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Conquerors and Slaves: Conquerors and Slaves v. 1 (Urbanization in Developing Countries) [Paperback]

Keith Hopkins
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
RRP: 36.99
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Book Description

31 Jan 1981 Urbanization in Developing Countries (Book 1)
The enormous size of the Roman empire and the length of time it endured call for an understanding of the institutions which sustained it. In this book, Keith Hopkins, who is both classicist and sociologist, uses various sociological concepts and methods to gain new insights into how traditional Roman institutions changed as the Romans acquired their empire. He examines the chain reactions resulting from increased wealth; various aspects of slavery, especially manumission and the cost of freedom; the curious phenomenon of the political power wielded by eunuchs at court; and in the final chapter he discusses the Roman emperor's divinity and the circulation of untrue stories, which were a currency of the political system. Professor Hopkins has developed an exciting approach to social questions in antiquity and his book should be of interest to all students of ancient history and of historical sociology.

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Product details

  • Paperback: 292 pages
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press; New Ed edition (31 Jan 1981)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0521281814
  • ISBN-13: 978-0521281812
  • Product Dimensions: 1.6 x 22.5 x 15 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 704,514 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

Book Description

The enormous size of the Roman empire and the length of time it endured call for an understanding of the institutions which sustained it. In this book, Keith Hopkins, who is both classicist and sociologist, uses various sociological concepts and methods to gain insights into how traditional Roman institutions changed as the Romans acquired their empire.

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A wonderfully bad book 13 Dec 2008
Format:Paperback
Conquerors and slaves is perhaps the most influential book on Roman history in the past 50 years. It is written from the Marxist or at least the left wing point of view, arguing that Rome was a slave-based society which rose to prominence on its militarist ethos, impoverishing the poor while enriching the few. It has been enormously influential, propelling the author from being Professor of Sociology at Brunel University to being Professor of Classics at Cambridge University and it is largely responsible for the bad press that Rome receives almost universally in universities today. I bought a second hand copy from Amazon, which turned out to come from Sheffield University, where the massive underlining and tattered repairs, testify to the enormous influence it has had on undergraduates over the past 50 years.

Personally, I think it is all wrong from beginning to end: Rome produced an attractive brew of peace and prosperity which enabled it to hold together one of the largest empires the world has ever seen. Nevertheless I cannot but admire the fine style and forceful writing of this wonderfully bad book
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