013
Format: Paperback
Ken Worpole has written about libraries and their place in society for over 20 years, and his interest in architecture and design as agents or reflectors of social change has led to his latest thoughtful volume on contemporary library architecture, designed to serve as a planning and design guide for librarians and architects.

Traditional collections of physical materials (printed or otherwise) have been somewhat overtaken by information via the internet, freely available and accessible to users outside the library building. Rapid development of electronic information resources and new media has been accompanied by the expansion of tertiary education and more choice in leisure and entertainment. The relevance of the public library today continues to be questioned and many prophecies made about its demise. But the book is still very much with us, with the number of published titles in the UK is still rising, and libraries will continue to acquire them.

Case studies of outstanding new library buildings form a large part of the book, many from abroad, but also a surprisingly large number here in the UK, despite public spending cuts. These should be invaluable to anyone preparing a scheme for a new building. The book concentrates on public and academic libraries because, the author states, these function as meeting places for people as well as cultural centres and storage for the collections they house. A useful chapter addressing lessons to be learned from the case studies also considers post-occupancy evaluations of buildings, which seem to be sadly lacking in the library world.

The final chapter concludes that libraries have a future, although in a very different format to what we are used to seeing.
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